Garage Door Sprng Snapped....How to repair?

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Extension spring at http://www.homedepot.com/prel80/HDUS/EN_US/diy_main/pg_diy.jsp?BV_SessionID=@@@@1143256003.1147141011@@@@&BV_EngineIDffaddhkegmgkhcgelceffdfgidgio.0&CNTTYPE=PROD_META&CNTKEY=misc/searchResults.jsp&MID76&N)84+3700&pos=n03
Measures 26.986 x 1.522
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Ahhh...Doug --
Its an extension sping door, not torsion spring door.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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Jim McLaughlin wrote:

Are these expansion springs or torsion?
If expansion on a single bay it shouldn't be too hard. Just as others have said the door must be safely blocked open. A neighbor damn near killed himself loosening a spring with the door closed.
When replacing a very large expansion spring on a very heavy double door I was having trouble trying to get it stretched adequately. Then I just hooked it up as best I could. Closed the door which expanded the spring several inches. I then put nails between the wrungs. Opened and braced the door again. It is now a few inches longer. Hooked it where I wanted. Closed the door and pulled out the nails.
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Rich256 wrote:

Had that same problem just last week when I replaced (for the second time in 20 years) both expansion springs on the garage door we open and close prolly five time a day. (The other one of our two garage doors gets opened maybe once a week and its original springs are still in place.)
I'd already torched and bent two new end loops on the last set of springs within the last year, so when one more end loop broke off I figgered it was time to spring for a new set again. (pun intentional.)
Say, has anyone evr seen a garage door expansion spring break anyplace other than at the bend for the end loop? I haven't. The working stresses are sure to be higher there than elsewhere along the spring, so I guess that's why. The new pair of springs I bought at home cheepo last week have their end loops bent out only about 45 degrees from the spring body, maybe that'll help them stay on longer.
With the door up as far as it could go, I couldn't quite stretch the 150 lb springs enough with one hand while standing on a step ladder to get the door cables over and into the pulley's groove with my other hand.
Then this idea hit me. I tied a piece of 3/16" plastic rope to the spring end loop and let 19 year old son stand about 10 feet outside the garage and pull on it. Worked slicker than snot on a brass doorknob, he could easily have stretched it another foot if needed.
Final blather for those who never stopped to think about this; A coil spring is just a torsion bar wound into a coil. The "springiness" comes from the spring wire twisting as the coil is stretched or compressed.
HTH,
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Jeff Wisnia wrote:

I just remembered that a friend told me how he got his springs stretched. Much better than mine. He called his neighbor who worked in construction and asked if he had anything to stretch them. The guy said yes and came right over. My friend said the guy was about 5 ft. 8 in. tall and about three feet wide with arm like logs. The guy took a hold of the spring, the veins in his neck and arms stood out and he stretched the spring and hooked it up.
The last time I purchased double sets of springs. They had a bracket that allowed two smaller springs on each side. Those I could stretch. However, I had to work about an hour adjusting the brackets because the combined springs were too strong and the door would not stay closed.
Mine always broke on the end. Someone I know had the spring go through the garage roof and land in his back yard (no safety cables).
Now I have torsion. Much safer.
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Glad to hear someone else uses a torch on their extension springs. I've done this for years with good results. Every spring that I've had break will do it at the same place - right in the area where the end of the spring was bent to form the loop used to attach the end of the spring to the attachment (an eye bolt in my case). I suspect that when these springs are manufactured, they aren't heated enough before the spring is bent to form the loop/hook. As with any spring steel, bending it to a small radius to form a nearly 90 degree bend will weaken/stress the steel at that point and that's where it will eventually break. I use a torch to heat that spot to red heat before rebending the hook on the end. Seems to work like a charm and those springs that I've heated and rebent are much less likely to break again at that spot, probably because the steel is well annealed at the bend.
On my garage doors, the extension spring is actually sagging from it own weight when the door is in the raised position, as I believe it should be. The motor has more than enough power to finish raising the door once two-thirds of the door has risen the horizontal position. When in the raised position, the springs are a piece of cake to remove and replace.
Harry

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Jim McLaughlin writes:

If you mean torsion springs, see:
http://www.truetex.com/garage.htm
Extension springs are available at hardware stores and will come with instructions.
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No, not the torsion spring type, where the spring runs parallel to the doo, but the other type, where the springs are perpindicular to the door and parallel to the "rails" taht the little wheels ride upon.
--
Jim McLaughlin

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"Jim McLaughlin" <jim.mclaughlin> wrote in message

Easy to do. You can buy them at any home center. Be sure to read the load rating as they differ from singe, double etc. Measure your door to get it right.
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You may not need to purchase a new spring if just the very end where the loop is broke off, I have repaired many garage doors by heating and turning one turn of the spring into a new loop for the end. Even a propane torch or gas range is sufficient as a heat source. These springs can kick you into next Tuesday so use some care in tensioning it.
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"You may not need to purchase a new spring if just the very end where the loop is broke off, I have repaired many garage doors by heating and turning one turn of the spring into a new loop for the end. Even a propane torch or gas range is sufficient as a heat source. These springs can kick you into next Tuesday so use some care in tensioning it." ____________________________________ Re; I wouldn't do that. On a 7 foot door, the typical extension spring is very near it's maximum design extension when the door is in the closed position. When you remove 3 or 4 inches of extendable spiral via the break and the formation of the new loop, you effectively require the spring to elongate past it's safe operating tension. If you try to remedy this by cable adjustment, then you will "run out of" tension before the door is fully up. This says nothing of the tension mismatch that would result between the two halves of the door. They're not that expensive; only $12 each or so.
Dan Akers
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D. Akers wrote:

