Fridge temperatures, old thread wasn't clear enough.

My original posting appears to have been too general. Let me tighten the parameters.
I have a 2008 model Kenmore refrigerator with top freezer.
I have no experience with these newfangled high-deficiency R134a units.
If I were to attach an ACCURATE digital thermocouple meter to the pipe exiting the compressor heading for the condenser, about two inches from the compressor and let the system run for ten minutes at an ambient temperature of 60F,
Here's the QUESTION: What temperature should I measure????? End of SINGLE question.
A single number satisfies the question, but additional context relevant to system operating temperatures in old vs new technology would be helpful.
Yes, I have more questions, but I'm hoping I can get at least one answered to help determine if my fridge is going south. Thanks, mike
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wrote:

They are not really that different. They are just made out of two different kinds of wire/materials and are joined together at the very end of the probe. The only difference is in the mechanical makeup of the probe. The very tip where the wires are joined together is the only point that is being measured.
At work we use hundreds of them, maybe thousands. They are used in air, nitrogen, direct contact and in other materials. The same ones are used in all applications that are within the range of the J type or K type. We use them from about -20 deg C to + 500 deg C.
You can even just take the connecting wire and twist it together and get a close measurement where they are shorted together. The wire is usually made out of the same material as in the thermocouple.
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mike wrote:

At two inches from the compressor I think (but do not know) that the temperature won't be as cold as it is at the evaporator.
I would imagine that the only temperature that counts is the one inside the box.
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There are 4 places that the temperature matters on the lines.
But it is correct that the real test is inside the box.
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Ralph Mowery wrote:

Two inches from the output of the compressor should be the HOTTEST point in the system. Mine is 87F with 60F ambient. You'd know that if people wouldn't keep snipping all my input and replacing it with, "I know but I ain't tellin'" and "You're too stupid to measure temperature". Seems cool to me, hence the question about R134a systems.

More replies but still little useful info. The freezer was hot 23F. Turning down the thermostat made it more cold 0F. SOMETHING CHANGED over a short time, a few days till I noticed the ice cream was soft! SYMPTOMS SEEM INCONGRUENT. If the compressor cycles, not running continuously, shouldn't the thermostat have kept the (average) inside temperature constant independent of any thermodynamic changes in the refrigeration cycle? The symptom should have been longer run times. Why did temperature change significantly without significant change in run time? Can I learn anything about impending system failure from temperatures at various places in the refrigeration cycle? In particular, I'd expected the hottest part of the system to be hotter. I'D RATHER NOT WAIT UNTIL IT'S COMPLETELY DEAD.

I suppose if you knew those 4 places you'd be able to say where they are and what temperatures to expect in an R134a fridge. Right??? Any chance you'd consider actually answering my question by doing just that? I limited the scope of the question to one temperature because the newsgroups have difficulty addressing even one precise question. But I'd appreciate all four locations and temps...please.
Let me worry about whether I can measure temperature.

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Have you shut the entire refrigerator/freezer down for 4 to 6 hours to totally defrost anything that might have an ice build-up and then start over again? It sure sounds like something is wrong besides the compressor/evaporator system.
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