fixing laudry room wall

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On Monday, July 1, 2013 8:45:24 AM UTC-4, leza wang wrote:

c). Thanks once again really appreciate it.
Did you see my post about replacing the window with glass block? Just in ca se you didn't:
One possible fix for the window is to remove the old frame, get down to goo d block and mortar in a 2” thick patio block to create a flat surface for a glass block window. The patio block (or 2?) may give you the height you need to keep the water out.
And guess what? You can get a dryer vent designed to fit in a glass block w indow. Here's just one example.
http://www.starkglassblock.com/m_photogallery_photo.asp?idv
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On Friday, June 28, 2013 5:22:29 PM UTC-4, leza wang wrote:

see video below)

is not drywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts fr om middle until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the butto n) need to be removed to install new drywall.

ing a drywall and cut it to cover that area and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very similar to what i did in the following vi deo but the board will be bigger (higher) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them.

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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 14:22:29 -0700 (PDT), leza wang

I was wrong. It really is a hole. I could see a red panda peeking out. You live in DC, right?

A lot of workmen like to do things right. Even I like to do things right, but you have to make a choice between doing it right and doing it basement ugly. It's not like your guests will be checking behind the washing machine.
If your wall is wet, you can't paint it with UGL waterproofing paint. Follow the directions. It works. It's almost a miracle. The one problem is that if there is enough water and it can't get in where you've painted, it may come in somewhere to the left or right. But if it's just a little dampness, and that's what the damage looks like to me, I'd just use UGL.
IIRC you can paint anything with it, cinder block, cement, stones. YOu can paint sheet rock, but you should paint the side that faces the wall. If you paint the side t hat faces the room, the whole other side and inside will get wet and it will fall apart.

Looks good to me. You should probably paint the wood on all sides so that moisture doesn't damage it much.

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On Friday, June 28, 2013 4:22:29 PM UTC-5, leza wang wrote:

ase see video below)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M91IraGxkc8
One cont ractor came and said that area in the wall is not isolated and it is not dr ywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts from middle until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the button) need to be removed to install new drywall. I am thinking about quick and more cost effect solution. I thought of buying a drywall and cut it to cover that ar ea and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very similar to what i did in the following video but the board will be bigger (higher) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them. https://www.you tube.com/watch?v=6qZvPxKf9Rs is that good idea? Went to Home depot and fo und they have the following 1) dry wall 2)tile backer (dens shield) 3) ceme nt board 4) cgc gypsum board 5) fiberock panel Which board should I use in this case Thanks a lot.
Tom R's suggestion about a piece of clear plastic all along the outside bot tom of the laudry room sounds like a good idea. Just get all the surfaces where you will be applying the silicone rubber sealant very clean so that t he rubber is against something solid, not a layer of dirt which will allow leakage.
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Thanks, but I just meant a piece of clear plastic (such as Lexan) across where the window is rather than along the whole wall. That should keep water from getting in where the window is and, in effect, allow water to puddle up in front of the window without getting into the window. The same thing could be done by building a small cement wall across the front of the window, but I found the clear piece of lexan to look better and works fine.
Then, I would just do caulking along the rest of the wall where the concrete/cement slab meets the brick wall to keep water from getting in through that seam.

True.
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On Saturday, June 29, 2013 2:57:13 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

lease see video below)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M91IraGxkc8
One co ntractor came and said that area in the wall is not isolated and it is not drywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts from middl e until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the button) need to be removed to install new drywall. I am thinking about quick and more co st effect solution. I thought of buying a drywall and cut it to cover that area and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very simil ar to what i did in the following video but the board will be bigger (highe r) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them. https://www.y outube.com/watch?v=6qZvPxKf9Rs is that good idea? Went to Home depot and found they have the following 1) dry wall 2)tile backer (dens shield) 3) ce ment board 4) cgc gypsum board 5) fiberock panel Which board should I use i n this case Thanks a lot.

ottom of the laudry room sounds like a good idea. Just get all the surface s where you will be applying the silicone rubber sealant very clean so that the rubber is against something solid, not a layer of dirt which will allo w leakage.
Are you aware the bottom of the laundry room is about 8 feett below grade? I don't think screwing around with plastic is worth the effort. This is one of those things that you either fix right, or it's going to be problems forever. It's more work to do it right, but then you don't have to keep screwing with it, because the half measures don't work.
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On Saturday, June 29, 2013 6:59:06 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

(please see video below)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M91IraGxkc8
One contractor came and said that area in the wall is not isolated and it is no t drywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts from mid dle until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the button) nee d to be removed to install new drywall. I am thinking about quick and more cost effect solution. I thought of buying a drywall and cut it to cover tha t area and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very sim ilar to what i did in the following video but the board will be bigger (hig her) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them. https://www .youtube.com/watch?v=6qZvPxKf9Rs is that good idea? Went to Home depot an d found they have the following 1) dry wall 2)tile backer (dens shield) 3) cement board 4) cgc gypsum board 5) fiberock panel Which board should I use in this case Thanks a lot.

bottom of the laudry room sounds like a good idea. Just get all the surfa ces where you will be applying the silicone rubber sealant very clean so th at the rubber is against something solid, not a layer of dirt which will al low leakage.

