Honda generators

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I also own a Yamaha EF1000 and hooked it up to see how it would do. It started my refrigerator without problem, and that takes 16A. I didn't test the voltage, but presume it was 120v and 0v.
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This "MAY" put you out of compliance with the NEC in the USA... This is not a well understood area of NEC Compliance, and even the folks that write and update the NEC, have been disscussing the issue for the last DECADE, and the practical issues are not universally accepted around the industry. You best bet, is to consult your local Electrical Inspector, and do as "He" suggests, then if you burn your house down, at least your Homeowners Insurance WILL pay off.
--
Bruce in alaska
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would say Doh! Buy the best oil that you can afford. First change is to get casting remnants and manufacturing dross out of engine. Why jeopardize motor for the sake a few cents?
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Per Dave + Gloria:

How come?
Somewhere, sometime I recall hearing somebody who seemed to know what they were talking about saying there's no problem mixing Mobil-1 with regular oil.
Been going on that assumption ever since by topping up my vehicle with dino oil towards the end of an oil change interval.
Is that assumption incorrect?
--
PeteCresswell

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Dave + Gloria wrote:

I'm not skimping on the oil, The first oil change is to seat the rings (and the main bearings, I think.) That doesn't work as well if you use synthetic oil. It will actually cost me more to go to the store and buy a quart of SF mineral oil than the difference in price for the SJ-or-better synthetic oil I have already.
But "penny wise and pound foolish" is the sort of thing I tend to do if I'm not careful. :-)
Bob
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Now I don't know about the Yamaha, but I was warned by the honda techs that using synthetic in the EU series caused a problem with the low oil sensor. They were issued some tech alert from Honda == for some reason synthetic builds up in it or something causing them to fail a LOT sooner than normal.
So just make sure you use what they suggest in the manual. Nothing like a damn sensor failing that keeps you from being able to start your gen!!!
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zxcvbob wrote:

I started it up, and it's really quiet -- just like it's supposed to be. I plugged a 6' heavy duty extension cord into it and tried a few power tools. Everything will start except my 1 HP (but it's old enough that it's an honest 1 HP) table saw. Will have to try it later with the 8000 BTU air conditioner since it's capacitor-start like the table saw. The other high-draw tools I tried all had universal motors.
I wonder if the saw might start up if there was an additional resistive load on the genny, like maybe a 300W incandescent light or a hair drier, to get the thing off idle before I turn on the saw? (should also help with the power factor)
I shut off the gas petcock and let it run dry, and it ran for *several minutes* just on the gas in the carburetor bowl. After the first minute or so I was beginning to think the shutoff didn't work.
Bob
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That might very well help. I sometimes have to do something similar with my RV's AC unit in very hot weather. The Generac inverter generator idles down so slow with no load that it can't handle the starting inrush. Most of the time just letting the AC's fan come up to speed is enough. If not, a momentary tweak of the microwave's timer knob does the trick. When I'm going to be in a very hot climate for awhile such as my periodic trip to Texas to visit a friend, I simply turn the idle screw up a bit so that the engine can't idle down as much.
A refrigeration-type hard start (AKA KickStarter) kit on the saw might help. Basically a capacitor and either a thermistor or relay, the kit supplies the reactive power the motor needs to get going.
Inverter generators can make you pull your hair out on occasion. Things that obviously should run sometimes don't. A little fiddling around with other load sometimes fixes it.
John -- John De Armond See my website for my current email address http://www.neon-john.com http://www.johndearmond.com <-- best little blog on the net! Tellico Plains, Occupied TN Multitasking: Reading in the bathroom!
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Neon John wrote:

I plugged in a hair dryer and the generator revved up a bit. Then turned on the saw, and switched off the HD as soon as the generator starting bogging. The saw started just fine. I ripped a short piece of 2x4 with it, and then shut it off. Then I tried it again with the HD on low and just left it on. The saw started right up. Probably if I ever do have to run the saw from the generator, all I need to do is plug in some lights with it (which I'll probably want to do anyway.)
I'm feeling better about this. Thanks.
Bob
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Thing is, the inverter generator engines actually turn FASTER with significant load than a constant speed generator. For example, per the manual, the EU2000 turns 5000 RPM at full load. They don't give any indication in the manual as to what the load vs speed slope is but from first hand experience, it doesn't take much load to get the engine spinning rapidly.

Check around the net. Many of the larger generator dealers offer free shipping.
John -- John De Armond See my website for my current email address http://www.neon-john.com http://www.johndearmond.com <-- best little blog on the net! Tellico Plains, Occupied TN There is nothing more frightening than active ignorance. ~Goethe
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I once ran a 24 cu/ft side-by-side refrigerator for about 13 hours with one tank (one gallon) of gas with an eu2000.
If you need something just a little bigger Yamaha has (or had) an inverter generator around 2700 or 2800 watts which might deserve a close look.

