Echo leaf blower carb tool

I bought an Echo PB-250 leaf blower about 2 years ago. It has never worked well. I brought it back to the dealer and he gave me some bull about the gas being old. The dealer is now gone out of business. Here's the problem. I can start it, but when I try to increase the engine speed, it will die. Now, I know this particular model has been a lemon according to stuff I've read. Newer models have a totally different carb. Some have said that Echo refuses to honor the warranty, etc. I need to adjust the carb. They use a special tool because of EPA stuff, etc. so you can't just go to a dealer and get one. The hole in the casting is about .105. There is a flatted D shaft inside the hole in which the tool must go over that shaft. I've looked on the internet for adjustment tools and all I can find is a pretty expensive one from the UK with a lot of shipping charges. Anyone know where I can get one at a reasonable cost or even any ideas of how to make one?
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First, I'd try a new fuel filter, and some carb cleaner in the fuel.
Second, I've never seen one of these. Can you drill the access hole a bit larger. And then push the adjuster with a flat blade jewler's screw driver?
Else, put it on a bonfire, and kill the flattened shaft. My humor is a non starter, it really blows.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
On 9/7/2013 8:21 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

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On 09/07/2013 08:21 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

If you want one that works: www.stihlusa.com If you're too cheap to buy a Stihl, buy a rake. At least the rake will work.
> I brought it back to the dealer and he gave me some bull about the gas being old.
If you were using ethanol gas, he was right. In as little as 30 days, ethanol gas can turn to shit. If you can't find ethanol-free gas, use a fuel like Stihl MotoMix.
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wrote:

That sounds like a Walbro carb that they use on a lot of small engines. There are dozens of models with different jetting but they are all basically the same. You can use a Dremel tool to cut a screwdriver slot in the adjusters but you usually have to take the machine apart to get to the carb.
Just cranking on those screws may make it worse.
I have a chain saw that was getting cranky and the local small engine guy gave it a tune up that got it working again.
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On 09/07/2013 05:21 AM, Art Todesco wrote:

If they are the "D" type, you can take some brass tubing and flatten one side to make a tool.
There used to be a plethora of carb tools on ebay, but it seems they have all gone away (still some on Amazon though).
Jon
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Futher to a previous post:
If the hole in the carb is about 1/10 of an inch, can you not buy a piece of 1/10 inch diamter brass tubing (at any hobby shop for use as steam pipe for miniature steam engines or fuel line for miniature IC engines) and file or grind half of it off so that it will fit inside that "D" shaped hole?
--
nestork


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