Garage Door Sprng Snapped....How to repair?

Page 4 of 5  
Actually, I thought I had the replacement process really well figured out. But I kept hearing some really hysterical tales fro folks as to how dangerous the replacement rocess was. I couldn't see why the process was so dangerous, so I decided to ask before jumped in.
Unfortunately, far too many folks confuse extension and torsion spring. And add to the hysteria by not paying attenion to what is actually being asked.
Like you.
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim McLaughlin wrote:

Well Jim,
There are those that should not touch anything. A neighbor released the brackets on his expansion springs with the door closed!!! Fortunate for him he had only minor injuries.
He is probably a guy who might reach under his mower with the engine running to see if the blade is turning. Etc. etc.
Only warning is to be real certain the door is blocked open and can't come down in any way. At least that is if you have a heavy door.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Its an extension spring not a torion spring.
--
Jim McLaughlin

Reply address is deliberately munged.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I almost killed myself screwing around fixing a garage door. Call a pro. But watch all for ripoff outfits. The ones with full page ads in the yellow pages that advertise $29 service charge. They are crooks in my experience. They will tell you you need $1000 of repairs. It is BS. An honest job is about $150 to $200 with springs. You might call Wayne Dalton if they have a store near you. They fix all brands near me and are very reliable.
"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in message

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Art writes:

Because you didn't know the proper techniques, correct?
Tell us the story.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Quite honestly, I did not realize how heavy the door was. Plus the door was an early composition material that sucked in moisture and bacteria was actually feeding on the glue. It was a double width door using an extension spring which shows how poorly it was put up in the first place. Normally I was pretty handy... I put up my own garage door operator for example. But changing the spring almost cost me my head. No joke.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 May 2006 01:59:03 GMT, "Art"

<snip>
All this talk about garage doors kind of has me wondering... Another method of opening a garage door would be some sort of counterweight system... You don't hear much about them though... Seems like they would be a simplier solution since the only thing that might break over the years would be the cable... Of course, it would probably be best to have multiple counterweights since a single one could be rather eventful if it broke...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Grumman-581 writes:

Possible but not practical versus extension or torsion springs.
A simple weight applies a constant force, which is not well matched to lifting a sectional door, which decreases in weight as it is lifted into the horizontal track. Springs happen to roughly match that proportionate behavior. While one can imagine a more complex system of weights that lifts proportionately to travel, it becomes Goldberg-esque.
You also have an inertia problem with weights that you don't have with springs. Garage doors are dangerous enough due to their moving mass, and you don't want to increase that.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 09 May 2006 23:34:16 -0500, Richard J Kinch

After posting that, I did a quick search on the net... It seems that there are a few doors that use a counterweight system, but they're rather specialty type of doors... I don't think any of them were the typical 4 section metal doors... There were some 2 section (i.e. bifold) ones where the top and the bottom of the door is in a vertical track and the pivot point projects outwards as the door is opened... Kind of like the door on my hangar, but it doesn't have a counterweight... I had a cable break on it once and it was a very interesting experience as it hit my boat and pushed it into me so that I was pinned against the wall... It's about a 40 ft wide by perhaps 20 ft tall metaL door... When it falls, it is *very* loud...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
*A simple weight applies a constant force, which is not well matched to lifting a sectional door, which decreases in weight as it is lifted into the horizontal track.*
Doors with counterbalance weights, commonly used in many carwashes, rely on the vertical lift type drums, snatch blocks and cable to offset the changes in weight as the door travels from a vertical position to horizontal. These doors are remarkably balanced throughout it's travel.
Rich ===================================Garage Door Parts, LLC 973-472-4818 http://www.garagedoorsupply.com ===================================

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 09 May 2006 23:34:16 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Bulky, maybe. All you need is a series of weights on the cable that hit the ground as the door opens. An anchor chain, for instance. Or an eccentric pulley somewhere in the sequence. I don't think the inertia problem is real... The weights contribute to the inertia of the door only when it's opening. When it's closing, if you block the door, the weights will just coast, adding slack to the cable. As for the dealing with snapped cables, you could add the sort of cable-de-activated brakes they use on elevators, where a loose cable allows (brake shoes?) to engage the track, while a tight cable pulls them clear.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Goedjn writes:

As I said, it is possible, just Goldberg-esque.
http://www.rubegoldberg.com /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 10 May 2006 23:19:41 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Neither of those solutions is particularly complicated, or mechanically unusual.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Goedjn writes:

You are lost in naivete.
The torsion spring pair for my 238 lb single car door weighs 17 lbs.
Your counterweights would weigh, oh, at least 238 lbs.
At $3/lb lately for hardware, you are suggesting upwards of $1000 for a mechanism that replaces $50 worth of springs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 May 2006 13:50:43 -0500, Richard J Kinch

How much does a cubic foot of concrete weigh, and how much does it cost?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mys Terry writes:

Not suitable as already explained. The naive idea was to use a metal chain.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 May 2006 14:03:04 -0500, Richard J Kinch

No it was not explained. You flatly said weights were not suitable, but that was more than adequately refuted.
Concrete with aggregate weighs aproximately 140 pounds per cubic foot. It's also dirt cheap. You said weight of around 238 pounds was needed. Concrete seems like an excellent and economical choice. Probably cheaper than your 17 pounds of springs. Lets see... you said that "hardware" costs around $3 a pound. so your springs would run $41. How much would 1.7 cubic feet (238 pounds) of concrete cost? Your wild statement about hardware costing $1000 being needed was as foolish and unsupportable as most of the things you post in usenet.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Mys Terry writes:

No. Already explained why a constant-force weight was unsuitable.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And it was already explained how easy it was to overcome that "problem". Are you really this dense, or do you just like to always be the loud contrarian at any cost?
Terry & Skipper, Clearlake Texas
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 11 May 2006 13:50:43 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Ah. So your complaint is based on the theory that "goldberg-esque" is a synonym for "expensive"?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.