Heavy wood door & jamb swells in rain causing groove on far corner


In all this rain, my heavy wood door or wood door jamb is swelling so much it is causing the door to stick and groove at the far end from the hinges.
Should I sand it down (but then when it shrinks it will be too small, righ?)
Or is there a better solution?
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Melissa Andrade wrote:

Not necessarily, doesn't take much sanding (1/16?) and the door should still close nicely on the stop. It isn't the jamb that might need sanding, BTW.

Try tightening the screws in the hinges.
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dadiOH
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Planing is better than sanding. How much has to be taken off? You also want to be sure the door is sealed from moisture as much as possible to prevent big changes in size as the humidity fluctuates. I'd plane the door down enough to put a self sealing weather strip that allows for the slight size variation.
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Find out where the water comes from and divert it away from the door. It is obvious you have an architectural design problem since any competent designer can produce plans that make such mistakes nearly impossible. Your doorway might need a small portico or similar building element that would both add to the curb appeal of the house and eliminate the problem. Fiddling with the poor door and hoping for future dry weather won't solve the problem long term.
Joe
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--- Find out where the water comes from and divert it away from the door. It is obvious you have an architectural design problem since any competent designer can produce plans that make such mistakes nearly impossible. Your doorway might need a small portico or similar building element that would both add to the curb appeal of the house and eliminate the problem. Fiddling with the poor door and hoping for future dry weather won't solve the problem long term.
The water comes from the air. The cause of the problem is that the installer did not seal the end grain of the door which is allowing the wood to soak in the moisture.
For now plane the door just enough to restore function, and when it dries out when we get warmer weather then remove the door and apply some paint to the top and bottom of the door.
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Roger Shoaf
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