Getting 110 volts in a 220 volt Pumphouse

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So does that mean he would be in better shape code-wise to simply tape the stripped ends of the wire to the bulb contacts, avoiding the fixture? ;)
Gregm
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So which is a pump-house? a dwelling unit, or a guest-room of a hotel?
I mean, I *HAVE* heard of an alternative interpretation of the phrase "village pump", to mean a lady of negotiable virtue...)
--Goedjn
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I had 240 volt European style outlets installed in my bathrooms. They are all fed through 20 amp 240 volt double pole GFCI breakers and when it was inspected the inspector had no problem with it.
I have frequent visitors from Europe and it is more convenient to provide them with an easy way to operate personal appliances.
P
Tom Horne wrote:

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How did you get 50 cycles?
BB

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For electric shavers and portable electronics, it generally doesn't matter whether they're fed from 50 or 60hz. Induction motors and transformers care, but often not enough to worry about.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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I didn't. Tghe motors just run 20% faser.
RB
BinaryBillTheSailor@Sea++.com wrote:

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WELL... LA-DEEEE DA!
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Obviously, that shouldn't apply to a pumphouse. But it will make 240V bulbs hard to find.
Interpretation may be tricky. A permanently installed 240V device wouldn't be allowed to have a pilot lamp for example...
If you put two bulbs in series in different fixtures, neither "fixture" has terminals exceeding 120V apart. But I _really_ don't like this one.
Another solution to the OP's question is to consider low voltage lighting. While it'd be difficult to install the LV transformer on the 240V in the pumphouse (would that qualify as a luminaire per above?), since there is essentially no code requirements on LV wire (except where it may come in close proximity to a "normal" circuit), running a 12V line from a transformer on the house to LV lighting in the pumpshed would likely be no problem.
My gardening shed is "wired" with 12V light fixtures. The transformer is on the house, and the wire is only buried a few inches deep.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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It would be interesting to understand the thought process that went into this requirement. Older versions of the NEC (I looked at a 1981 copy) prohibited 240 volts for circuits fused at 15 amps or less. The implication being that a 20 amp circuit was/is permitted to operate at 240 volts. This may explain why my inspector signed off on it.
RB
Chris Lewis wrote:

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Tom Horne wrote:

But.... This is an unoccupied pump house. So wouldn't violate that section of the code.
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Hi, Can't find 220V bulb? How about two ordinary bulbs in series? Tony
Pat Keith wrote:

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Just buy a 240 volt bulb. The Europeans use these just like we use 120 volt bulbs.
RB
Pat Keith wrote:

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Pat Keith wrote:

Put *two* light bulbs in series and connect the ground wire to their common neutral. That will drastically reduce the current you're putting back on the ground wire -- if the lamps are the same wattage, no current will flow through the ground wire unless one burns out. It will also be safer than letting the neutral float because the with two lamps in series and a floating neutral, the full 110V will be on the socket shell when you change a bulb. It is also safer than using a 220V screw-in lamp for the same reason (energized threaded portion when you are screwing in a new bulb.)
Use a double-pole switch to control the lights.
It's still not kosher, but it's getting safer...
Bob
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zxcvbob wrote:

I'm not convinced that deliberately connecting any thing powered to the equipment ground counts as "safer"....
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No. This is no better than using a single 120V light between the hot and ground.
If that ground ever separates upstream, very bad things happen. Ie: the pump housing (and maybe even all of the OP's plumbing!) goes hot.
Bad bad bad.
You MUST NOT provide any current path to ground wire outside of the main panel.
If two lamps in series are to be used, the wire between them MUST NOT be connected to anything else.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Wire 2 lamp sockests in series and be sure to use the same size lightbulbs in each.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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a) wire up a 220v outlet, and use a travel converter, that works on 60Hz, to generate a small amount of 110.
b) wire up a 220v to 12vac transformer, and use 12 volt light bulbs, either the small halogen, or automotive bulbs, or get 12 volt bulbs for standard bases. The light switch and wiring can all be low voltage.
The second option sounds like the best one to me, as long as it isn't 110 volt power tools you want to run out there. This is like what they do for RV users, or battery run lights.
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I sorta liked the 240 volt light bulb replies. So I found some 60 watt 240 volt bulbs from grainger.com and ordered them. John Hines comment made me unsure about their use. I like your suggest about a 220 volt outlet. I can just plug my 240 volt lamp into it when needed.
Thanks all
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how about two 110 volt lites is serys to use the 220 volts no need for a nut. or use a step down tranfromer
safemale
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Go to the nearest "Light Bulbs R Us" store and get them to order you a 220v bulb. They are available and relatively cheap Here is a 100watt example you can order on-line for $5.50 each http://www.topbulb.com/find/Product_Description.asp_Q_intProductID_E_40430
Steve B.
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