Double pocket door kit for single width opening?

I've got a closet door opening in my office that I would like to install a pocket door in. I can't relocate the opening because of our wood floors, and there isn't enough space to either side for a single door to slide before it runs out of space. Is there a kit that would allow me to use 2 half width doors which would slide to either side? I've perused a few of the kit sites (interiordoors.com and Johnson's site), but I'm not coming up with much. Am I going to need to engineer my own solution for this, or is my best bet to just buy 2 single kits and cut them down to size?
Thanks!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
nhurst wrote:

what about bi-fold doors? You could probably get two small doors (lumber yard, not Borg) and cut down a bypass track to fit. The bypass doors are going to be a PITA on a standard size opening though. If you can't use bi-fold doors your best bet is probably a cheesey accordian door. http://www.accordion-doors.com /
Installing a pocket door is not a simple DIY project. It is not extremely difficult, but you need to know: is the wall load bearing? are the studs at least 2x4? how to repair drywall or plaster how to relocate plumbing/heat/electrical if needed
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RayV wrote:

I have a general dislike for these types of doors. I've never had a good experience with them, and after a while, they end up getting wobbly and frustratingly finicky to operate.

sure. It's got 2 2x4's that are nailed together running along the top of the wall, and there used to be a half-height closet going up to the ceiling further down the same wall. Also, the only studs I would need to take out are the ones immediately to the left and right of the door frame itself, if I do the double door thing. All the studs are 2x4 (and they're all 50 year old fat lighter pine, too... the place smells like Pine-Sol whenever I have to drill into a stud). I can hang sheetrock, no problem. It's pretty easy to do. There is only one electrical outlet on the wall, and it's far enough away that I can put another stud between it and the door to prevent it from getting knocked around.
Also, I'm not looking for bypass doors, but 2 half width doors on the same track that will meet edge-to-edge in the middle of the opening. That's why I'm not sure if I can get away with a single extra long track or need to buy 2 single opening kits and cut the rails down.
Thanks for the reply!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I think with a little fussing around you could make do with a standard kit except for one thing: you need twice as many door rollers for the track since you will have two doors. The standard kits come with 2 sets of rollers and you will need 4. The other stuff you should be able to manage by mounting half on each side of the opening. When you think about it, you don't need anymore travel or any more "pocket" than you would with a single door, you just want half of it on each side. At most you may need an extra inch or so of track, but most of them need to be cut down a bit anyway. You may have to improvise a bit, but I think you will be able to make it work. Maybe you can buy an extra set of rollers from the manufacturer; I imagine they are needed as spare parts from time to time. IAEF, buy two kits; they aren't that expensive. And buying two kits lets you double up on the steel reinforced studlets, which helps avoid that flimsy, hollow wall feeling.
Even a standard pocket door latchset should work if you mortise the strike into one door and mount the latch on the other.
I always use a solid core door for pocket doors; it avoids that cheap, floppy feeling, slides more smoothly, blocks noise better, and just has a higher quality feel to it.
HTH,
Paul Franklin
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.