garage ceiling insulation

I want to insulate the ceiling in my garage. The 2x6 joists are not 16" or 24" apart, but 20" apart. Any suggestions? Should I cut 24" wide insulation or use loose fill? I live in Illinois. Thanks for any suggestions Jerry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Smurfsdad wrote:

get the 24 ni. bats and let it squeeze in two inches on each side.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Do NOT do this. Insulation works because it traps air in between all the "stuff" that does the insulating, not the insulation medium itself. Compressed insulation is worthless.
Buy 24" batts and use a 2x4 or some other long straight edge to cut 4" of fiberglass out.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

insulation
What about doing blown, the depot will basically give you the machine if you buy enough bags. All you need is someone below to feed the machine. Might even be cheaper.
I have never heard of 20 inch on center framing especially in a ceiling. You measured center to center or edge to far edge ,,,right?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

It's probably actually 19 1/4", which is a moderately rare but acceptable spacing, that works out to 5 joists per 8' panel. (at least, there's a column for that on my joist-load tables.) Squeezing 24" batts into the spaces will work, but not as well as insulation that fits properly. For a garage, I wouldn't bother trimming bats. For a finished attic space, I might.
On the other hand, I wouldn't normally be insulating a garage, anyway.
--Goedjn
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 12:27:54 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@uri.edu"

Makes sense if it's an attached garage with living space overhead. Like at my house. Floors get REALLY COLD in the winter... socks and slippers are cheaper but don't help the resale value. For my situation, sounds like blown-in is easier (no new drywall for ceiling)?
Dr. M
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
remember to put a big plastic tarp for air infiltration and vapor barrier. Put it on the "warm" side. if the garrage is heated, then put the barrier down then the insulation... if not.. the other way around...
you can get plastic sheeting at most home improvement places.
--
be safe.
flip
Verso l'esterno! Verso l'esterno! Deamons di ignoranza.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I vote cellulose blown in. PJ
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I say blow the insulation in too, most places will lend you a blower if you buy enough insulation. I did my garage in Minnesota, it worked well. It's nice to be able to work in a heated garage when it's cold out. I can easily heat it when the outside temp is zero or above, below that, it gets to difficult, but it can be done. I have a 45k gas heater. 20x22 garage.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

You say 20" apart. That would mean 24" centers. You buy insulation made for 24" centers. It is cut to allow for the wood.
--
Ed
snipped-for-privacy@snet.net
http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.