Drying dishes in a dishwasher

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By the end of the rinse cycle, the vast majority of the hot water has been flushed down the waste line. The remaining heat is stored mainly in the dishwasher lining and the dishes. That really isn't very much heat in the grand scheme of things. And whether the door is open or closed, most of that heat will disperse into the kitchen as you say. However, the impact on the HVAC isn't going to be terribly significant; there simply isn't very much energy involved.
Heat recovery from the waste water might become an interesting proposition at some point in the future.
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| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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It doesn't get trapped.
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On Thu, 25 Jan 2007 18:48:07 -0800, Bill snipped-for-privacy@no.address wrote:

Ignore my posts if your dish washer doesn't have an air dry option. :)
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Yes, but in the winter you would be adding heat and moisture to the living space ;-)
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Garbage. It vents into the room anyway. The only difference is between a little bit at a time, and all at once.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Where do you think the heat from the dishwasher goes in summer with the door closed? With it closed or open, it doesn't matter. One way it gets into the house quickly, the other slowly.
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Terry wrote in message

I open the door to let the steam out, then close it.
Cheri
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With my Whirlpool 980, I've never used the dry cycle in 20 years. I always just leave the door closed, but then again I don't unload the dishwasher for quite awhile.
Now you've got me curious, why don't you run a couple of tests and then report back?
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heat...:)
There is an easy test. Put in a dish that holds a bit of water on top of it. You should find that the water will dry off better if you leave the door closed because the dishes remain hot longer. If you open the door the water on the dish will remain much longer. Try this. Wash dishes in the evening. One evening open the door and check the dishes in the morning. Do the same with the dishes but leave the door closed. The dishes should be dryer in the morning if the door remains closed.
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wrote:

Not exactly. At the end of the wash/rinse cycles the air inside the dishwasher is pretty much saturated with water (and cooling unless there's a heated dry cycle). Evaporation into water-saturated (and cooling) air just doesn't work very well. You gotta get some of the moisture out of there.
There may be some merit to opening the door (while the dishes are still hot) allowing a lot of moisture to escape and then quickly reclosing the door to retain as much heat as possible.
In other words, trapped heat will help the evaporation and trapped moisture will hinder it. At the end of the day, you've got to get the water out of the dishwasher if you want dry dishes. I still maintain that an open door approach will aid that process.
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X-No-Archive: yes
I recall reading the book that came with my first dishwasher (I think it was a KitchenAid) and they actually mentioned what they called Flash Dry as a means of saving energy. They said to open the door and pull out the dishracks to quickly dry the load. I find when I do that, the steam from the machine rises out of the machine and the dishes dry quickly.
It occured to me that if the water that you are using in the dishwasher doesn't get very hot doing this may not work very well.
Experimentation is called for as mentioned by some other responderes.
Good Luck!

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Exactly, the KA book has that info and it works. When the blower motor on my old DW died, I never replaced it. If you were nearby when the cycle finished, opening the door was a great way to dry the dishes very well.
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wrote:

How about that. This is what I do when I"m in a hurry. If one waits until the dishes cool off, this doesn't work very well.
Of course I also dump water out of depressions, like the bottom of rootbeer mugs, when I do this. I just dump into the door which has levees around the sides, and when I later close the door, it pours back into the dishwasher.
Sometimes, hot or cold, I pull out the top rack 3 or 4 inches to hold the door open that far, but then the door isn't blocking my way.

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Terry-
I've been doing this "no electric heat" dishwasher dry for YEARS.
Here's what I have found works best.
First, always select "no heat" dry so if you forget to intervene, you still will use less energy.
Cancel / end the dishwasher cycle when the dry cycle starts, open the door to let the "steam" escape, close door again & let dishes sit for awhile until the unit cools down, open the dishwasher & let the dishes finish by air drying.
Now this is fair amount of fiddling to save some energy so I shortcut the method to .....wash dishes right before going to bed, cancel / end cycle when dry cycle starts, open dishwasher & let sit over night.....dishes dry in the am.
Having conditioned air changes the equation somewhat;
in the summer if you use AC , the heat & mositures from the dishwasher dry cycle will have to be removed by the AC. If you let the dishes air dry, the AC will still have to remove the extra moisture generated by the dishes drying. I don't need / have AC so I have really done the calcs to determine the best option but my guess it that the AC will do less work if oyu let the dishes air dry.
OR you could figure out a way to dump the moist air outside (like a dry vent)
In heating season, adding some moisture to the house is probably a good thing as long as you don't generate moisture problems (condensation) but a dishwasher load probably doesn't have all that much water (as compared to a dryer load of clothes). BTW the heater will supply the energy to dry the dishes. :)
cheers Bob
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The heat and moisture are in the kitchen. It has to escape and evaporate, there is no where to go but the kitchen, either quickly as you open the door or slowly if you keep it closed.
wrote:

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wrote:

Whether you use a dry cycle or not the moisture goes in the house. It may disappear into thin air but it comes out someplace be it out the door, under the dishwasher, under the counter, etc. The rate at which it comes out would be what varies.
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Whether you use a dry cycle or not the moisture goes in the house. It may disappear into thin air but it comes out someplace be it out the door, under the dishwasher, under the counter, etc. The rate at which it comes out would be what varies.
And your point?
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wrote:

===>
Best point I could do with text...
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Leave the door open. Being warm does not help if there is no place for the moisture to go.
In the winter go ahead and use the dry cycle. There will be very little cost since the heat used will go towards warming your home. On the other hand during the summer with the A/C on you take a double hit since you pay for the heat and then you pay to pump it outside.
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Joseph Meehan

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