Flexible Gas Line Hose Question

Hello:
This is a question I asked more as an afterthought to another one I posted a while ago regarding the desireability of gas shut off valves in a residence.
But, I have started really thinking about it a bit, and would like to pose it as it's own question, as I feel I would like to know about it before doing any work on the gas line valve installations I am planning.
Regarding gas appliances like clothes dryers and gas stoves: is it customary these days that they be connected with a short length of flexible gas hose (not sure what the right term is), or are they still normally connected rigidly to the gas pipe like the house we are moving into (about 25 yrs old) ?
Should I have them changed ?
Anything rigid like this tends to scare me; I cannot help but feel a flexible hose is a really good idea, but I really don't know how necessary, or desireable, it is ?
BTW: what's a flexible gas line hose called ? Is it safe ?
What certifications should it have ?
Thanks, Bob
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know the legal or safety implications.
I have propane gas for the kitchen stove, hot water heater and dryer. The dryer and hot water heater use flex gas line attached to copper tubing. I have not had a problem with it since it was installed in 1988. Steve
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is Turtle.
First check with your city inspector on gas flex hoses or you must have rigit pipe hook ups. Check them out first.
Check you appliance hook ups and if they do have flex gas hose hook ups. If the hoses are brass colored you must change them out to a grey plastic covered brass or Stainless steel. I use only Stainless Steal to hook up furnaces and heaters but the grey brass cover ones are ok. Now I have never heard of any inspector turning down a hard pipe hook up but one time on a moble home propane hook up on a propane bottle but none on homes.
TURTLE
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If they are old and possibly brass colored there have been quite a few fires caused by them rotting out. Look into it, it is a real saftey issue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes, our local gas utility issued a mandatory replacement notice for those maybe 3 or 4 years ago. They could also be enameled (some were grey) too. They had to be replaced with SS flex lines and only SS is allowed to be installed on new installations.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Check your local codes.
At one time where I lived flex was not allowed (except for stoves) as over time it would flex a lot from vibration and could leak. Tubing has improved over the years and codes may have changed. OTOH, is some earthquake prone regions I understand it is required to have flex. .
As for being scared, millions of homes and industries are hard piped with gas. Explosions do happen, but are very rare.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I believe the copper flex tubing was specifically marked as not re-usable by the manufacturer. The newer stuff might be re-usable, but for what it costs I'd replace it when replacing the appliances.
--
Regards,

Jerry Schwartz
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.