Dryer vents and gas meters...

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I have both a gas meter and my dryer vent abut 3 feet from each other, whihc seems to be acceptable minimum code however:
they are both under the deck.
The meter's regulator is just on the outside of the deck wall but the meter itself is on the inside. My deck is elevated about 4 feet up but it is walled with pressure treated slats, not tightly, but walled.
So instead of calling the gas company anyone have thots to if this is safe or not?
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On 3/11/2012 12:56 PM, Duesenberg wrote:

If you had a gas leak in your house, could you get to the meter quickly to shut it off?
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If I had a bad gas leak, I'd leave the house and call 911 from a safe distance.
--
Best regards
Han
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+1 [but have to ask. . . are there *good* gas leaks?]
Jim
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wrote:

Ok, English is my second language - I was going for the idiomatic "bad leak" meaning much more than just a little bit of leaking.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 3/12/2012 9:01 AM, Han wrote:

Han my friend, if you didn't grow up speaking English, you sure do a lot better with it than many of those who have. ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Thank you! I do appreciate that compliment. I must admit that I have experience speaking English since 1967 when I was assigned (I requested it) to an American to do research on blood platelets for my Biochemistry masters degree. Since coming to the US in 1969, I have helped write and have written many grant applications, most of which were (eventually) funded. For that to have happened my English would have to have been acceptable to the reviewers, not just the science behind the words.
--
Best regards
Han
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On 3/12/2012 9:45 AM, Han wrote:

I helped my mother get her masters in psychology by doing her computer statistics homework for her back in the late 60's. She would hand me a big stack of punch cards and I would take them to the computer center where the college had a shiny new IBM 360/50 RAX system. Oh yea, the computers I played with in my youth took up whole floors of buildings. Kids these days have no idea how easy they have it when it comes to data processing and retrieval. I wonder how many have spent the day in a library reading a stack of books just for fun? ^_^
TDD
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wrote:

Punch cards? You had punch cards?
How about hundreds of feet of paper tape like seen here?
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Honolulu_IFSS_Teletype1964.jpg
I like to remind the kids that I was IM'ing long before they were even born. We used Telex machines to communicate between stations...essentially on-line typewriters. There were even standard abbreviations to make the messaging faster.
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wrote:

Have you ever carted a few boxes of cards around? Ever dropped a box? Paper tape wasn't much of a step down.

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On 3/12/2012 12:08 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/d/db/Honolulu_IFSS_Teletype1964.jpg
The computer the university was replacing was a UNIVAC. It was a classic science fiction computer with lots of glass and lots blinking lights. There might have been paper tape used with that one and I think there was a thing called a drum memory the size of a 50gal drum that was like a hard drive. It had a capacity of 16 to 32kb as I recall. I don't know if it was a FASTRAND drum unit which are huge because I never got to see a lot of the old UNIVAC. Of course there were a number of tape drives but it was a long time ago. ^_^
TDD
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Book? Dude, what's a book?
Han's English is far better than my Dutch, German, or what he also speaks.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
I helped my mother get her masters in psychology by doing her computer statistics homework for her back in the late 60's. She would hand me a big stack of punch cards and I would take them to the computer center where the college had a shiny new IBM 360/50 RAX system. Oh yea, the computers I played with in my youth took up whole floors of buildings. Kids these days have no idea how easy they have it when it comes to data processing and retrieval. I wonder how many have spent the day in a library reading a stack of books just for fun? ^_^
TDD
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Sorry to disappoint you, but my Dutch is (according to my Dutch family and friends) very oldfashioned. My German and French should be primitive, but don't even approach that. My Italian is point and nod.
--
Best regards
Han
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On Mon, 12 Mar 2012 09:05:17 -0500, The Daring Dufas

Yeah, I'll do a +1 on that, too. I was going for the humor, Han-- Your usage was perfect, it is just one of those English 'funny' things.
Jim
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wrote:

I did see that, Jim, but I thought I could use some self-promotion <grin>. Also, usenet is international, as you know.
--
Best regards
Han
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Han wrote:

Huh?
In my town, the fire department's standard is to have the first piece of equipment* on scene within four minutes after the call. The police average nine minutes for an emergency call. Both of these standards are pretty good compared to the national average for a large city.
That said, how long will it take for the gas company to respond to a reported gas leak? Oh, I'm sure they'll get right on it, but it ain't gonna be within ten minutes! Whatever time it takes, the house will begin to fill with gas...
--
* Then there's the rest of the equipment. A couple of years ago, my power
went out. After waiting a few minutes, I stepped outside just to look
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The one time I had a gas leak (the pipe to the stove broke in half, going through the floor), the gas company was there within five minutes. When a leak report goes out, everyone in that area of the city drops what they're doing and responds. They don't even finish their donut. ;-)

Slow week?

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On 3/11/2012 5:34 PM, Han wrote:

My first call would be to the gas company. They tend to take leaks seriously.
Maybe 5 years ago I would get an occasional wiff of mercaptan (the odorant in gas) when outside the house. I always assumed it came from the boiler when it fires.
One day the air was really still and I followed it over to the area by the meter. I called the gas company and told them what I smelled and that it was outside. Within a few minutes a gas company truck pulled up followed by another one. The underground lateral was a steel pipe and it developed a tiny leak where it came out of the ground. The guy shut off the gas at the curb. I asked about their quick response and they said the dispatcher broadcasts when a gas leak is reported and they are supposed to stop what they are going and go there.
They called it in and within a few hours a construction crew arrived and dug up the street side. They cut off the old pipe at each end and ran plastic inside it.
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Ok. Here is my reasoning for calling 911. We have a professional police dept in Fair Lawn, but a volunteer fire department and ambulance service. Therefore when you call 911, the police is there usually before the fire dept or ambulance service (which are excellent as well). PSE&G is the electric/gas utility. I live on a street of homes on plots like 40x90 feet. In case of a serious gas leak, it would be of utmost importance to evacuate before things blow. Never heard of anything like that really close by, but in the greater NY City area those things do happen, both with gas company notification and without. Luckily my nose for the gas odorant is very sensitive. In fact whenever we are visiting my son in Somerville Mass, we walk by a place across from 725 Somerville Ave, next to the train tracks where it ALWAYS faintly smells of gas, but the Somerville gas company doesn't believe there is a leak.
--
Best regards
Han
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om:
...
...
What if they are working on or going to another gas leak? Are they supposed to stop working on that one and go to the latest one that was called in? ;-)
...

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