Electrical connection for generator (in fuse box) - info, docs or links wanted

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Anyone know of any good guides showing how to hook up a fuse box to accept a generator? I want to hook up a 4-wire, 220v 30A connection straight into the box to power the whole home (obviously not everything in it, just what I choose to turn on).
There should be some websites or documents out there which show what to do. I know much of what needs to be done, I just need to know the specifics.
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Our local utility (Dominion, Virginia) is marketing a switch that has a special connector that sits between the meter and the meter base. The "switch box" is mounted on the wall within reach of the cord connector (about 6').
"They" want $995 for it "installed." Since installation just means removing and replacing the meter and hanging up the box, I judge they price that hardware at $700+.
BUT, it's a neat solution to the problem.
In the same bill (they "market" when they send the monthly bill) "they" were selling gas generators for several times what you would pay for the same capacity at, say, Wal-Mart.
IMO, if you can get it, the "meter" base is the best solution. I don't have technical details (for example, will the switch have a remote control option or will it permit remote monitoring of whether the utility power has been restored) but the basic idea is sound and shows that the utility is addressing the problem in a realistic manner.

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"the utility is addressing the problem in a realistic manner." ???
Please forgive me. I can't resist ...
"You should not be overly alarmed to find that you are brainwashed. We are all brainwashed ..."
If your public service commission allows your utility to hustle bucks on such utilitys service failures, perhaps neither the psc nor such utility is addressing the basic and essential problem at all.
How much will such utility make if there are only 2 outages per year (about all that should be allowed)? How much will they make if there are 14 or 23 outages? Can you imagine a scenario in which the utilitys profit targets are dependent on the number of outages (above "normal") per year?
Beware, Al
"The monkey and the baboon was playing 7-up. The monkey won the money but he scared to pick it up. The monkey stumbled, mama. The baboon fell. The monkey grab the money and he run like hell!" - from "Dirty Motherfuyer", Roosevelt Sykes, around 1935
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You need to get an interlocking device that would only allow the generator feed or the utility company feed, but not both at the same time , power the panel. I know Square D makes them, but I'm not sure about other companies

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Any info or links on this?
I can understand what devices would need to do, BUT, I need to know just HOW to do it :)

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On Fri, 15 Jun 2007 13:36:49 -0500, "Apropos"

If you get an interlock device and you can free up the other 2 slots it needs you simply connect a MALE recepatcle near the generator connected to the appropriate breaker in the magic slots. You need a cable with a male on the generator end and a female on the house end. Just be sure you get the correct interlock kit and the interlock requires turning off the generator breaker before the main can be turned on and vice versa. If the breakers are not directly across from each other this will be the expensive kit. Safer is always to hire someone who is qualified.
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on 6/8/2007 7:47 AM Apropos said the following:

Even I, a one-time part-time house builder who has personally run many new circuits in my house, am not so stupid as to attempt this myself. Some things you don't f__k with if you have to ask for directions.
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Well, sometimes you pretty much know how but you prefer to see it spelled out and drawn out ;-)
At any rate, do you know anywhere which shows the procedure to hook up a generator feed IN to the fuse box, such that I can disconnect via the main, from the local utility?
It really doesn't seem that complicated. It's just the kind of thing you just don't want to get WRONG ... LOL
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Apropos wrote:

practice.
You need an interlocking device (transfer switch) to insure that the mains and generator can never be connected.
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George wrote:

George That is not correct. At least two manufacturers make interlock devices that are in fact add ons to the main distribution panel for the home. Just like the separate transfer switches these breaker interlock kits will prevent the generator supply from connecting with the outside lines. Since these interlock kits are laboratory listed they are in fact in accordance with the National Electric Code.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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Apropos wrote:

Except that your idea of disconecting from the grid by manually tripping the "MAIN" to off when you want to use the generator violates code, is damn dangerous and may kill a power company worker, exposes you to huge civil liability, is industrial strength STOOPID and is not, at all, apropos.

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jJim McLaughlin wrote:

The interlock kits manufactured by Square D and Cutler Hammer both work by tripping the main breaker to the off position manually, Moving the interlock manually, and closing the generators isolating breaker manually. These are listed devices so what are you on about.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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Well, sometimes you pretty much know how but you prefer to see it spelled out and drawn out ;-)
At any rate, do you know anywhere which shows the procedure to hook up a generator feed IN to the fuse box, such that I can disconnect via the main, from the local utility?
It really doesn't seem that complicated. It's just the kind of thing you just don't want to get WRONG ... LOL
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wrote:

xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
With apologies if you are more knowledgeable than it appears to me from the initial posting above.
Presuming you are talking about the situation where you hook up a generator for use during an extensive failure of the commercial power?
Reading this forum and elsewhere I have gathered that it is illegal (In almost all jurisdictions) because it it is unsafe, to hook up a standby generator WITHOUT COMPLETELY DISCONNECTING ANY CONNECTION TO THE EXTERNAL ELECTRIC UTILITY SUPPLY.
This means that the electrical service to your residence must be reconfigured with a 'changeover switch' or equivalent interlocked arrangement (presumably between the utility meter and your existing main circuit breaker) so that is is impossible for the generator and the external supply to be connected together at the same time.
Just to expand on that requirement a little; the danger is to workers on the power supply lines who might receive voltage/s back from your generator while working, to repair a fault or upgrade equipment.
If, God forbid, a death or injury occurred, due to some unauthorized hook-up, the householder could be liable?
Others with greater skill and knowledge on this news group will no doubt comment about the technical details.
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PS. In other words you can't just depend on throwing the main circuit breaker 'off' then having hooked it 'start up the generator'.
It would work but not safe.
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What you need ( and I think is required) is an automatic transfer switch. When the loss of utility power is detected, the switch will automatically disconnect the utility power and switch over to the generator. The switch usually requires a control module for detecting the change in voltage. Companies such as ASCO build switche modules. They ain't cheap and with good reason. It has to be fool proof for many of the reasons stated.
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bejay wrote:

Transfer switch, yes; _automatic_ no.
Manual is perfectly adequate and rarely needed for anything other than convenience, certainly, for residential application(s).
--
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He needs a transfer switch -- but not necessarily an automatic one. A manual transfer switch will work just fine.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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bejay wrote:

Were do you guys get the idea that the transfer interlock has to be automatic and external to the circuit breaker panel. There are transfer interlocks available from at least two manufacturers that are manually operated and are installed inside the panel's enclosing cabinet. The include a manual means that prevents the simultaneous closing of both the main and the generator circuit breakers.
--
Tom Horne

"This alternating current stuff is just a fad. It is much too dangerous
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On Jun 9, 1:34 pm, "Member, Takoma Park Volunteer Fire Department"

Can't recall anyone saying it had to be 'automatic'! Just that there should be an interlock. Some who posted feel that the interlock would be some sort of device 'between' the meter of the incoming utility electric supply and the fuse panel. There may be other ways of doing it within the circuit panel, as mentioned by Tom Horne. Some 40+ years ago I had a Pushmatic Panel that would have been ideal. It had two breakers in the input section . If those two could have been interlocked mechanically in some manner so that manually they could not both be 'on line' at same time it would have been safe. The OP keeps asking 'What is needed'? Considering the manner of asking hope that someone competent is hired to do the actual work!
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