How do they fix a home sliding over a hill?

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A friends home is just a few doors away:( from a home thats about to slide over a hill...:(
the backyards have gone from 15 feet to just a few, and that home close by is about a foot and is for sale for 5 grand. Its vacant since the gas company terminated service and pulled the meter for safety reasons. its a nice ranch in a so so neighborhood. it makes me wonder how the pros do it, theres over a 100 foot drop to the valley below. it last sold for 6
Rappeling would be necessary to work behind the home
buddy showed me another house like this, the home currently sits above ravine street. the foundation is undermned and collapsed.
that is you can look under the footer and concrete slab. maybe 1/4 is exposed, i was afraid to get too close for a good look.
both homes are pretty nice and might make a nice investment for someone if they could be stabilized........
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last sold for 69,000 $$$
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It might cost that much to move the house itself to a new lot, without factoring in the new foundation which you would have to build for it...
It all depends on how far distance-wise you want to move it and how much the electric/telephone utilities are going to charge to move wires out of the way as the house has to pass by them...
~~ Evan
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On 1/26/2012 1:12 PM, bob haller wrote: ...

Virtually no chance at such a late date (and zero chance of doing it economically unless there's a multi-million dollar ocean view that could be salvaged which would be contraindicated by folks w/ that kinda' money would have done something before the situation had developed to this point).
--
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You'd have to get a really good deal on fill dirt to make it worth the trouble, assuming there's no underlying erosion issue causing problems.
I doubt the 100 ft drop is purely vertical, so that'd likely mitigate the fill amount requirements.
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Of course there is an erosion issue. The hill is sliding into the valley.
You can drape chain link down the hill, rebar and cement but ultimately the hill will have it's way.
--
Dan Espen

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It could just be that the grade of the hill was too steep for the material, and that once it is rectified, it could be stable, long term.
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Like a lot of other people I guessed this was California. Pennsylvania is a different story. First the OP needs a geologist.
If this is a liquifying mud hill it's hopeless. If there is some bedrock around the house could probably be tied into that and get a really nice view.
--
Dan Espen

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wrote:

Califiornia, right?
I heard on the news a very convincing show about bankruptcy that said that most buisiness owners try so hard to avoid it bankruptscy and wait too long to do bankruptcy and that's why they can't do a good job of it.
Similarly, I think this owner waited too long to try to sell his house. Earlier, maybe it could have been moved to another location. Althought since it's built on a slab, maybe there is hope yet.
They should build the houses with beautiful views on the other side of the mountain, where the land is less likely to collapse.
If you want to see the long term results of hills sliding into valleys, drive down the Shenandoah valley. It's shaped like \ / \_______/.
Calysta for First Tramp?
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This has to be Southern California. That is about the only place I can think of were people build ridiculously priced homes on eroding cliff- sides.
RonB
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Wait till after the mudslide, and see if you can get them to drop the price, a couple million.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

This has to be Southern California. That is about the only place I can think of were people build ridiculously priced homes on eroding cliff- sides.
RonB
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On Jan 26, 8:06pm, "Stormin Mormon"

actually the homes are in pittsburgh pa area.
both are for sale cheap, under or about 5 grand each.
one whole neighborhood of homes are in danger, ultimately 35 to 40
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.
Well they could be moved but that is a VERY expensive proposition and the legitimate firms which are capable of carrying out such feats of engineering are few and far between...
~~ Evan
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wrote:

Interesting. Do they know for sure they are all in danger? I can imagine a situation where so many feet per year is going away and eventually, all will go. But I can also image a situation where the erosion will get to solid rock that will take another million years to erode. Can you give us an address for this house or street name?
Pat
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Pittsburgh? I thought that was steel country. Can they make some girders, and excavate into the solid land, and better anchor the homes to firm earth?
Street name. Well, how does "Sunset View, Malibu, CA" sound? Maybe "Cliffside Drive, Malibu"?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .

Interesting. Do they know for sure they are all in danger? I can imagine a situation where so many feet per year is going away and eventually, all will go. But I can also image a situation where the erosion will get to solid rock that will take another million years to erode. Can you give us an address for this house or street name?
Pat
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On Fri, 27 Jan 2012 08:54:04 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

I think I found it in a newspaper article. Ivondale St in Greenfield (Pittsburgh) PA. Not exactly the kind of neighborhood one envisions from your street names above.

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theres a carbon street home and one in penn hills. not steller neighborhoods. low priced homes to begin with.
the one on bramble street endagers maybe 25 homes all built on the edge of a cliff
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wrote:

I couldn't find a carbon street in pittsburgh with houses on it.

On the north side of Bramble, where it goes east and west.
I count 20, and I can maybe see a couple small back yards, but if I didnt' know what I was looking for, I wouldnt' see it. Of course I don't know how old these pictures are. The date 2012, even though it's after the copyright symbol, must not ' mean anything. So it could be much worse now. Darn google maps, why don't they keep current?
I wouldn't even know there's a cliff there, but I think I see the trees growing up from the bottom of the hillt. .
One house has a funny looking pool or a very big hole in the back yard. The houses on either side might have small back yards. 6 feet?
Trees always make it hard to tell.
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You don't work on all sides of a home to move it, you work under it and inside of it to stabilize it so it can be lifted up onto cribbing then lowered down onto a house move platform to be towed to a new location if the roadways which access the area are wide enough to allow the house to pass through on them... The rest of the foundation of the home is cut away after it is lifted onto the cribbing before being lowered onto the house mover platform...
This all depends on the internal structure of the home in question if you have no access to the side(s) it needs to be lifted by in order to not fall apart that it is a no-go...
~~ Evan
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On 1/26/2012 5:53 PM, Evan wrote:

then you didn't see the mike rowe show dirty jobs where they moved a house. they needed access to all sides to get the jacks under the pressure points, so they could insert the girders that the house sit on, which then were lowered onto various wheeled assemblies, when it was moved.
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