frequent pump runs

Page 2 of 2  
On Monday, August 19, 2013 10:10:14 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The submersibles as well as bladder tanks took a _lot_ of routine maintenance out of the system. Not much needs doing on a modern well anymore until something goes wrong.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/20/2013 12:10 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That's pretty unusual geology; there's never been any water table here except the Ogallala that's roughly 200 ft or deeper.
Farther east where there's surface-fed aquifers they may have some shallower wells.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, August 20, 2013 6:06:36 PM UTC-4, dpb wrote:

Here in central NJ, there is one at around 50 ft. Next one is around 100, then 180 or so. It's really funny too. Here's what happens. Folks from the city move here and want a green lawn. So, they call up a well driller. Virtually every one of them winds up with a well at 100ft. The only thing is, it's full of iron. So, within year, the sidewalks, patios, pool decks, side of the house, front steps, etc are all orange from rust. It's one of the craziest things going on. There is more water at 100 ft, than at 50. But usually there is plenty of water, eg 15 gpm, at 50 ft and no iron. Yet, for some reason, these guys just go for the 100ft.
A friend of mine had one put in a couple years ago. His at 50 ft is one of the few in the neighborhood that doesn't have the rust problem, because I told him what to do. Makes no sense, because these folks would pay the same amount or more for a well without the rust problem. I'm guessing the issue might be that the well drillers prefer to put in a well that they know will have plenty of water, even if it's bad, rather than run the risk that after they put a 50ft one in, the people bitch because it won't deliver enough water.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tuesday, August 20, 2013 3:06:36 PM UTC-7, dpb wrote:

Here in Eastern Washington (the Palouse) we have a very good shallow aquife r but odd geology - basically hundreds of feet of Loess soil blown in after the ice ages. I live in the bottom of a shallow valley containing my hous e, a highway, a year round ditch (usually, does dry up some years, headwate r about a mile up valley). On my side of the highway I drilled a well: 24 gpm at 60ft, community well and house 1/4 mile downstream from me that used to support 4 families, shallow well with a shallow well pump (not a jet), plenty of water. 1/2 mile up from me neighbor drilled a new well that ran over the top of th e casing when they hit the aquifer. He said it ran for four days before he capped it.
Then on the opposite of the highway directly across from me is one house. It was on a windmill pump and cistern. Replaced with electric pump/tank - not enough flow. Drilled new well and got a 4gpm total accumulation after going through 3 seams (I was spectating while they were drilling) I don't r ecall the depth but they used every piece of drill pipe on the rig. Up fro m him a mile was on a sping with low flow, drilled well, same story: barely enough for flow to support the house barn.
My well (24gpm/60 ft) and neighbor across the stream (4gpm over 90ft) are s eparated by no more than 200 ft.
Harry K
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/19/2013 11:48 AM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I took one apart recently that was similar to your description. In that one the widget had a diaphragm. One side of the diaphragm connected to the jet venturi, which was attached to the associated pump (shallow well). The other side the diaphragm was an air pump with check valves for air to the tank and for air into the pump. Not obvious why there is a pressure difference between the pump and tank when it cycles which is required to operate the air pump.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 18 Aug 2013 09:19:16 -0400, Frank

Well, if the pump power-on pressure is 40 psi, most people would set the empty tank bladder pressure to about 37 psi. I'm not sure what happens if you do that.

That seems like a lot. How do you know the tank really needed replacing and not just a recharge?
--
Web based forums are like subscribing to 10 different newspapers
and having to visit 10 different news stands to pickup each one.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/18/2013 12:48 PM, CRNG wrote:

The other tanks were leaking externally. Well water around here can be tough on systems. We usually get about 7 years out of an electric hot water heater and sometimes get pinhole leaks in pipes although I have not seen one in several years. Well is working fine and not rapidly recycling. If it did, I would check pressure as I imagine bladder like a car tire would slowly lose air pressure.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A little bit of Googling shows that the FL7 is a 22-gallon tank.
If you're interested, ask, and I'll post the details of how I got to this figure... but I calculate that with your on/off pressures at 40/60, you can withdraw *no more than* 5.9 gallons from the tank before the pump kicks on.
If you have a 5-gallon toilet, I'd expect the pump to come on nearly every time you flush it, about 17 times out of every 20. That is perfectly normal.
If the toilet uses less water than 5 gallons per flush, this is *not* normal. For example, if it's a 1.6-gallon toilet, you should expect that, on average, the pump would run about one flush in every four.
So before anyone can tell you (as some have tried to) that your pressure tank is definitely waterlogged, you need to tell us:
(a) How much water the toilet uses per flush (should be marked inside the tank)
(b) What happens if you flush the toilet, wait for the toilet to fill *and* for the pump to stop running, then flush it again? Does the pump kick on before the toilet fills, or not?
(c) How often does the pump run in one hour if nobody is using any water at all? Any answer other than zero means you have a leak somewhere; the higher the number, the worse the leak.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<stuff snipped>

That's a good test because it eliminates any potential slow leak.

Also a good test. Both need to be performed to determine if there really is a leak.
--
Bobby G.




Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The main reason it's a good test is that you *know* that the tank is as full of water as it's going to get when you perform it, and you *know* how much water will be withdrawn from the tank -- which means that you *know* that the pump _should not run_ (assuming a 5-gallon or less flush) -- which in turn means that if the pump does run, then you know the tank is waterlogged.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
http://tinyurl.com/kkpo9rb
--
nestork


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
replying to nestork , mcdonnep wrote:

Thanks for all of the advice. I am going to shut off the water, drain the tank, and reset the precharge on the tank to 38 psi. I will report back. thanks to all.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 8/19/2013 11:44 AM, mcdonnep wrote:

While you've got the tank drained and open, pressurize a little over final setpoint and let sit for a little while and see if forces any additional water out.
Also, while empty, check for whether there is still water in the tank--do you know for certain whether it is a bladder or diaphragm style tank?
--



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.