For Any "Motor Expert"

Hello,
Not a motor expert, but just very curious, and would like to learn.
Have a home food blender. Works on regular wall outlet.
Motor has armature windings. Also has field (stator) windings.
Also has a commutator.
What kind of a motor is this ?
Advantages of a motor like this compared to perhaps a regular ac induction motor ?
Have never seen a commutator on an ac motor before. Is there a rectifier hidden somewhere ?
Thanks, Bob
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On Sunday, October 4, 2015 at 3:01:27 PM UTC-5, Bob wrote:

Most good quality mixers will have a brush motor...for their size they have more power. Large commercial units mostly have capacitor start or DC motors.
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On 10/04/2015 04:12 PM, bob_villa wrote:

You didn't answer any of the OP's questions.
Maybe someone who actually knows the answers will come along.
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user04 wrote:

It's called a universal motor , and it will run on either AC or DC . There are 2 flavors of universal motor , series wired or shunt wired . I don't remember why each is more desirable for certain tasks .
--
Snag



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wrote:

infinite RPM - there is no "running soeed" - it will keep gaining speed with no load untill it blows up. A shunt wound motor has a running speed where the supply voltage and the CEMF balance out - the motor will draw current as required to maintain that speed under any load - and if not externally limited it will burn itself out trying to maintain that speed.
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On 10/4/2015 1:44 PM, Terry Coombs wrote:

It's almost definitely series wound. They're good for high speed *and* being able to vary speed by varying the applied voltage (e.g., with something akin to a "dimmer circuit")
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On 10/4/2015 1:51 PM, Don Y wrote:

To be more explicit: an AC induction motor runs at a speed determined by the motor's winding geometry (which is fixed at time of manufacture) and the frequency of the AC voltage applied. Varying the speed is done either with mechanical gearboxes *or* a VFD (Variable Frequency Drive).
For small household appliances (drills, blenders, etc.) that desire some sort of speed variation, an induction motor is impractical: the electronics required to vary the frequency are more complex (than simply varying the voltage)
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On Sunday, October 4, 2015 at 3:32:59 PM UTC-5, user04 wrote:

Okay nymshifter!
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possible because it has a wound fiels - the polarity of both rotor and field change together. A permanent magnet motor can NOT run on AC because the field can't switch polarity - the motor just buzzes.
Universal motors have the brush angle a bit different than straight DC motors to reduce brush sparking/burning - but they are fundamentally the same.
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