Does anyone make a STURDY Tire Wrench

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I ditched the 4-way lug wrench a long time ago and picked up a long 1/2" breaker bar with the exact 6-point socket to fit. Depending on how deep your lugs sit back in the wheel, you might need a short extension too. Since lugs are under a lot of torque, I bought a good quality Craftsman bar and socket. Yes, they're expensive, but a $30-40 investment is minimal for a vehicle. You don't want cheap tools that break when you're stuck on the side of a lonely road somewhere.
One bonus of a breaker bar and socket is they are light weight and are easy to store in your vehicle.
I have never needed a pipe on my breaker bar. Most times it is easy to loosen the lugs by hand. However, on some occasions the tire shops really over torque the lugs and the lugs are stuck after a couple years. I just angle the bar parallel to the ground and stand on the end of the bar as needed. There has never been a lug I couldn't get loose with this technique. Of course, no harm done if you have room to carry the pipe too.
Take care,
Anthony Watson www.mountainsoftware.com www.watsondiy.com
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 16:54:37 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

nut with the breaker bar pointed at the ground in the direction of motion required to undo the nut, bar end on the ground, and put the car in gear. Guaranteed to do one of 3 things - remove the nut, break the stud, or break the wrench.
I've done all 3 at one point or another. Have not managed to jack the car up over the breaker bar yet but I guess that would be a 4th possibility.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I tried that with my '51 Chevy, iirc, to break the bead on the tire. The car jacked up just fine. My memory is a little cloudy on the point but I think the owner's manuals back in the day illustrated the technique.
Anyway, I let the car down and went on to some other scheme to break the bead.
My current scheme with lug nuts is, if a tire shop mounts the tires, to drive directly home, take the nuts off with an impact wrench if necessary, and install them with a breaker bar. I have been known to use a torque wrench but my fingers are well calibrated by now.
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wrote:

The tire shop I go to has a big window where you can sit and watch them change and rotate the tires. They seem to use the torque tubes on the impact wrenches, but give them a final check with the manual torque wrench.
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On Saturday, December 27, 2014 4:22:15 PM UTC-5, Ralph Mowery wrote:

The problem is that guarantees they are AT LEAST torqued to that amount. It does not check that they are not overtorqued.
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wrote:

they know how to use their impact - KNOWING they need to do the final torque by hand.
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On 12/27/2014 6:37 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Skilled techs aren't the problem, here.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 18:57:24 -0500, Stormin Mormon

you deserve all the hurtin' they lay on you.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

+1 and Stumped ain't one of them...
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Tekkie

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Tekkie® wrote:

++1, ultimately you are in charge of every thing. When I was working I always drove company car. After retiring, I only have had Subarus, Acuras. No thank you for domestic brand cars.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 16:54:37 +0000 (UTC), HerHusband

I'm not sure how to explain it, but somehow the flex of the 4way wrench is the cause of the NOT loosening the lugnuts. It appears that too much of the energy applied to the wrench goes into bending (flexing) of the metal in the wrench, and is not used on the nut itself.
As the OP in this thread, and after reading all the replies, I have just left my half inch breaker bar and socket (7/8") in my pickup truck. It's a mid 90's truck and does not have metric nuts. I'll buy another breaker bar when I find one on sale at Sears or another quality type. Because I want one in my garage tools, so I dont have to have to get it out of the truck everytime I work on stuff. But that 4way wrench is being retired.
The truck was bought from a private party, and did not come with the original wrench or a jack. I keep a small floor jack inside the cab (which are usually better anyhow).
Yesterday I took the truck to a tire shop and had the bad tire replaced. I then had the tire guy put anti-sieze on the lugs on that tire, and had him put it on ALL my tire lugnuts. He has a power wrench and did all of them in a couple minutes, rather than trying myself and fighting with doing it by hand myself. He charged me $5 extra to lube all the nuts, which was well worth it. While he was doing it, I asked him about the 4way wrenches and he agreed that 4way wrenches are not the best. Then I asked him if the reason is because of the flex on them, and he said that it's part of the problem, plus they often dont fit tight enough. He said I'm doing the right thing by carrying a breaker bar and socket.
As far as you saying you have never needed a pipe on a breaker bar, I have to say that I have needed a pipe more than not. But I drive older vehicles, and I'm elderly myself. From now on, everytime I buy a new vehicle, I am going to have him anti-sieze all the nuts as soon as I buy the vehicle. I'm tired of having a tire go flat and not being able to remove the lugnuts on the side of the road. That has happened far too many times over the years. I still recall one time having to walk about 5 miles to buy a piece of pipe, then walking back to the car. It took half a day to finally change that damn tire. Tires are made better now, then they were in the past, but they all go flat sooner or later. I know one guy who dont carry a spare tire. He said he never gets flats. I told him that he's a fool!
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snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

