Flaking paint on cellar floor

When we ripped up our basement's old wood floor, we found the concrete painted red. But the paint comes off easily as red dust, easily tracked onto the now-carpeted rooms (and incredibly attractive to our white cat, who rolls on it until pink all over). Any easy way to solve the problem?
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When we ripped up our basement's old wood floor, we found the concrete painted red. But the paint comes off easily as red dust, easily tracked onto the now-carpeted rooms (and incredibly attractive to our white cat, who rolls on it until pink all over). Any easy way to solve the problem?
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Ivan wrote:

Solution 2: Lock up the cat, while you get fixing primer from a paint shop, and treat the floor with that. finish: Then get 2 component floor paint, used for garage floors and such. Lock up the cat, while you apply that. Last: Free the cat(wait until the floor dries....). (or dont wait if you dislike the cat, (eeeh.. I did not say that,disregard.)
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A 2 part epoxy floor finish should lock down all the loose stuff you can't pick up with a shop vac.
Joe
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Get a floor refinisher guy , have him remove it with buffer with coarse grit of a black pad and clean it before repainting it. Cleaning it off should be cheap, maybe 200$ for 600 sq ft, or rent a floor machine at HD and DIY , but it will cost more to do
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May or may not work, but you might try some "floor stripper" sold in large buckets at Lowe's (and presumably other Big Boxen.) I had some old, peeling, painted-over vinyl floor tiles in my basement and that stuff actually did a decent job of getting up the adhesive as well as a lot of the paint that was on bare concrete (apparently some equipment was removed after the floor was tiled but before it was painted over.) I did not use according to directions, that didn't work, but using it straight cut only with a little hot water and a scrub brush did the trick. Don't even think about it unless you have opening windows in the basement, unless you like losing brain cells.
good luck
nate
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How old is the house? Any idea how long ago the floor was painted?
Sorry to have bring this up, but I'd be concerned about lead paint.
(I have a client who was a minority co-owner of a rental property for 1 year back in 1991. Now, 20 years later, she has been named in a law suit because the family claims their child was harmed by the lead paint used on the porch.)
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wrote:

How old is the house? Any idea how long ago the floor was painted?
Sorry to have bring this up, but I'd be concerned about lead paint.
(I have a client who was a minority co-owner of a rental property for 1 year back in 1991. Now, 20 years later, she has been named in a law suit because the family claims their child was harmed by the lead paint used on the porch.) -------------------------------------------------------------------------
Thank goodness for things like laches* and statutes of limitation. Unless there was substantial fraud in the conveyance (as in they have a video of him chuckling to a neighbor "I unloaded that death trap on those suckers") my opinion is that the case will be dismissed as soon as someone's attorney files the proper motions. It's served the Catholic Church better than anyone else. (-:
*Vigilantibus non dormientibus quitas subvenit. (Equity helps the vigilant, not those who sleep) It's a principle, that along with codified SoL's, that says "You snooze, you lose." When you wait so long to bring a case that witnesses have died, moved or gone senile, the law does not look fondly on your claims. I know about this because I filed a case on the day before the SoL was about to expire (I was but one party of many in a huge fire lawsuit with loads of litigants.
When the opposing party asserted laches, I pointed out that the case had gone on almost three years yet there wasn't even a court date set. Had I joined earlier, I would have just been paying legal fees for basically nothing (motion and discovery BS). By waiting, I had free access to all the evidence gathered by insurance company attorneys without having to pay for it. The judge agreed that since my part in the case was small and my identity and damages were well known to the opposing party from day one, laches did not apply. Agreeing with the opposing counsel that I was sleeping (which made my heart skip a beat or two!) he pointed out that laches did not apply because I was sleeping with one eye opened. Still cost me plenty for an attorney, but nowhere near as much as it would have if we had joined from day one. It took FIVE YEARS for the case to end.
-- Bobby G.
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In this case, couldn't that depend on when it was determined that the child was harmed by the exposure to lead paint?
Perhaps (and I don't have any clue, so I'm just hypothesizing) the "child" (now 20-ish I guess) recently went for some test or another and they said "Holy crap! He's got more lead in his system than a #2 pencil!"
So Mom goes: "Well, that explains why he's such an idiot. Time to call an attorney."
There is some thought that the family is suing anyone and everyone involved in the situation in the hopes that *somebody* will have an insurance company with deep pockets willing to pay up.
(BTW...My client isn't really worried about it costing her anything, but until it goes away the stress is bearing down on her. When she got divorced, which ended her part of the co-ownership, it was specifically noted in the divorce agreement that the ex-husband would be fully liable for any and all issues regarding the property, whether or not they occurred while she was a co-owner. On the flip side, he would also gain from anything "beneficial" regarding the property, whether or not the benefit could be traced to something that happened while she was a co-owner. She was basically cutting all ties related to the property (and him))
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House was built in 1958
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My second question is just as - if not more - important than the first...and it's not me that needs the answer, it's *you*.
"How long ago the floor was painted?"
Check out this site, found via a simple Google search on lead paint. Scroll down to the bottom for the answer to "4. Do I have lead-based paint in my house?"
http://www.fiberquant.com/lead.htm
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