GFCI breakers for Al wiring

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After searching high and low I'm coming to the conclusion that an Aluminum compatible GFCI outlet does not exist.
So I want to install GFCI breakers on the associated circuits as an alternative to fishing new wire.
How do I know if a GFCI breaker can be used on a circuit that is wired aluminum?
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use the correct al-cu connectors to make some copper pigtails, and use a regular gfci outlet

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I would look around the internet to see if you can find a GFCI compatible with aluminum wiring first. Fitting a GFCI in an existing box is tough enough, but if you had to add pigtails, it's going to be just about impossible unless it's already in an oversized box.
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wrote:

GFCI breakers will still protect you if you stick a fork in a toaster even with aluminum wire.
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Kristen Caldwell wrote:

The issue is not the breaker itself, but the connection with the aluminum wire. When using aluminum wire you need to ensure that all connected devices are rated for use with aluminum.
This can be expensive. For instance, an aluminum-rated toggle switch costs about four times as much as one rated for copper only.
Chris
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Yeah, and that's the problem - I haven't yet found a Cu/Al GFCI outlet for *any* price. Which is why I was thinking it might be better to just do it at the breaker box. More inconvenient if you trip it, and yeah, it might be hard to physically stuff one in the box too.
Or I could call an electrician and have them crimp-pigtail just the offending receptacles and use a regular GFCI outlet on those.
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"Kristen Caldwell" who doesn't know shit about wiring wrote

You should never connect a copper only rated device to aluminum wire because it creates a serious fire hazzard. If you don't know that you shouldn't be answering questions from people who obviously already know more than you.
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I got a jar full of pennies and nickels and dimes?.
How come it hasn't caught on fire yet?
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On 14 Apr, 07:30, "Kristen Caldwell"

GFCIs protect against L-E shocks and shorts, which have nothing to do with the risk that ali wiring posts. Al oxidises at joints, heats up & catches fire. A gfci doesnt make the remotest difference to that. An AFCI however would.

I'm not that familiar with US practices, but I dont expect many modern electrical parts will have al compatible connections.

yup. If you need to put an AFCI in each circuit, the AFCI can have a copper tail leading to a purpose designed cu to al connector. Follow the proper procedure in the instructions, al behaves differently to cu.
AFCIs arent perfect, but they do reduce risk quite a lot.
NT
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On Apr 14, 1:55 am, snipped-for-privacy@care2.com wrote:

I'm under the impression that current AFCIs don't protect against the type of arc faults Al joints are prone to.
I'm not installing GFCIs to mitigate the Al risk, it's to mitigate the general risk of operating electrical devices near water.

Switches and outlets do, actually, but GFCI outlets seem to be an exception.

Do you have any references that show currently marketed AFCIs to reduce the risk of bad Al connections?
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wrote:

no, I didnt realise they were parallel only. Where I am in the world we dont have AFCIs.
NT
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All wiring devices like receptacles, switches, GFCI breakers etc. are marked for Alum. and or copper usage. Some are copper only some are will work with both.
If in doubt you could make a short jumper. If your circuit conductor is # 12 or #10 alum. use a copper #12 conductor spliced to the circuit conductor using a copper/alum. butt splice A compound such as peremetx could also be used to coat the conductors. Permitex is a paste like compound that contains both copper and aluminum metals.
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I read that the butt splice method is not a good idea and that is why the COPALUM pigtail splice exists. Same deal with the Ideal purple wire nuts vs Scotchlok wire nuts that are spring loaded. In both cases the latter exerts more force on the aluminum wire keeping it from loosening as it inevitably expands and contracts.
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On 17 Apr 2007 08:02:29 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@mail.win.org"

There is a new device out there called Alumiconn by King Innovation that is as good as Copalum and you don't need any special tools or training. It is a small terminal block with set screws in an insulating jacket.
http://www.kingsafety.com/products/alumiconn.html
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On Apr 17, 10:30 am, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yeah, that looks like a good product and it's even UL listed. But it's not listed by CPSC as an approved repair method (yet). This might be the best way to go in the end, the product makes sense and is not that expensive.
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On 17 Apr 2007 14:11:09 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@mail.win.org"

CPSC is not a nationally recognized testing lab, it is a political entity.
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You are correct...CP/AL spring loaded nuts could be used. I used Scotchlock spring loaded nuts for years and never had a problem
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Do you have a suggestion where I could find such a nut? All the Scotchlok nuts I have found on their site say Copper connections only... though it certainly seems that CO/ALR spring nuts do exist somewhere.
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On 17 Apr 2007 14:21:29 -0700, " snipped-for-privacy@mail.win.org"

The only NRTL listed CU/AL wirenut is the purple Ideal #65
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Even with the GFCI outlets, I'd install AFCIs (arc fault current interrupters) at the circuit breaker panel. They're required by the NEC now for bedroom outlets in new homes and arc faults are one of the failure modes for aluminum wiring as the connections go bad. See: http://www.cpsc.gov/CPSCPUB/PUBS/afcifac8.pdf
You can also get combined GFCI and AFCI circuit breakers. Then you don't need to worry about the AL connections at the outlet.
TKM
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