Does anyone make a STURDY Tire Wrench

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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 16:32:56 -0500, Stormin Mormon

it was rust proof, being all plastic. The underbody and subframe, on the other hand, started out as steel and progressed through iron oxide to 80% nitrogen. I called it my "six seater corvette". Corvettes suffer the same fate. My '96 Ranger is virtually rust free at 323000km here in central ontario, where roads are heavily salted like in New York. It was rusproofed from new with "Rust-Chek" and retreated on a constant schedule since. Lots of vehicles stand up quite well here if properly maintained. Mazdas seem to rust faster than most
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On 12/26/2014 2:22 PM, Mayayana wrote:

My last Toyota p-up went 18 years

You were lucky. Many of those places caused more rust than they prevented. That's why they are gone, plus most cars do have good protection from the factory. The aftermarket may also void the factory warranty for rust through
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 13:51:58 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

This was a long time ago when alloy wheels were not that common. There were a lot of tire shops who would not even handle them.
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nestork wrote, on Fri, 26 Dec 2014 03:24:24 +0100:

I think the OP would need to be crazy to use Teflon tape. Even the anti-seize may be a bit too much, but I use it as the sacrificial metal in the galvanic reaction that inevitably occurs with the metal-on-metal connection.
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On Friday, December 26, 2014 5:59:01 PM UTC-5, Danny D. wrote:

What do you think would likely go wrong?
Either tape or antiseize, or any other type of grease, lubricates the connection. Most torque recommendations specify dry or lubed, so you have to be sure to use the lower number or you will over torque the fastener.
I've always lubed nuts and bolts and never had one properly torqued that worked itself loose, even on vibrating engines. If Teflon would make a joint come loose, wouldn't plumbing joints all loosen and leak eventually?
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On 12/26/2014 9:20 PM, TimR wrote:

Because they end up at a furnace or toilet that can't rotate like a lug.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Friday, December 26, 2014 9:35:30 PM UTC-5, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Stormy,
How many turns on a toilet (I guess you'd have to lift it up and tip it ove r, better wear boots) does it take to
*loosen a joint* enough to leak? If you've ever done any amount of plumbin g, you know you don't have to unscrew a fitting all the way to have it leak . You just have to loosen (or tighten) a tiny tiny bit past where it shoul d be
I don't put Teflon tape on a toilet, come to think of it.
There are lots of plumbing joints that are subject to high vibration, becau se there's a recirculating pump or other motor shaking them constantly. Do you avoid Teflon tape for those?
Shotgun choke tubes are commonly installed with teflon tape, because otherw ise they tend to stick and can't be changed out. These are high temperatur e AND high impact joints where shaking loose could be a VERY bad idea. Out board motors have a number of joints commonly installed with tape. None of these are tapered threads. So it does work, you just never heard of it be fore.
I don't like tightening any fastener dry, whether tapered or straight. Thi s is because I believe you can't get the torque accurately enough dry, you have too much friction to be sure of the right amount of torque. I've alwa ys lubed joints of any kind, but recently learned tape can be a lot less me ssy while still lubricating and allowing easy removal.
Of course torque itself is meaningless; the purpose is to make sure your bo lt is loaded to the correct amount of tension and never in shear. But we c an only measure torque.
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 14:56:19 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I was servicing and installin g tires on alloy rims back i 1969, and it was well known already back then by anyone legitimately calling themselves a "tire guy"
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 14:22:15 -0500, "Mayayana"

aluminum corrodes away where it contacts steel. Even the lowly landrover figured out how to mitigate that problem long ago.
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 19:16:45 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

70s and by tire guy I mean the high school drop out they hire at a tire store. There were plenty of stores that simply refused to deal with alloy rims. I guess you don't have lawyers up there.
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I have never seen anyone recommed using the Teflon tape for anything but pipe joints. Especially as a lube or antisieze for bolts.
The plumbing joints do not usually move, especially in a circular motion to unscrew them.
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On 12/26/2014 9:39 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:

There was the one time years ago, a furnace rotated six times, and the gas line came off....
Some questions are so comical.
- . Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:29:54 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

the money on equipment to handle the tricky stuff without harming it. We always had owners of alloy rims sign a release on them, but never damaged one. We also hired high school graduates as apprentices to operate the equipment.
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:54:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

See I told you ... different
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rust than they prevented - like Ziebart and Rusty Jones. The oil/wax/grease type rustproofing WORKS. Crown, Rust-Chek, and Waxoil are worth applying. The 2002 Taurus was WaxOiled when new, and Crowned 2 years ago and is totally rust free. My old 1988 New Yorker was Wax-oiled when new and was virtually rust free when we sold it at age 18. We oiled it twice later, if I remember correctly. The Mystique and the LeBaron were not rustproofed - and they rotted away. The TransSport frame/unibody rusted seriously. I had the rust damage repaired and oiled it well and got another several years out of it before the engine went. The truck had over 375,000km on it - with 100,000km on the second engine.
Those electric rust preventer units are a hoax. Friend's 06? Impala has had several thousand dollars of rust repairs done on it under warranty and their 07 Silverado is catching up quickly!!!. Mabee it's just the GMs - but I'll continue to have my vehicles treated with Crown or Rust-Chek, etc.
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wrote:

need to loosenthe one connected to it, and the one before that, and the one before that -----.
That said, I still cannot see using teflon tape on a straight thread - like a bolt. Anti-Sieze works. I've never had a properly torqued wheel nut come loose with anti-seize or without.I usually torque a lubed fastener to the lower end of spec. Over 45 years experience and NEVER seen teflon tape used or recommended for use on wheel nuts/studs or any other "fastener" by anyone who knows anything about automobiles or fasteners.
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:39:09 -0500, Stormin Mormon

with!
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 21:54:29 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Just Tires didn't require a "release" for alloy rims when my son worked there. Everybody knew about alloy rims. But his manager put a wheel with a carbon fibre rim on the Road Force balancer after my son dismounted it and rolled it over. Customer didn't tell him the rim was carbon fiber. It snapped at the hub when the rolling pin came down on it. Cost the shop about $2k to have a replacement shipped from Italy. So if you have carbon fiber rims, please mention it to the shop, so they can send you to the dealership. It'll save you time and the shop money.
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On Fri, 26 Dec 2014 23:09:20 -0600, Vic Smith

I had a set of Crager SS mags that I had trouble getting guys to mount tires on without a release.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2014 00:24:00 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

cast alloy center was just crimped into the chromed steel rim. There was no weld. They were easy to damage demounting the tire. The one and 2 piece "torque thrusts" were all alloy, and the 2 piece ones were welded - much superior to the Cragar. Fenton, American Racing, Eagle Alloy, Ansen? and a few other manufacturers made them in natural sandcast, polished, and chrome versions. The Keystone K-Mag was also a 2 piece hybrid wheel (I had a set on my 74 Dart Sport and if I didn't want the car to be recognized I just popped the stock wheel disks on (with electrical tape on the "tangs" to prevent scratching the chrome). It still had a slightly wider than stock stance but didn't draw attention.
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