How Come My Brand New Stainless Steel Sink Stains?

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As part of a remodeling project, I installed a brand new stainless steel sink a few weeks ago. The model number is Kohler K-3145, Cadence, Self-Rimming Kitchen Sink. http://www.us.kohler.com/onlinecatalog/detail.jsp?prod_num145-4
With my old sink, we used to keep a bottle of liquid hand soap on the rim of the sink. We did that for about 30 years with no problems. With the new sink I happened to notice a stain on the sink in the shape of the bottom of the bottle about a week or two after I installed the sink. Hard scrubbing with dish soap won't remove it and neither will some other stuff I bought called "Stainless Steel Magic". Looking on the plus side, though, it is hardly noticeable. So, I suppose I can live with it.
So, what's the deal with this stainless steel sink staining so easily? I wonder what else I have to worry about with this new sink?
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They're very hard to keep clean, and easily discolored etc, at least that's been my experience. I don't care for stainless steel sinks at all.
Cheri
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There are several grades of stainless. Stainless can stain but not rust.
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 09:06:14 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown

You are correct that there are lots of variations that are collectively called Stainless Steel. You are incorrect about it not suffering from corrosion. Even the marine grades of stainless can and do corrode, and sometimes quickly and severely. Stainless Steel loses it's anti-corrosion abilities if deprived of oxygen.
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On Feb 23, 9:32 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Well...I guess I'm glad that my stainless sink isn't in an oxygen deprived state. I have a sailboat with lots of stainless rigging...30 years old and it still looks as good today as the day I bought it. But then it's got a lot of oxygen around.
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 10:09:13 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown

Better check those stainless keel bolts! And rigging failures usually happen inside swaged terminals. Easily missed even with a close visual inspection. 30 years is pretty old for rigging. Time for regular dye testing at least.
And the OP was having problems from setting a soap container on the Stainless Steel. That could be creating an oxygen poor environment.
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On Feb 23, 10:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

keel bolts are bronze as is all the turnbuckles. Standing rigging are replace about every 5 years not from the stainless going bad but from the wire stretching. Agree on the OP.
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 11:10:27 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown

Suddenly you don't seem quite so credible. Sorry.
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On Feb 23, 11:31 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Actually I don't know hardly anything about sailboats...just yanking your chain...or you anchor. hahahahaha!!!
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 11:53:18 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown

It was pretty obvious.
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On Feb 23, 11:56 am, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

Hell...life is just too damn short to be serious about anything.
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 10:09:13 -0800 (PST), Chemo the Clown

A lot depends on the grade of stainless. When you are on the 316 end it is pretty hard to tarnish but it is softer On the 304 end it is harder but it will oxidize. The 304 stainless prop on my boat will show a little surface rust but it is hard enough to grind up an oyster bar if you hit one. The shinier (316 end) ones you see on speed boats would get kicked up.
Sinks tend to be on the 304 end. Will a magnet stick to it?
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On Tue, 23 Feb 2010 13:37:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

When I was buying a "stainless steel" outdoor gas grill, a tip was to take a magnet with you to the store and test the material. IIRC, a magnet would not stick to the better quality stainless steel?
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Note: Not all SS's are non-magnetic. Even so called "good" 300 series stainless steels CAN be magnetic due to alloy & working (cold working or heavy polishing). So the magnet test can give erroneous results.
But a "magnet doesn't stick" result usually means "good stainless"
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On 2/23/2010 1:09 PM, Chemo the Clown wrote:

You might be surprised--swaged fittings for example can corrode internally. You don't see the corrosion until the fitting comes apart.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote in wrote:

Considering that corrosion itself is caused by oxygen, how does removing the oxygen cause corrosion? Many anti-corrosion strategies involve excluding oxygen from a corrodable metal surface.
Semi-stainless automobile exhausts, suffering (at least in the North American north-east) probably the worst possible environment for corrosion, remain remarkably corrosion-free for decades.
The OP is probably seeing deposits in the surface texture of the steel, not corrosion. Since the deposits would be in the texture, surface abrasion does not remove them; some sort of solvent is needed. I suggest acetone, liberally-applied, and a terry-cloth towel and an old toothbrush.
--
Tegger


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wrote:

Stainless loses it's anti-corrosion properties in absense of oxygen. I didn't make the rules! To fight corrosion, the stainless must create and maintain a layer of oxide on it's surface. It needs oxygen to do that.
See also: crevice corrosion
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote in

You seem to be alluding to something called "anaerobic corrosion", which appears to primarily be caused by certain species of bacteria. <http://corrosion-doctors.org/Corrosion-Factors-Cells/corrosion-cells-microbial.htm
Considering that the OP's sink spent considerable time building its corrosion layer before the OP installed it, and since the OP's liquid soap contains oxygen in the form of water, and since the soap bottle is located next to a water faucet, I find it kind of hard to imagine how oxygen would /not/ be permanently present. It's not like the soap bottle was hermetically sealed to the surface of the sink.
--
Tegger


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wrote:

I'm not alluding to anything, and I made no mention of any microbes. The qualities of Stainless Steel are widely known, and easy to find out about if you care to learn. Note just for openers that it is called StainLESS, not StainPROOF. Setting his soap bottle, with a soap covered bottom on the sink could easily promote the low oxygen conditions needed for rust to develop quite rapidly. There is not enough free oxygen in water to prevent corrosion issues in Stainless Steel. Stainless Steel submerged in water is very susceptible to corrosion.
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On Feb 23, 3:38 pm, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote: Setting his soap bottle, with a soap

Submersal in water will not cause a breakdown of the protective chromium oxide layer.
Try again.
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