?

ms

So i should not do the Lexan stuff?
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On Fri, 28 Jun 2013 14:22:29 -0700 (PDT), leza wang

BTW, I too think probably if that grill work on the dryer output extends beyond the 4" circle, you can remove the grill and a lot of right-angle tubes will fit.
I would try to use the one that takes up the least space, since your laundry room seems pretty crowded as it is. So if it works, the plastic right angle seems, afaict, to use less space then the metal one.
OTOH, a while back a url posted here showed, as a sketch, not real life, an especially flush right angle that wasted no space going backwards and started "up" immediately, with the dryer connecting to the side of it.. I don't know for sure that they make such a thing in reality, and I don't know if it would fit your dryer and not be obstructed by something else on the dryer, but that would be the thing to have if they sell it.
My house came with the flexible, temporary 4" hose connecting it to the outside vent. I think the previous owner didn't know any better (He did a lot of things wrong.) But iirc, it uses less space between the dryer and the wall than does the proper metal or plastic right angle. The flexible is not good becasue lint collects on the constant non-smooth parts of the hose, and it's a fire hazard, especially if you use your dryer on higher heat settings. But I checked 15 years in and the hose was empty of lint. Now it's 30 years and I'm assuming it still is. There is a healthy breeze coming out of the far end. And I always use the lowest heat setting, because I think it's better for the clothes. Nothing shrinks and the sta-press doesn't get wrinkles. And it might save electricirty.
Of course I live alone and use mostly sta press (I don't like all cotton, and I certainly dont' think it feels literally cooler. I think it's hotter, and so are t-shirts) , so 30 years for me might be 6 years for a family.
P&M
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On Friday, June 28, 2013 4:22:29 PM UTC-5, leza wang wrote:

ase see video below)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M91IraGxkc8
One cont ractor came and said that area in the wall is not isolated and it is not dr ywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts from middle until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the button) need to be removed to install new drywall. I am thinking about quick and more cost effect solution. I thought of buying a drywall and cut it to cover that ar ea and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very similar to what i did in the following video but the board will be bigger (higher) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them. https://www.you tube.com/watch?v=6qZvPxKf9Rs is that good idea? Went to Home depot and fo und they have the following 1) dry wall 2)tile backer (dens shield) 3) ceme nt board 4) cgc gypsum board 5) fiberock panel Which board should I use in this case Thanks a lot.
I meant the idea of a clear piece of plastic all along the bottom outside e dge of the window, not the bottom on the inside.
I would consider putting the dryer vent 4" diameter hole along the side of the upper part of the window, that way the vent sould be 10 - 15" above the outside ground level. I would use a screened vent to keep critters out. I don't think there were termite tunnels behid the sheetrock/drywall that wa s removed, the termites would have been going up to get at wood not down to the concrete floor. I would use a wire brush to scrub on the inside wall behind where the drywall was removed before painting with a drylock style p aint, to give the paint a good clean dust and debris-free surface to grab o n to.
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On Sunday, June 30, 2013 6:36:10 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

lease see video below)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M91IraGxkc8
One co ntractor came and said that area in the wall is not isolated and it is not drywall but somewhere in the middle of that wall, drywall starts from middl e until the window. he said that area (from the middle to the button) need to be removed to install new drywall. I am thinking about quick and more co st effect solution. I thought of buying a drywall and cut it to cover that area and that will provide a support to existing wall. I will be very simil ar to what i did in the following video but the board will be bigger (highe r) so it will meet with another dry wall and then screw them. https://www.y outube.com/watch?v=6qZvPxKf9Rs is that good idea? Went to Home depot and found they have the following 1) dry wall 2)tile backer (dens shield) 3) ce ment board 4) cgc gypsum board 5) fiberock panel Which board should I use i n this case Thanks a lot.

edge of the window, not the bottom on the inside.

f the upper part of the window, that way the vent sould be 10 - 15" above t he outside ground level. I would use a screened vent to keep critters out. I don't think there were termite tunnels behid the sheetrock/drywall that was removed, the termites would have been going up to get at wood not down to the concrete floor. I would use a wire brush to scrub on the inside wal l behind where the drywall was removed before painting with a drylock style paint, to give the paint a good clean dust and debris-free surface to grab on to.
You don't solve water problems by first resorting to Drylock. From the video, there is a serious problem OUTSIDE and no amount of Drylock is going to fix that.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

Hi, Fix the cause, not the symptom. I am a strong believer of do it first time right and forget long time. Start with water drainage around house perimeter. Is the yard graded right? Does the down spouts discharge water right? Is there any weeping tile around basement foundation?
No neighbors to give a hand or some useful advice? No help from local HD store staff? Our neighborhood HD store has many retired trades people with good knowledge and experience. No. 1 rated in the country for good service and customer satisfaction. To get a good answer, one has to ask a good question. LOL.
I never lived in a pre-owned house. Always had one built for my family. 5 times over the years. I know every thing about my house with a set of blue prints I keep. When I sell the house the blue prints and history of any "good to know" documented maintenance record is turned over to new owner.
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