Electrician Help - Wiring for a Stove/Range


Hello -
I am renovating an older house and have decided to relocate the stove to the other side of the kitchen. The current wire that was in place was really short and close to the electrical box and all corroded from age. The wire was a think 6 gauge wire I think, with a red and black wire and then copper twisted around the red and black wire all within a mesh material.
I went to the store the other day to buy a replacement wire and bought a 6 gauge 2 wire piece thinking that the twisted copper was the ground, but after closer analysis, I don't think it was a ground wire at all. Is this possible? I think the wire had a common (twisted wire) and two hot wires. Should I have bought the 6 gauge 3 wire instead?
Do oven lines have a ground? Or do they now and didn't back then? Not a professional as you can probabley tell.
Thanks...
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Modern ranges will need:
1) A black +120V line
2) A red -120V line (red to black gives the 240V spread)
3) A white neutral line (to run items that need less voltage [120])
4) A green grounding line in case something goes wrong, it will cause stray voltage to flow freely and safely to the earth and cause the breaker to trip.
I recommend you get a few books on wiring from your library and perhaps a book or booklet on wiring principles from a hardware store or online. They're worth it and they'll pay for themself in no time and help keep you and your house safe.
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Thanks Mike. I have a couple sources, but yea, I need an updated book (with pictures...haha) to go by. I am not use to seeing wire that old I guess. I got a little confused.
So....I guess I should have bought the 6-3 wire. Darn....
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Old oven lines did not have a ground, they had a "uninsulated neutral" which served as both the neutral and the ground. Existing wiring is grandfathered, but new wiring must have an insulated neutral and a ground. You cannot legally install your 6/2.
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upgrade to 6 3 with ground current code safer and better
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Thanks guys....makes sense. I should have looked closer. Never saw a neutral "unshielded" before. I guess I am showing my age....or my knowledge with that comment.
No limit right? I have to go about 30 feet.
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If he is extending his existing circuit he can use the SE wire he bought. There is really nothing to connect the 4th wire to anyway. If you are coming from the panel then you would want the 4 wire and you would have to convert the range to a 4 wire cord.
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Yea, I wanted to go ahead and replace the existing wire. It was old, been nawed on by rodents and just plain frale. No stove yet, so when I buy a stove it is going to be a four prong plug huh?
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For your new range you'll need a four wire range outlet and cord set. You are better off using 6/3G romex as opposed to SER which you can probably only find in aluminum

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http://www.applianceaid.com/wirehelp.html
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jm:
What kind of panel does the wire go back to? Is it a breaker panel, or an old fuse box? You may have trouble finding somewhere to attach a #6 neutral as well as a #6 ground to, say, an old Wadsworth 60A fuse box.
Be aware that the innards of an old fuse box may have deteriorated over the years. Be very aware that, even if you pull out the main fuse block or turn the main breaker to OFF, the service wires (the large ones that come into the house) and the lugs, screws, and whatever attaches to them are all very much alive and capable of electrocuting you or explosively vaporizing the end of an insulated screwdriver, throwing bits of metal in your direction. It's very wise to wear goggles when working in a panel.
Also remember that the terminals must be properly tightened, neither too tight nor too loose.
Maybe you know all this stuff already. I just want to point out that wiring is not something that should be learned from the people at Home Despot, and it's better to learn this some way that doesn't involve making a big BANG and a blue flash.
Cordially yours: G P
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Thanks paw...
I got it wired this weekend. I believe the fuse box has been updated since the home was built, so all the wires fit beautifully.
In regards to being careful. I learned my lesson already and am super cautious now. I bumped a hot wire while on a ladder from a light switch that somebody turned on and got zapped pretty good.....ouch.
Thanks.
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