Dripping water


I have a wood frame ranch in North Carolina, about 40 years old. Lately I've been hearing water dripping where there should be no water.
For several minutes after I shower, I hear what distinctly sounds like water dripping in the ceiling over the vanity (not over the shower). I haven't been able to investigate because the attic is so crammed full of junk I couldn't begin to get to the affected area.
The arguments against it being a drip:
- There shouldn't be any pipes in the attic.
- If it was going to drip after using the shower it seems like it would drip all the time. As it is, it only lasts a couple of minutes
- There is no evidence of water damage. The ceiling drywall shows no sign of a leak.
The arguments for it being a leak:
- It just *sounds* like a leak.
Any suggestions?
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Richard Evans wrote:

Do you have an exhaust fan you use during/after shower? Is it cold where you live?
If yes to both, the dripping is condensation leaking out of the exhaust fan ducting.
Jim
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It's cold today (in the forties) but North Carolina seldom gets very cold and I can't say the drip correlates to cold spells, though I'll keep an eye on it. Also, the sound isn't where the duct would be.
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wrote:

Maybe the hot water supply pipe is tight against a stud or joist and creaking as it cools down...
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Richard Evans wrote:

Cold weather? Bathroom exhaust? Mebbe the bath exhaust going through attic forms condensation during showers and it drips afterward? Perhaps even inside the duct if the attic is cold and the moist bathroom air hits the cold.
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OK, I got into the attic and cleared a path to the affected area, but there is no flooring in that part of the attic and the space between the joists is filled with loose insulation. I can't see any pipes or, for that matter, the duct from the exhaust fan. The loose insulation also argues against a drip. If whatever is dripping is surrounded by insulation, the water would seep into the insulation and not drip.
I'm way to heavy to try dancing around on the exposed joists. Guess I'll have to call someone.
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wrote:

Not yet. Is any of that insulation wet? Did you bend down and feel it? Did you swish it out of the way looking for a pipe or wetness, then swish it back into place? Go up there next time you hear the sound and look for something then.
I agree with Rick - unless you find wetness, chances are the temperature change is causing a structural member to make noises until it cools, or a pipe is rubbing against a structural member under thermal expansion, then stops when it cools.
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Like I said, I'm way too heavy to be tip toeing around on open joists, and that's what I'd have to do to get near the sound. I don't even trust the pull-down ladder I have to climb to get up there. Way better to call someone.

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