Hard to Start Stihl FS 36 Trimmer?

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replying to Stormin Mormon, Kenny wrote: Thanks I got my FS 36 going. I've had mine for 22 years still going strong. Nothing like a stihl!
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Lots of excellent advice to be found in the comments, I won't stress anythi ng aside from agreeing that these small engines shouldn't take more than 3 pulls to start. After 5 or 10 pulls you'll save yourself frustration by jus t stopping there and taking the plug out to see if you've flooded it or if it's not getting fuel (or spark). If it started easily in the past, and now find the plug black, oily and wet looking, buy a new plug. If the plug is dry and the primer bulb is functioning okay, the carb probab ly has become gummed-up. A little trick that sometimes works for me (I work on lots of little 2-strokes that use these carbs) is to remove the air cle aner and shoot a 1/2 teaspoon of fuel into the carb's intake using an eye d ropper. It's enough to keep the engine running momentarily and MIGHT suck t he gummy crap free. If so, and there was gas left in the tank, dump it and mix up an all new fresh batch. Before resigning myself to rebuilding a carb I'll first dump all the gas and put just enough "Seafoam" in the tank to g et it through the primer system. I'll let that sit while hoping it'll work it's magic... I'll then go back and attempt to start it using the force-fee ding, eye dropper technique ~but add 'some' mixed fuel into the tank FIRST or else you might be so happy it's running that you forget the importance o f the fuel-oil mixture!
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Ether is NOT a good idea on a 2-cycle. WD-40 (butane and lube) will do no harm as primer to start fuel moving again.
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Use Either-starting fluid that has Oil added
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NOT recommended by experienced 2-cycle techs! BIGGER bang...is not necessarily a BETTER bang!
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For starting and not continual use it wont hurt anything, the cilinders are oil coated and the either I use has oil. Plus its a vapor it wont wash cilinders nearly as bad as flooding it with gasolene.
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Well...this is only advice (and caution).
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W. eWatson wrote:

My friend's trimmer wouldn't run so we got the manual cleaned the carb, took out the needle valves, sprayed cleaner into the holes, put the needle valve screws back in using the manual as a guide for the number of turns open from fully closed and fueled it up. It cranked and ran on the first pull.
I blew his mind once when I ran a weed eater on compressed air.
TDD
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Stihl products I have had usually had starting problems with fuel lines cracking. Worst case was a chain saw only 2 years old, only worked decently the first year. If you tinker with the carb, a new fuel line might be a good idea.
Joe
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I have owned my FS36 for almost 15 years. Had it tuned up 4 years ago. Recently it started to lose power, then last week it just wouldn't start. I went to local Stihl sales/repair shop with it. They quoted $90 to fix it, or $149 for a new FS49. I retreated to think it over. Today, after reading the book carefully, I repaired it and it runs like new. I cleaned the spark plug, and air cleaner but the item that isn't mentioned in this thread is the Spark Arrester. I cleaned that and I believe it was that which made the difference. It was caked solid black. I removed it, put in in my vice, (clamping it along the margin of the little screen) and started scrubbing it with a fine guage wire brush. I kept kept flipping it around and scrubbing and soon it was as good as new. Put it in, and the engine started up with one pull! I trimmed all day and it performed like a champ. The owners manual clearly states that if power starts to fail, to replace the spark arrester. That is an easy to miss or dismiss recommendation. Total out of pocket expense = $zero. PS. If you want to take the rear plastic body cover off to tidy up or just explore the engine's layout, you will need a 9/64 long-tailed Allen Wrench.
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wrote:

You make a very good point. Carbon deposits in a spark arrestor or a carbon clogged muffler are not normally mentioned here, regarding it being a possible problem.
Thanks.
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