Electricity consumption

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On Tue, 15 Mar 2011 20:49:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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80? They're talking 30, maybe 50.

Yup. There's enough that I can be choosy.

Why would you need A/C and lights? Luxury! Heat?
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wrote:

day. At a lot less than 30 MP
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Nope. In my town, the average commute is 21 miles. http://www.downtownhouston.org/site_media/uploads/attachments/2010-04-22/9A-2009_Downtown_Houston_Commute_Survey_Report.pdf
And we only ranked 15th. http://www.bizjournals.com/houston/stories/2005/03/28/daily26.html
Car commuters average 100 minutes per day (milage unknown) http://askville.amazon.com/average-commuting-distance-americans/AnswerViewer.do?requestId%54434
If you use your car to commute, take a short hop for lunch, and pick up some day-old fish for dinner on the way home, you can easily hit the electric car's endurance limit.
Then you're stuck with a dead car and a very dead fish.
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wrote:

speeds. If I was doing it today, the same batteries would give me at least 70 miles. Higher tech charging would also cut my charge time significantly, allowing"opportunity charging". And it would cost me a bit more than the $2000 my old fiat cost.
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On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 21:27:34 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I looked into the kit for my Prelude (a $ 4,000+ Civic kit) and they had 14 golf cart batteries with the expectation of 50 miles or so at 45 MPH with new batteries. From my golf cart experience, in 3-4 years you can half that and it really starts dropping off fast after that. My cart batteries are 5 years old and I worry about getting around the neighborhood (1-2 miles). It is slowing down by then.
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On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 14:00:44 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

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wrote:

Fiat) and I'd use a more efficient controller. Back then, anything that met that description was very expensive and complicated compared to what is available today. I'd also use a better charger (mine was a surplus Sebring Vangard charger, which was only 24 volts so I had to parallel the 2 24 volt strings for charging). I'd most likely also run higher voltage(72 volts minimum, possibly 96)
My current EVs are 2 wheeled. If I could get a Honda GL500 cheap I'd make a real electric motorcycle using the motor I first used in the FIAT.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

now you are talking!
I've been kicking around idea of electric cycle myself!
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I'd like to see the studies. Most of them that I have looked at tossing around those figures usually look only at commutes and not all the other messin' around that has to be done. Another part of the electric car that is being ignored is the likely lifespan. Something like 60% of cars and trucks in the US are 6 years and older, with the highest single group (38.3%) over 10. Electric cars are going to need about $4000 worth of new batteries ever 4 or 5 years. No way is anybody going to do this more than once (even if the costs go down substantially, it just won't make sense to put such a high percentage of the cost of a new one into the old one). I have yet to see anyone (either fer it or agin it) take into account the environmental costs of tossing cars out more quickly, or for that matter, the environmental costs of just replacing the batteries. And that doesn't even begin to address the costs associated with fewer older cars being available to the poorer groups who tend to drive the older cars.
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
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wrote:

They want those people to ride the bus. Only rich people should have cars and they should be very expensive. That is the plan.
It is why the cult religion of "environmentalism" is a rich person's folly.
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On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 12:59:10 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Only the ruling class should have cars (and dachas).

Except that they haven't figured out that they won't be part of the ruling class.
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On Wed, 16 Mar 2011 18:22:03 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

They want to eat the rich.
We saw this in 1917
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wrote:

Au cantraire, mon frere, since there are no transmission or engine issues, replacing batteries several times in the life of the car makes perfect sense. And it CAN still be more economical than an ICE vehicle.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Since the mid 80s I have had cars an average of 15 years (if you include the time my kids use my hand me downs). Over all that time, the only engine and transmission concerns were changing fluids and filters. The battery costs I have seen so far run around $3-4K. That is going to be a REAL hefty part of a 4-5 y/o car's worth (like probably pretty close to all of it). Even at the best case of $800 or so, it will not make econ sense.
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
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On Thu, 17 Mar 2011 10:24:43 -0700, Smitty Two

I couldn't make the numbers come out right using a kit with a lead acid battery array (based in $4 gas)
The problem is, if you just want a low performance car to buzz around town, you can buy a new Versa for $8,000, get real good mileage and still be able to take it on trips, I would still need a real car if I wanted to get more than 30-40 miles away and count on being able to get home. If you took the remaining $32,000 (vs a Volt) and put it in the bank, you would still be money ahead buying gas a quarter of a million miles later (based on 32MPG and $4 gas)
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In article

True, but I doubt many people look at it that way, especially in an older car. They only look what the immediate out-of-pocket will be and what is the expected life.
--
"Even I realized that money was to politicians what the ecalyptus tree is to
koala bears: food, water, shelter and something to crap on."
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wrote:

Electricity is free where you live?

You have some convincing to do, there.
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On Sun, 20 Mar 2011 19:45:20 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Why does he care if you can make it home? ;-)
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Kurt Ullman wrote:

The battery is warranted for 8 years/100,000mi. (I think it is a fed requirement.) GM predicts the battery should last the life of the car - 10+ years.
It is a different system and smaller battery, but the Prius has been around since 2001 (or 1997 in Japan). I haven't heard of battery failure problems.

Environmental cost of batteries? I believe they are NiMH. Is there an environmental problem?
I see no reason to believe you will be tossing cars out more quickly.
--
bud--


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