Gasoline Storage: Zoning?

I'm thinking that there must be some legal limits on how much gasoline somebody is allowed to store in their garden shed. Safety comes to mind.... if there's a fire, the amount of combustibles would be a concern to fire fighters.
Does anybody have experience here? Granted such ordinances probably vary from municipality-to-municipality with higher or no limits for farmers and more stringent limits for suburbanites.
But are such limits common? Or am I over-thinking this?
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Pete Cresswell

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Per (PeteCresswell):

I think this post was premature. A moment's Googling came up with: http://tinyurl.com/lg34hon
"For safety reasons, the EPA discourages consumers from storing more than 1 to 5 gallons, and the National Fire Protection Association proposes a limit of 25 gallons. Local fire codes determine whether your stockpile is legal: In New York City, for example, you can't keep more than 2.5 gallons."
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Pete Cresswell

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On 2/18/2014 8:48 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I've no idea on residential requirements; never heard of any anywhere we've lived but those have all been in fairly small communities and have never had need/desire for more than a 5-gal can or two at most.
Farm on-farm storage isn't limited in volume but over 1,320 gal aboveground or more than 42,000 gal underground and could "reasonably be expected to discharge oil to waters of the US or adjoining shorelines, such as interstate waters, intrastate lakes, rivers, and streams" has to have an EPA-approved spill plan in place.
Needless to say, the average ahr poster probably won't have sufficient supplies on hand to require same... :)
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On 2/18/2014 6:48 AM, (PeteCresswell) wrote:

I recall something in the mortgage papers I signed regarding gasoline storage.
I remember visiting my brother in Florida and seeing about 50 five gallon containers in the garage. When a hurricane is approaching he fills them to power his generator.
In urban areas of California the electricity goes out so rarely that there's no need for a generator. Even after an earthquake the power is restored pretty quickly to buildings that haven't been destroyed.
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On Wednesday, April 9, 2014 2:44:31 PM UTC-4, sms wrote:

I've got 5. For the boat and jetski. They rape you at the marina.
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On 4/9/2014 1:44 PM, sms wrote: ...

That'll all depend on just what gets taken out and where you are relative to same...wouldn't necessarily count on it when "the big one" arrives.
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best to store gasoline in a shed far from your home. at least tat way if theres a fire its limited to your shed
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