I carry the usual donut in the car. I have another set of rims with mounted tires but a real tire won't fit in the spare well which pissed me off.
I also carry a plug kit and a small 12VDC pump. That's saved the day a couple of times. Summers, I'm usually on one of the bikes and you learn early if you can't fix a flat 20 miles from East Moosenuts you have a problem, so all the bikes have pumps and plug kits or tube patches. With the DR, I throw in a spare tube for good measure. Of course, that goes for the bikes with pedals too. With them, I carry a spare tube too.
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It is one of many "zam-fixes" I learned while in Central Africa (Zambia) teaching the automotive trade, which I later found werer also used by our resourcefull East Coast latecomers to confederation.
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wrote:

need to change a tire on the road I'll trust my "calibration" until I get home and recheck with the torque wrench. I'm usually pretty darn close - but I check anyway. Have not had a tire failure on the road that required a road-side change since about 1972? on my own vehicles. A few flat on the driveway, and a few getting low by the time I got home or to the garage - not counting removing the wheels on the 204 Peugeot several times on the trip from Livingstone to Mbereshi over the christmas/new-years holiday of 2003/2004 to straighten the rims after hitting some awfull potholes. Thankfully NOT tubeless tires!!!.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 13:11:30 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@spamblocked.com wrote:

both daughters, so spare or no spare or flat spare, I'm covered. I've used the auto club membership twice - bad transmission and bad universal joint - both while driving across Michigan in Ford Aerostars.
In the last 34 years I've not had a tire go flat on the road except for a bad valve stem in PEI, and even then I made it to a garage before it went right flat - thankfully - because the car was PACKED and getting to the spare would have been more work than changing it.
I've changed numerous wheels for others stuck on the side of the road.
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On Saturday, December 27, 2014 4:02:13 PM UTC-5, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

That's my experience too. We've even stopped carrying a can of Fix-a-flat, which I kept in the trunk because there was no way my wife was strong enough to get lug nuts off anyway.
I think having to pass inspection annually means we buy tires more often!
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On 12/27/2014 4:01 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Those little 12 volt compressors are ten bucks or so at Harbor Freight. I think, worth every penny. I have one in each vehicle.
One time a friend had a flat in the church parking lot. Another man and I got the spare out, which had no pressure. In spite of being a Ford Expedition with 17 inch rims, my little 12 volt compressor aired up the spare. Noisy little unit, and it did take several minutes.
True nerds will correct me, the spare did have 14.7 PSIA, but I really needed about 50 PSIA to keep the rim off the ground. Carry on, nothing to see here.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On 12/28/2014 7:59 AM, Stormin Mormon wrote:

14.7 PSIA prolly be about right for use on the moon.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 16:34:38 -0500, "Ralph Mowery"

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wrote:

tire go back on at seasonal tire change - When I take the tires off for changeover, if they are "iffy" they come off the rims immediately so there is no temptation to get "a few more miles" out of them next season. Tires are cheap compared to the alternative - an accident or getting standed somewhere less than safe.
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