Home Depot 1/4" Lag Screw

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My understanding is that large Mormon families buy vaseline by the pallet. Generic, of course.
--
EA

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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I use saw wax. Stick a drill bit or screw in it and the little bit of lube will help it do its job. It has many uses.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
TDD
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

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"You can lead them to LINUX
but you can't make them THINK"
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I knew some one would mention soap. It works good to get the screw in but most soaps have water and corode the fastener over time.
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wrote:

It does but has the property of attracting moisture, hence causing rust, which on a 1/4" lag bolt probably won't ruin it...
I have a 1/2 gallon yogurt container I put a few wax toilet bowl rings. I stick screws and bolts in that, keep a smaller old prescription container filled for more "portable" use.
And on fine work, I might switch to paste wax because I can clean it up easier.
It makes my cordless drill battery last much longer, and I don't twist off lag bolts even when from Home Depot.

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I hadn't thought of toilet bowl wax. Neat idea!
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Christopher A. Young
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Jim Weisgram wrote:

Saw wax is much the same thing in a tube, you push the disc inside the tube to push out more wax. It's a little thicker than bowl wax but does a very good job lubricating any drill bit or saw blade used in wood or metal and it really helps with driving screws into wood or metal especially if the threads have to cut their way in metal.
TDD
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The Daring Dufas wrote:

I keep a chunk of paraffin in the cupboard for just that purpose. Works okay for the saw, too.
Jon
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

I have some (probably smaller) syringes I use for oiling tight spots. Somehow almost every time my mother is visiting she somehow spots the box of new ones and in a quivering voice asks me what they are for. I tell her again and show her the ones that have oil in them already. I think the one time I had actually just given blood so I even had a mark on my arm! Yes, a mother will never stop worrying about her children.
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I use vetrinary syringes with needles (bench grinder -- grind the needle flat nose) to dispense aluminum anti oxidant, for electrical connections. So far, no one has made an issue of it.
The cow teat syringes are obviously harmless, and they attract no attention at all.
Ah, well. Some folks worry about things.
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Christopher A. Young
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On 12/16/2009 07:53 AM, Leon wrote:

That seems odd.
For optimum strength in softwood, you want the pilot hole to be about 0.7 times the diameter of the root diameter of the screw. (0.9x in hardwood--or more particularly for wood with a specific gravity greater than 0.6) The clearance hole should be big enough that the threads don't engage, of course.
The above is from:
http://www.awc.org/pdf/NDSCommentaryCompressed/Part11WoodScrewspp133to139.pdf
Chris
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I did not look and don't doubt your findings but if fully embedded threads are not going to hold, a tight hole is not going to be any better. IMHO making the pilot hole smaller will crush the wood fibers when the screw goes in and in turn would weaken the part that the threads cut into. Then add to that the unnessary extra torque to properly seat the screw which IMHO would increase the chance of breakage.
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Well, it seems to me that compression would strengthen the material surrounding the lag threads. Think roll tapping (or thread forming) vs cut tapping, and/or think of a simple nail that compresses wood fibers. Roll tapping sposedly forms a stronger thread than cut tapping -- not perfectly analogous here, but it does sort of illustrate the benefit and strength of displaced material.
The Q is: what is the best overall compromise? In soft wood, I would go .010 smaller than root diameter, just to guarantee full thread engagement, esp. with iffy drilling. Which would only be .005 worth of compression. But, appaently in hard wood, you don't even want full engagement! Go figger....
The japanese dispensed with threads altogether, and just used dowels/pins/pegs. In the case, say, of a corner fence post, if you put snug-ish dowels in X, Y, and Z (per joint), the joint would be fully constrained. If all dowel holes were made through holes, the dowels could be easily removed. Actually, I think you could just as well dispense with the Z dowel, as each dowel effectively constrains 2 dimensions.
Don't know how practical this is, but it does have its own elegance. I heard recently about japanese/tibetan structures fastened like this, still standing after centuries -- nary a thread in sight. Of course, gravity helps in these cases, as well.
--
EA





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Existential Angst wrote:

They needed all the metal to make swords for lopping the heads off of their enemies.
TDD
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Chris Friesen wrote:

Cool, thanks Chris, that'll save me having to look up charts and deciding which one is the correct value next time!
Jon
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This isn't exactly news to anyone who's been involved in home repair for any length of time, you know.
You can get fasteners of significantly better quality, at a lower price, from any real hardware store. The category of real hardware stores includes: - Ace - Tru-Value - Do-it-Best - any hardware store with worn wooden floors and a little bell on the front door that tinkles when you walk in, where any employees under the age of forty are the owner's grandchildren; sadly, these places are getting harder and harder to find.
This category does *not* include - Home Depot - Lowe's - Menards - Hechinger's and similar places.
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So true. I've got a couple of such stores near me. But they are hard to find, and often go out of business for lack of customer support.
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I responded to Doug on a similar note. The old country hardware stores can be good if the owners know how to run a business compeditively. I have a hardware store near me that is thriving, with 3 big box stores within 10 minutes drive, and they beat the big box prices.
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On Dec 16, 7:57am, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

I grew up in a small town in Southern Oklahoma. We had a "real" hardware store on Main Street. Locally owned, at least 3 generations. Everybody had gone to school with at least one of the Stolfa kids. Didn't look like much from the front. When you walked in the front door, it had one of those little "tinkle" bells on a spring at the top. Hardwood floors about 100 years old that creaked as you walked across them. You could get help, advise (and you could rely on it being accurate), or just opinions about everything from the wether to the next local or college football game. The smell varied as you walked to different parts of the store; a chemical-fertilizer smell was predominant, with paint and varnish in one corner, a greasy- oily-gasoline smell over by the lawnmowers and garden machinery. They had some of everything, nuts and bolts to gaskets for pressure cookers, I even bought asbestos sheets to fix a space heater. I asked one of the guys once if they had a molasses gate, and without a blink, he asked "what size do you need?".
Then WalMart came to town. The manager complained that the high quality cutlery he carried cost more from his distributor than the most expensive stuff WalMart carried at retail. They just couldn't compete, and when WallyWorld put in a Super Store, it was the final nail in the coffin. I really hated to see them go. This was repeated in several other locally owned businesses, from stationary stores, to small sporting goods, to auto parts. We had a family-owned auto repair shop. We finally closed after almost 20 years. The folks that bought us out made it for another 3 years.
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On Dec 16, 10:29am, "&amp;amp;amp;#39;lektric dan"

So who is to "blame"? Walmart or the consumers who demanded a cheaper knife?
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