Don't upset the inspector

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I don't know of anyone that ever ran into those situations. Have you?
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nope, me neither. Never been asked about wiring by an insurance company, never brought up remodel particulars whilst buying a house (and we've bought 5 in the last 2 years), never any of this anal shit people spout off about.
s
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wrote in message

I have. But I am not answering for Mike.
Steve
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#1. been there done that with the insurance guy. No problem.
#2. not selling the house
#3. Any such questions arise like that with me and I'd just say "Like that when we got here". Done.
s

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Reality is nature's way of keeping things straight.
Steve
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Edwin Pawlowski writes:

It would be dumb to not distinguish a BUILDING PERMIT from a PLUMBER'S LICENSE. The permit was for a larger project. The plumbing inspector refused to sign off on the larger permit, at least until his boss agreed to override him under threat of lawsuit.
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There are a couple things they _will_ do if he ignores the notice and continues building, none of them very pleasant; the worst involves fines and jail-time. They [the country inspectors' office] could also make him tear it down. This happened to a neighbor of mine that built an enclosed patio "extension" when he went to sell his home. All that effort and money because he also had a "Permits!-we-don't-need-no-stinking-permits!" attitude.
The cost of a permit is nothing compared to the aggravation (and increasing frustrations) he's going to be feeling if he continues to ignore the order.
As others have said, he should visit the county offices with a humble attitude. A quick purchase of the permit, set up an appointment to have it inspected, a minor walk-through to let the inspector point out a few "areas of improvements," and your friend will get to keep his new structure.
The Ranger
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clipped

We had seawall work done because the yard was washing into the channel - thirteen tiebacks with concrete anchors. The concrete that is used under water. Permit, drawings, whole nine yards. Inspection when the holes were dug and rods in place. Red tag because there happened to be water in the hole when the inspector arrived (usually two high tides per day, of course). My hubby was bldg. mgr. for the condo, so we did just about everything together and I was uaually able to keep him out of trouble. The contractor called the inspector back when there was no water in the hole, laid off his crew for a full day as a result, got approval and continued. I chatted with the inspector and found out he was the same who passed our lousy reroof. The contractor was a nice guy, good to work with and did good work. I found out later there was also a $50 fee for the "red tag". While I know some inspectors are scum, I have great respect for the authority of the city to require min. standards. Last year the idiot (unlicensed) upstairs burned up some of our wiring while remodeling without a permit. City didn't do squat. Yet. Wonder if the prosecutor would?
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There's nothing you can really say to someone who knows it all. They will either learn or not learn by their own experience. If he's a friend of yours, don't say anything, and just watch.
Steve
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Yes that attitude always works well when dealing with city hall. NOT!!!! They could revoke his certificate of occupancy making it impossible to sell and possibly jeopardizing his current mortgage. After all if a bank is holding the mortgage he is not really the true owner. If that property suddenly becomes worthless he may not have a pot to....
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If they pull the CO, he can't legally live there - he could be evicted from his own house.
Dan, maybe you should tell him that he should keep ignoring city hall for your entertainment. Who knows - maybe he'll be the one to piss into the wind without getting wet. ;)
R
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Have you talked to them and figured out what a permit entails. Hopefully they will just double the permit fees (or whatever the regular spanking they do) and inspect what you have but some places (Florida in particular) will want engineered plans with raised seal and are generally a pain in the ass if you try to draw them yourself (I am in that quagmire as we speak) I have just about decided to abandon the project and live with what I have after about $500 in bureacratic bullshit without moving a shovel of dirt. They still want "one more piece of paper" as they did in my last 5 trips downtown. Worst case is they will fail your foundation or something and you will be tearing it down or doing serious remedial repairs to make them happy. Again you may need an engineer.
That will all depend on your building department and what you built. No matter what, you are in it now, so that "humble" approach is next ... take your checkbook.
BTW the way they deal with this in the 2 states I have lived is as a civil court matter. Basically they sue you for not having the permit, a slam dunk case and the "fine" is actually a judgement against the property. They just slap a lien on you and forclose if you don't pay up. These "suits" can actually be daily fines so it can get expensive in a hurry. You will really have to stick your thumb in their eye to get in criminal court (jail)
I am a Florida licensed inspector so I am required to take the law courses every 2 years.
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wrote:

You're not a good inspector if you can't find SOMETHING wrong.
From day one at Inspector School.
It's a smart idea to just go along with the program.
Steve
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

(snip)
Rueful chuckle. About 15 years ago, my father (a residential designer of 40-some years experience at the time) tried to set up shop in Hartford, CT, to be near his new-at-time grandkids up the road in central MA. He found the permitting and approval process in both CT and MA to be so onerous, that he could not get enough work to get by, and had to move back to Louisiana (where he had had a thriving practice) within a couple of years. It is pretty much a guild situation around there- they wanted AIA and/or certified engineer stamps for the most trivial of remodeling projects. Getting something stamped basically required the customer to pay for the work twice- once for him to do the design (which the customers always liked- he is good at what he does)- and then again for someone with a stamp to look over and approve his plans. Guess what priority reviewing 'outside' designs has in most design/engineering shops? The time delays and added costs just made the whole thing unworkable as a business model, which was pretty clearly what the locals wanted. Do it all Their Way, or don't do it.
He went back down to Louisiana, which is thankfully less civilized, and now, at the age of 81 (and half blind) still has more work than he can handle designing mansions for rich doctors.
-- aem sends...
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Your "renegade" needs to grow up. Otherwise this story will not have a happy ending.
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There are those in my area who do not listen to advice nor do they follow any rules or law. Darwin tends to get these types. I read about them in the newspaper! (Fatal car accident, house burns down and no insurance, arrested, etc...)
"DanG" wrote in message

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Bill wrote:

But sometimes the train leaves the track, and Darwin gets the poor sucker they sold the home to. Or the children of.
It is still amazing how many people manage to snuff themselves with portable heaters or generators.
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DanG wrote:

One approach I've heard used with mixed results is to meet the inspector with a steely eye and a pistol strapped to your hip.
A cheroot helps.
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In the towns where I have lived, permits serve two purposes: First, they, if done right, insure that safety and building code provisions are met; Second, they alert the city to possible improvements in the property, which can result in an increase in property tax.
So if the tax rolls show the property I'm looking at has three bedrooms and no air conditioning, but my visit shows five bedrooms and central air, that is an indication of unpermitted work, which will, at least, increase the property tax when discovered. But more dire is that if I do such work, or buy property on which it has been done, and there is a problem with the wiring, for example, that leads to a fire, my insurance company is going to check to see if the work was permitted, and deny coverage if it was not.
Around here, if a homeowner has been cited for doing unpermitted work, the government can demand that he remove it, or at least dismantle it enough that they can do an inspection. I imagine that if the owner stands by running his mouth, the inspection can be very thorough. If he refuses, they pull the occupancy permit, and you have a house no one, including yourself, can legally occupy. From there, you will probably get to deal with a called mortgage, and possible jail time. And trying to sell property with an unoccupiable house on it should be interesting; he'll probably have to pay the buyer to take it off his hands.
DanG wrote:

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