Dan, while I agree with you in principle, I think you put a bit too much spin in your post.
Every garage door extension spring I've ever seen broken failed right where an end loop was bent off the body of the spring, as expected.
When I torch them and form a new end loop I am careful to use as little of the active spring as possible, which means I remove no more than one active coil to create the new end loop.
I just counted the coils on one of the new pair of 150 pound springs I installed on one of my 7 foot single width garage doors last week. There's 145 active turns in it.
Using one turn to make a new loop removes less than 0.7% of the active turns which is about 3/4" when fully extended, not the 3 or 4 inches you mentioned, and I won't believe the designers left that little safety margin there.
I've ALWAYS used safety cables in the extension springs of the garage doors in every home I've owned, knowing that those springs will eventually break. When an end loop snaps off it's faster for me to form a new one than to make a shopping trip.
I've never had one of the end loops I've made break, but when the OTHER loop breaks off the same spring that's when I feel it's time to give in and buy a new pair of springs. You're right about the low cost, the ones I bought last week at Home Depot cost $13.95 each and came with brand new safety cables too.
FWIW, I've never readjusted the cable lengths on the door we mostly use, it's always balanced well enough after I've relooped or replaced springs on it. The other door, which we only open about once a week, has never suffered a spring break.
But, I just measured the springs with the doors closed and on both of our home's doors there's about an inch of difference in the stretched lengths of its springs, either as set by the original installers 21 years ago or perhaps the result of uneven stretching of the cables since then.
Jeff
--
Jeffry Wisnia

(W1BSV + Brass Rat '57 EE)
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Jeff wrote: "I just counted the coils on one of the new pair of 150 pound springs I installed on one of my 7 foot single width garage doors last week. There's 145 active turns in it. Using one turn to make a new loop removes less than 0.7% of the active turns which is about 3/4" when fully extended, not the 3 or 4 inches you mentioned, and I won't believe the designers left that little safety margin there." ____________________________________ Re; For what it's worth: According to the cardboard sleeve on the 100lb, 26", springs I purchased, the maximum extension is 44 inches and the manufacturer warns against exceeding that extension for safety reasons. It takes about 42 inches of extension to service a 7 ft. door; that leaves just two inches of margin.
Dan Akers
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Older springs are usually stretched a bit which is why this works.
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Jim wrote: "Standard single bay ovehead garage door. One spring snapped. Spring's body is 26" long x 1 1/2 inch diameter. How does one goi about replacing these things?" ___________________________________ Re: I just replaced the extension springs on both of my garage doors about two months ago after one broke; they were 11 years old. It was easy and not dangerous; if done right. First you need to know what size spring you need. There will, most likely, be what looks like an errant spray of paint on one end of the spring or the other. This is the spring's color code that tells you what the full extension tension of the spring is. It is critical that you install the correct springs for your door. It is also critical that you replace both at the same time for balanced tension. Presumably, the original was correct if the door operated correctly. If you can't find the color code on the old spring, then you can take the unbroken one to a home center or hardware store and do a comparison. Find one of equivalent relaxed length and diameter. To compare tension constants (known as Hook's Constant) attach the old spring in series with a new spring and pull from one end of the combo with the other anchored or held by another person; thus the same tension is in both springs. If the new spring is a match, it will extend (increase in length), the same (or very nearly) as the old spring. Of course, if you know the weight of your door (it may be on the door manufacturer's label), you can simply buy that size of spring. Before replacing/installing the spring, the door needs to be fully up, with vice grips or C-clamps on both rails to prevent the door from falling. It is then just a simple matter of manipulating the hardware to install the spring. As other posters have said, the spring safety cable is critical. This is a cable that runs through the annulus of the spring and is securely anchored on both ends. This cable prevents the spring from causing damage and/or injury should it break in the future.
I got my parts and info from www.overheaddoorparts.com, you'll find the color code there as well.
Good luck, Dan Akers
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Get out the Yellow Pages and your Visa card.
Really.
Torsion springs are dangerous, and -- no offense intended -- replacing one is not a job for someone who needs to ask how to do it. Call a pro.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I NEED to repeat the above. Aperently you guys think that this is just another easy job for the do-it-yourselfer. NEVER EVER try to fix/replace torsion springs on garage doors, they can easily KILL you! Sorry to pop anyones bubble, but this is serious! I have delt with voltages of 30KV and above and still I would never try fixing these, they are just too dangerous! A slip of the hand and your dead, or even if you do everything right it may still maim you. Even specialized repairmen get maimed and killed doing this, the DIY way is not the best way this time!
A repairman is only a few hundred dollars, save yourself the hospital trip. Get a pro!
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Sorry to pop your bubble, but this is not a torsion spring, but a coil spring. READ the description.
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HVF writes:

Trade-toady bunk. By your logic, NEVER EVER try to:
Drive a car Climb a ladder Push a running lawnmower Go for a swim Encounter strangers on a sidewalk Cross a busy street etc.
Many worthwhile activities carry lethal hazards that are managed by careful qualification, knowledge and practice.
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they say , If gasoline were to be invented today, it would be out-lawed for the lay people to handle. gawd , it is dangerous!
--
I\'m unfettered,unbound,triumphant,glorious& splendid

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