how do I get my 13amp Black & Decker circular saw to work?

I won this circular saw through a work contest and tried to use it the other day and found it very difficult to cut through a 2x4. It's brand new so I was wondering if I wasn't using it correctly. I let it warm up to full speed then no matter how slow I proceed the blame stops when it cuts through a small part of the wood. Is there something that needs to be adjusted or did I get a dud?
Here's a link to the product
http://tinyurl.com/2qfa34
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Joe wrote:

I take it you have no experience with circular saws so I'll give two very basic questions/suggestions. First, is the blade installed in the correct direction? The teeth should be facing the base plate in the front of the saw. When the "blame stops" does the motor continue to run? If so the blade bolt on the arbor is not tight enough.
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John McGaw
[Knoxville, TN, USA]
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John McGaw wrote:

Uh, it might have been more helpful to say the teeth should be facing the BOTTOM of the base plate at the front of the saw, huh? <G>
When the "blame stops" does the motor continue to run?

Good point, I probably wouldn't have thought to ask that one. And I couldn't help thinking of Prez Truman when I read the "blame stops" (here)?
If the OP is that unfamiliar, I'll add that unless time is of the essence, I always hold the saw where it's at after I release the trigger until the motor winds down to a stop before moving it elsewhere. It just seems safer to me that way.
Jeff (Waiting to see if the OP tells us what he found wrong...)
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Jeffry Wisnia
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On Sat, 19 May 2007 12:24:35 -0400, Jeff Wisnia

I think Bob F said it even better. When I read the above, I thought to myself, Hey, when it faces the face plate, it faces both the top and bottom of the face plate. :) Maybe that's just me.
Now if the face plate were facing the blade's teeth, only one side of the face plate would be facing them.
I think Truman's sign said The buck stops here, and he was probably referring to a sawbuck, or a 10 dollar bill. He may have collected them as a hobby. At least that's what those who mess up on their jobs and quote him mean when they say it.
I'm curious what the saw sounds like at full speed. Has the OP heard enough saws to know if sounds right?

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mm wrote:

Not quite, I remembered it differently as referring to a game of poker, and just verified it through my friend Google:
The saying "the buck stops here" derives from the slang expression "pass the buck" which means passing the responsibility on to someone else. The latter expression is said to have originated with the game of poker, in which a marker or counter, frequently in frontier days a knife with a buckhorn handle, was used to indicate the person whose turn it was to deal. If the player did not wish to deal he could pass the responsibility by passing the "buck," as the counter came to be called, to the next player.*
The 10 dollar bill "sawbuck" thing came from (I think I'm right") the Roman numeral for 10 (X) looking like one end of a sawbuck, that wooden thing you'd rest a log in while sawing it. So, a $20 bill was came to be called a "double sawbuck", (XX).
I'm not a currency collector, so I can't say whether the X and XX were ever printed on the reverse of tens and twentys. maybe Someone here knows?
Anyway it seems the OP's problem was just a "loose disconnection" between the blade and its arbor. <G>
Jeff
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Jeffry Wisnia
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Ding Ding Ding! We have a winner! The blade bolt was not tight enough. Thanks a lot John! Works great now.
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Ah, that's good. Such simple things can really slow you down.
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Christopher A. Young
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If you are using any extension cord, make sure it is a "heavy duty" cord rated for 13 amps or more.
As others said, the teeth should be aimed to cut upward at the front of the saw.
Bob
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Also,it could be just a DULL blade. and trying to change cutting direction once in the cut can jam the blade in the kerf.
BTW,is it a cordless or corded saw?
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Jim Yanik
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Lets see, 13 amp saw. To run that cordless, you'd need a nicad about the size of a small car.
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