gasoline for lawnmower

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OK, I've spend some bucks to get my Murray carb cleaned out, and I'm told that I can avoid that problem (though it's taken ten years to happen ...) in the future by using appropriate, well seasoned gas.
I'm told (1) to use Sta-Bil or equivalent in my gas, (2) I really should use 92 octane -- the "good stuff", and (3) I was told separately to throw in some "lead substitute" as well.
So, what's the real deal here? The stabilizer is, I know, to keep old gas from gunking up the engine, but what about the others? I need a gasoline recipe for low maintenance and reliable service. I don't recall the Murray instructions saying anything about all this stuff.
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Doug wrote:

The only think I've ever done was to run mine really dry at the end of the season to make sure that there is no gas left to go bad. I usually include using the choke or primer as it starts to die to keep it going as long as possible to make sure it is as dry as possible.
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Bob F wrote:

fuel shutoff valve doesn't seem to shut anything off. It turns (at least the exposed plastic tab sticking out of the plastic casting does), but apparently whatever is supposed to block the fuel line is no longer connected. Guess I'll have to drive it around in circles, grating more leaves, till the tank runs dry.
-- aem sends...
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aemeijers wrote:

Or just leave it running while you do other tasks in the area.
I'm always careful about how much gas I put in for the last use.
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wrote:

The snow blower is stored dry over the summer.
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aemeijers wrote:

A spare turkey baster will let you suck most of the gas out of small engine fuel tanks and squirt it into a gas can which you can then drain into your car's tank - unless you need it for a snoblower.
Jeff
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wrote:

1) Maybe
2) Wrong use 87 octane in (my) small engines,
3) Huh?
14) Fix in another "ten years".
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Andy comments:
You could just crank it up once a month and run it for 5 minutes......
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I have no less than 9 motors of both 2 and 4 stroke. Like you, I make sure I start them at least once a month. I have never used Sta-bil, nor anything over 87 octane unleaded. I keep my tanks full. A few of these motors are over 15 years old.
Running them keeps everything lubed as it should be and not allowed to dry out. I am a firm believer that leaving them sit without running them is MUCH worse than running them. But, to each their own.
Hank <~~~get the motor running, head on down the highway
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wrote:

Use Stabil. It must be added to the gas when the gas is still fresh. Nothing will revive old gas and the problems it causes. Do NOT use 92 octane gas in a lawn mower! Also skip the lead substitute if your mower is newer than 1975.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 19:10:10 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

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On Nov 11, 6:27pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I refill that container it gets another dose of Sta-bil.

rich to be used perhaps causing the engine to run too hot? And in my area finding the ethanol-free gas is getting extremely difficult.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 16:38:40 -0800 (PST), snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

ethanol free high-test is a LOT easier than finding ethanol free regular.
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Just FYI, it was my lawnmower service mechanics who suggested high octane. "Oh, we always use the premium gas!" I had never heard that before myself. Sounded a bit fishy.
The business about lead substitute was from an elderly neighbor, who probably is pre-1975 in his 2-cycle universe.
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wrote:

Leaded fuel is NOT required (or even desired) in 2 stroke engines. Lead was required to protect the valves, which the VAST majority of 2 stroke gasoline engines do not have.
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On Wed, 11 Nov 2009 20:30:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

We should protect them anyhow.
Why rely on lame excuses?
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Two strokes have a reed valve, instead of the kind found in four strokes. The four stroke valves, I'm not sure what they are called.
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On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 06:51:20 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

totally port timed.using no valves at all. Then there are 2 stroke engines that use valves just like a 4 stroke and use forced induction.(and have oil in the crankcase like a 4 stroke)
However, the most common 2 strokes are either valveless or have reed valces - which are not exposed to the "dragon's breath" and therefore do not suffer from seat welding/erosion like 4 stroke engines - which is what lead in the fuel was pretty good at preventing. - so - lead is NOT required on most 2 stroke engines, and in fact is more of a problem than a help.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Tetraethyl lead was added more to increase the octane rating of gasoline than protection of the engine parts.
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wrote:

utility engines do not need high octane. Those that do (racing marine and snowmobile come to mind) like unleaded high octane much better than leaded. Without lead, better seat and valve face material is required for long life on 4 strokes.
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