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Your parents' experience with the gas hog is one reason why I asked the question. Far too many people find out the hard way about how much fuel it takes to keep a 4 or 5kW generator running.
Unless you go for the very high dollar 3 or 4kW versions, an inverter generator isn't a good match for your load mix. The reason is that they have no surge reserve. That is, no motor starting reserve.
For instance, the EU2000 has a continuous rating of 1,600 VA (nice little fib there in the model number) but a peak of only 2000 VA. A momentary load, say, starting the compressor of the AC, of even a tiny bit over 2000 VA and the inverter shuts down, requiring an engine stop and restart.
A conventional generator, OTOH, may slow down a little and dip the voltage but it will supply much more surge current than its nominal full load rating. In isolation, an EU2000 or Yamaha equivalent would probably run any of the items you mentioned (minor question on the AC) The problem is trying to run several loads at once.
For instance, you might have the lights, a PC and the refrigerator running when the little AC tries to start. There simply isn't enough headroom left to do the job.
Yamaha has addressed this problem with their "boost" technology that uses the cranking battery to supply surge current
http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outdoor/products/modelhome/444/home.aspx
But this is a high dollar generator.
What I recommend is to get two different generators: a little 1kW unit to run your lights, PC and other light loads and a larger one, say 2500 watts, for the AC, furnace blower and perhaps the refrigerator. (depending on the fridge, it might run on the 1kW unit.)
The 1 kW unit which just sips fuel, can be run all the time. The larger generator can either be started and stopped as needed or can use the no-load idle-down feature that almost all constant-speed generators have to return to idle when no load is applied.
Buying chicom generators, you can get two for less than the price of one big name inverter generator. The 1kW 2-stroke unit that Northern Tool and others sell for as little as $99 does a fine job. I have two of 'em. One of those will start and run my electric lawn mower, something my 2,500 watt inverter will not do. A 4-stroke version is about double that price but, IMO, not worth it. The 2-stroke version is fairly quiet and with "no smoke" oil like Northern Tool sells, emits almost no fumes.
Harbor Freight, Pep Boys and many other similar places sell a nice little 2500 watt generator in the $300 range. Some versions use a honda clone engine manufactured under license from Honda. (I know the Pep Boys one does, not sure about the rest) Here's Harbor Freight's version:
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber456
If you dedicate the 2500 watt unit to the AC, furnace fan and perhaps the refrigerator then it can idle down when there is no load, further conserving fuel.
If you really just want 1 generator then I'd go with something in the 2500 watt class.
John

John De Armond See my website for my current email address http://www.neon-john.com http://www.johndearmond.com <-- best little blog on the net! Tellico Plains, Occupied TN Vegetarian - Indian word for "poor hunter".
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I like the yamaha's too.. the newer ones. I got onto the honda only because the yamaha I bought had a problem with the inverter when they first came out with an inverter model. Much MUCH line noise. Yamaha fixed that but by that time I was a honda guy.
If I was going to start out fresh I'd give the Yamaha a hard look no doubt.
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wrote:

you have one nearby www2.northerntool.com/generators.htm specs, etc will be in there
The reason, to me, that you want a Honda generator is that you want the Honda engine. I have one of their Honda-powered Northstar generators and it has proven reliable since 2000. Have run it for 8 days during Isabel with a tree on the house. Just used it when a tree felled by remains of a storm took out power, phone, cable. No problems, ever. YMMV starrin
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The honda can last 15000 hours if run easy, RPM is load dependant so at 100w it might only run 900 rpm, it also has as clean or cleaner power then your utility co, alt.energy.homepower is where folks are that have gotten 15000 hours, bull full load it and maybe you get 2-3000
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ransley wrote:

That 15000 hours is more likely with a slow diesel or a water cooled gas engine. I'd venture to say the Honda is more realistically rated at 2 to 3 thousand hours maximum, as compared to Briggs and Stratton's 500 hundred.
mike
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I have talked to people that claim near 15000 on campers. The reason is simple, the EU is not a 3600 rpm unit unless its full load, RPM is load dependant. Put it on a camper to run a few hundred watts and the 3500 watt unit might turn 900 rpm. At 900 RPM it might just last 50000 hours. There is a 900 rpm Deisel made in India that are known to last 100,000 hours. But load up a EU and 1500 - 2000 hours might ruin it. Take a car on a race track it might not last a day, drive it easy it might last 150000 miles. Tecumpsee and B&S non ohv 3600 rpm motors might only go 3-350 hours, mine did.
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and junkers like ETQ maybe 200 hours. But, for me, that's plenty. More than I'm likely to need.
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Christopher A. Young
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On Sat, 20 Sep 2008 22:43:11 -0400, "Stormin Mormon"

500 hundred? That's 50,000. Did you really mean that?
BTW, posting stuff AFTER the sig is not a good idea. When someone uses a newsreader that handles the sig separator properly, it interferes with quoting.
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