Garage Floor Drain Problem


I have a drainage problem in a newly poured garage floor. Being in very rural area I had only 1 or 2 contractors to choose from. The contractor that I hired poured the 4' stem wall, did a great job, but then failed to follow thru with the slab for amost a month. Kept saying they were backed up with work. The carpenters that built the garage claimed to have experience in pouring garage floors, so I agreed to let them pour. Bad Idea. The floor is 24x28, is 5 inches thick, and has drain in center. The floor is heated, hydronic pex tubing. Although I asked that the pitch be set to between 1/8 and 1/4 per foot, it's not even close. Using a laser, I measured at MOST only 1 inch drop from perimeter (about 14') to drain center. My math tells me that 2 1/2 or more is what I should have. No water drains at all from any point, and there are several "duck ponds". I suspect somebody was over-zealous with a power trowel. The guys that did the work are willing to make good, but I don't think they have a clue as to how, so... what to do? I thought at first maybe there was some leveling product or something that could be troweled, but after some googling I get the impression this won't work (wont stick, will crack, etc.). The responsible party seems to think the only viable option is to grind the slab to the correct pitch. Ok, but I am worried about cutting the hydronic tubing, not knowing exactly how deep it is embedded. I planned on coating the floor with an epoxy paint, so not too worried about appearance. Help!
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Steve Barker
Paola, KS
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Unless they're willing to assume the entire cost of ripping it out, and replacing it all including the tubing work, then I'd leave it alone. Most slabs won't run toward a drain, and I personally sure as hell wouldn't want a 2 1/2" drop in my floor in 14'. I'd feel like a crazy house. A good foam squeegee is what you need.
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Steve Barker



"d_g_peterson" < snipped-for-privacy@centurytelDOT.net> wrote in message
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wrote:

Well my first home had a garage floor drain and that type of slope, it was a non issue.
sadly I think ripping it up and starting over is all thats available:(
If yoiur willing to live with it a BIG discount is due from the contractor.......
I had a imiliar issue with my asphalt driveway they sloped it the wrong way and left some puddles which are a hazard every winter, creating icy patches..........
I would have them rip it up and start over including all new heat lines. Its a cost of doing business for the contractor and they WOULDNT do it again!
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Go to http://www.mcmaster.com/ and page 1977. Problem solved.
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You plan on raising pigs or weekly mud wrestling or something?
You are lucky they screwed up. Most people want a level floor in the garage.
On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 13:09:39 -0600, d_g_peterson

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Well, I am already doing the squeegee bit. However, regarding WANTING a level floor, I'm sure some people want a level floor, but in this garage, I don't. I want a floor that drains. This is a second garage (and very expensive, better interior finish than my house, tongue&groove, cathedral ceiling, etc.). Our other garage is also infloor heat and it drains great. Well worth the "sacrifice" of a pitched floor, (which is barely noticeable anyway, given it's packed with vehicles, etc.). We live in the Superior snow belt in northwoods,WI, and the main intent for this building is snow melt for a snow plow, snowmobiles and 4 wheelers. Since the floor is heated, the standing water that sits on floor turns the building into a SAUNA quickly. All the wood swells, windows totally soaked with condensation, etc. Spending an hour squeegeeing about a half inch of standing water across a 24x28 floor every time snow-covered vehicles are pulled in is not what I intended when I paid to have the job done. Was honestly hoping somebody would confirm that the idea of power grinding was not unheard of, since this was recommended by a large supply house/rental center that caters to the concrete contractor trade. If I have to live the problem, so be it.
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Well if your tubing is on top of your rebar (like it should be) and IF the rebar got positioned properly, you don't have margin enough to grind an inch and a half off. I'm afraid you'd be dangerously close to the tubing, and once you even expose a bit of it, you're screwed. So unless there's some way to 100% confirm the tubings depth, I wouldn't go the grinding direction.
As a side question, what are you heating your radiant floors with?
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Steve Barker



"d_g_peterson" < snipped-for-privacy@centurytelDOT.net> wrote in message
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wrote:

I have 3 detached buildings all with same set-up of in-floor radiant. Heat source are plain old cheapo 40 gal LP gas water heaters, plumbed like closed system boilers, ie. outlet at hot water out, return at original drain cock, taco pump, expansion tank, air scoop, etc. 3 circuits, tight spacing ~9" at perimeters, widen to 12" near centers. Recently for about a week straight, maximum daytime temp outside here was about -5 to -10 and inside temp in buildings never dropped below 64. 1 500 gal lp tank serves 2 building, and is usually good for entire winter.
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Thanks for the detailed info. You didn't mention the dimensions of the buildings. I've got a 30x40 and am going to attempt to keep it above freezing with solar panels. I've got 4 - 300' circuits and one that's about 120'. The fuel consumption you mentioned certainly doesn't seem excessive though. Also, I'm curious to what part of the country you're in.
thanks!
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Steve Barker


< snipped-for-privacy@centurytel.net> wrote in message
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On Sun, 18 Feb 2007 22:09:21 -0600, d_g_peterson

At my last place of work there was a large concrete pad used for storing blowout preventers for oil rigs. They're real heavy stuff. So the pad sank into the ground over time. To expand the facility and build a factory sized shed over it they had to raise the pad to grade level again. This was done by grouting. A heavy duty truck drilled holes to get under the pad then injected concrete (or maybe something else) until the pad was grade level again. There must have been a drain trough leading into a drainhole in the middle of the pad somewhere because servicing those blowout preventers involved steam cleaning, sand balsting and pressure washing. Anyway look under oilfield servicing groups to find if there is a concrete grouting service company to do the type of work you need.
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Hello,
I'm having the same problem. I can see two solutions:
- Putting a big "carpet" under the car. - Paste a kind of "rubber" around the car. That way, the water will not go everywhere in the garage. Does this product exist and can be bought somewhere?
Thank you, Pascal ;

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