Drywall taping help

I'm doing my first drywall taping, and I need some advice. I did a "test strip" on one seam, using the perforated tape which the instructions say to put down on the dry seam, then cover with a coat of mud, pushing the mud through the perforations.
Now I have a couple of spots with bubbles in the tape, and there is a "bubble" down the one entire edge of the tape. In other words, this isn't going so well.
Two questions:
1. How do I fix what I've done so far?
2. How do I avoid this the next time?
Thanks!
--
x-no-archive: yes

Dave




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I'm no expert, but what taping I've done, I always put a layer of mud on the seam first, then tape, followed by more mud. As to the air bubble problem, if it were me, I'd re-do the seam. If you don't, at some point in the future the tape will separate from the drywall and look like hell.
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Patch wrote:

Mostly what Patch said. As for the bubbles, just slit them with a drwyall knife and apply your second coat of mud.
There are tons of websites with pics that show the process.
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to
If you are using the fiberglass tape that has a glued side, save it for cement board jobs. tear off what you already put on.
Get a roll of the plain paper tape.
(here's where the flames start)
Rip off a piece long enough for the joint. And soak it in some water while you mud the drywall joint.
Take the tape and run it between your fingers to get off most of the water.
lay it on the wet mud.
coat it with another thin mud layer.
Then use a wide blade to push it down and squeeze out most of the mud from behind.
Then go over with another coat of mud to roughly level the joint.
There is an old argument about "wetting" the tape, but it's always worked for me.
AMUN
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Amun wrote:

You're an insufferable ass...
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worked
.......And you're plonked again.
AMUN
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On Wed, 21 Sep 2005 12:52:13 GMT, "Airkings"

Did I read this right?
Mud first & add tape. Allow to dry before recoating.

Wash it off with lots of water down to the bare rock.

Thin your mud until it is like very thick soup for taping. Dont press too hard when you knife it or you can pull to much of it out.
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Airkings wrote:

I've had better luck with the plain old paper tape. The perforated stuff is usually thicker. OK for where the factory edges meet because it's buried in the bevel, but when you get a cut edge or a corner, it's harder to feather it out.
Fixing it??? Rip it out (GENTLY) and start over. It's good that you have a practice joint.
Brad
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People seem to have the fiberglass tape... It works VERY WELL for me.
Just take up the entire room and start going to town on covering it up. two coats and a skim coat and you're done.
I tried paper tape, it worked ok. I guess if you use it day in day out you get used to it, The fiberglass take was just a no brainer for the FYI guy. Looks good to this day.
Tom
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Airkings wrote:

When first learning, I used a 4" paint roller to set the tape into the mud & push out the bubbles, followed by a 6" putty knife to remove the excess mud. It worked pretty well for me.
Bob S.
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