How do I remove moisture from a double pane window?

I have a house with double pane windows. One of these windows has fog/condensation between the panes. None of the other windows have this problem. How can I get this moisture out? The window casing is wood. Charles
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Replace the window, or live with it.
What's happened is that the seal between the panes has been compromised, allowing regular air, including moisture, into the gap. There is absolutely no way you can recreate the conditions at the window factory where the gap was purged and filled with specially- dried air, or a gas like argon. Even if you could, you still have the problem of finding and sealing the leak that allowed the moist normal air to penetrate.
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snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com wrote:

What you just said is certainly the correct general answer.
However, I've been intrigued by reading about the Clear-Vu system for several years now:
http://www.thermalpanerestoration.com /
I'm not sure if they have licensees outside of Canada.
The description of what they do doesn't sound completely off the wall.
But, I'd expect if it is as good as their ads say I would have heard more about it by now, 'eh?
Does anyone in the group have any further info or experience with the Clear-Vu system?
A couple of times over the years I've "cheated" and used a glass drill to bore a couple of 3/16" holes through the outer pane of a fogged up insulated glass window, right at its bottom edge.
That got rid of the fogging and squeezed a couple of more years of use out of the windows before enough crud built up on the inner surfaces to guilt me into replacing the glass.
Probably my drilled windows didn't have quite as good insulating value as if they still had gas in them, but long before double pane glass came out we'd put up "storm windows" every winter, didn't we?
A word of warning, don't try drilling through a tempered glass window or door. The results will be dramatic and disapointing. (DAMHIKT)
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

Looks like the first link I gave was just a licensee. The parent company seems to have licensees in the USA now:
http://www.ccwwi.com /
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
(W1BSV + Brass Rat \'57 EE)
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You might make a bigger leak to the outdoors, in a cold climate.
Nick
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That is more along the lines of my thinking since replacing the window would be very costly. Thanks
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Replacing the _window_ would be but you don't have to do that. Any glass company will replace just the sealed glazing unit. I have had it done (on one window twice but the warrantee paid for the second shot).
Harry K
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Depends of course on the size of the window. 7 or 8 years ago I had a mower throw a rock into a 4ft x 8ft patio slider. Replacing the sealed unit in that puppy cost me a hair over $500. Ouch!
Jerry
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Tempered, laminated or some other form of safety glass was probably used, and required by code. That would add to the cost significantly.
Fortunately, replacing sealed units with regular glass is reasonably inexpensive.
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Crazy! My glass supplier stocks the standard replacement glass for that size patio door for $180. I wish I could make $320 to install a piece of glass!
JK
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On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 21:44:53 -0000, Big_Jake

I have a 21" ROUND thermo pane window. The cost is $480. To install it is $250 (because it is 20 feet up). I decided to just leave the fog in the window and hang a $200 round stained glass piece over it.
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locally pittsburgh window and door have a repair service.
remove section in trouble like 1/2 a double hung or picture window, with frame intact.
they in a matter of ours disassemble the frame, measure and make a new sealed unit.
our dogs throw themselves at our 3 foot by 4 foot picture window, it fogged.
75 bucks replaced the sealed unit with warranty.
compare to 6 or 7 hundred quote for a new window, a local contractor doing job at neighbor quoted me........
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on 10/4/2007 12:08 PM snipped-for-privacy@rochester.rr.com said the following:

Too late for the OP, but when my house was being built back in 1984, we had a long heavy duty extension cord running out from the Andersen C4 casement window to the temporary electrical service pole. One night, some kids decided to break in to hang out in the not quite finished house. In prying the c4 open, they cracked the glass pane. This was in October, so no humidity. I ran a bead of CA glue along the crack, temporarily until I could replace the pane. That temporary fix has lasted 23 years and the pane is still clear. I only get reminded of it when the SWMBO decides the change the curtains and drapes.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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alt.home.repair:

Your windows might still be under warranty. Look at the metal spacer between the panes for a serial number. It's probably a long series of letters and numbers. The manufacture date is coded in there. You'll see other notations that indicate the manufacturer and model.
Write down all the information and call the manufacturer. They'll decode the serial number and tell you whether the window _could_ be under warranty. They'll most likely refer you back to the installer or a local shop for warranty work.
Even if you have the job done yourself, the price shouldn't be outrageous. You can contact a local glass shop for a quote. Come to think of it, the glass shop might be able to answer your warranty question.
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Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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wrote:

Generally speaking, you can't. There are some firms that claim to offer such services but I wouldn't trust them. The seals have failed and the only really satisfactory solution will require the units be replaced. Check the warranty situation. Otherwise any decent glass company will be able to replace the units for you. And since you're only replacing the sealed glass unit and not the entire window the cost should be quite reasonable. I think I paid around $200 each to replace some panes that were around 15 sq ft each. They came and measured up, returned a week later, installed the new panels and hauled away the old. Job done!
Just try and find a reputable glass company that's been in business in your city for a few years (or generations!).
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On Thu, 04 Oct 2007 15:56:39 GMT, "Charlesmurphy via HomeKB.com"

Drill a hole and fill the void with argon. Seal the hole and cross your fingers.
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