GFCI wiring procedure

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On my old GFCI the Line wires and Load wires are spliced together and pigtailed into the GFCI to not protect the outlets downstream. I'm trying to install a Leviton GFCI with Smartlock and when I try to wire it the same way it will not reset. I do not want to protect the outlets downstream of the GFIC. Is there a way around this? David Jasinski
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dclutch wrote:

It sounds like you have a ready-made built-in fault. Why would you not want to resolve it properly?
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dclutch wrote:

Just don't hook anything up to the load wires.
Chris
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There is no reason why it shouldn't work. Units with smart lock won't reset unless you've turned the power back on.

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The smartlock, unlike other GFCIs, will not send power to the "line" side if it is installed backwards. This is to specifically prevent what you want to do. Are you absolutely sure that is not what you are doing?
If you are pigtailing it, the GFCI would have no way to affect the pigtailed circuit since they don't go through the device. So what ever your problem is, it does not involve the GFCI.
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Whoever installed that GFCI clearly does not understand how they work, and, equally clearly, did not read the directions.

There certainly is -- follow the directions that came with your new GFCI. I *promise* they do *not* tell you to wire it the way you're trying to.
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wrote:

Why wouldn't it work with pigtails? The GFCI comes off the pigtail, and the downstream outlets come off the pigtail. Everything is in order.

outlets off the line side, if there are enough backstab connections to do that. but then it is exactly the same as pigtails.
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No, it's not in order. Read what he wrote again: "the line and load wires are spliced together." Wrong, wrong, wrong. Either his description is wrong, or the wiring is wrong -- but something is definitely very wrong.
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 12:49:11 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

There's something ambiguous here. Does "the line and load wires are spliced together." refer to the wires coming from the LINE and LOAD terminals of the GFCI (wrong) or does it refer to the wires coming into and out of the box?
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Phooey. There's no ambiguity about it. In plain English, "A and B are spliced together" means they are spliced to _each_other_.
That may, or may not, be what the OP _intended_ to write, but it certainly is what he _did_ write.
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 16:42:43 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Did you actually read what I said, about the difference between the connections on the GFCI and the wires coming into the box? WHICH A goes to WHICH B?

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When I see "pigtailed" in reference to GFCI wiring, I already know it's wired wrong.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

the GFCI to *not* protect any downstream outlets. We can debate all day long whether such an intention is wise, prudent, reasonable, etc. but it unquestionably is not "wrong".
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 16:45:07 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Most new GFCIs have dual terminations on each screw so you gan effectively "pigtail" the connection in the device. The exception is if this is on the load side of a multiwire circuit where the code says you must not use the device to complete the neutral circuit.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It's not wrong if all the installer intends to do is protect the outlet built into the GFCI. It is in fact best practice to not protect outlets in a different room with a feed through receptacle type GFCI so that when the GFCI opens on a fault the user has a better chance of finding the problem in the same room as the GFCI.
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 15:30:42 GMT, "Tom Horne, Electrician"

I so sometimes put a GFCI in an inside receptacle, where an outside receptacle is connected to the LOAD side. This makes it possible to control things like holiday lights from inside.
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 13:05:09 -0600, Mark Lloyd

Why not just use a device timer?
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 15:36:43 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

A GFCI is also a switch. A device timer is not a GFCI. This was for someone who would complain about a more complex installation.
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2007 19:06:19 -0600, Mark Lloyd

It is not listed that way and there is no gurantee that "testing" it under load will not burn out the contacts.
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Mark Lloyd wrote:

It's a neat trick, but a GFCI receptacle should not be used as a switch unless it is rated for switch duty. Same for circuit breakers.
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