Direct power vent


Can someone explain to me what direct power vent is? I understand that direct vent and is the vent that vents naturally, power vent has blower, what "direct power vent" is? I am going to buy and install A.O. smith vertex 100 direct power vent water heater both for DHW and radiant heat. I can't figure out how to proper vent it. The manual shows both direct vent code requirements and power vent code requirements but not for direct power vent.
I will probably vent the heater with separate inlet and exhaust pipes through the side of the wall. How far apart they need to be? How far do they need to be from furnace exhaust vent also through the side of the wall (rim joist)? Any clearance needed from basement bath exhaust fan vent in the same side wall?
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The install manual will answer all these questions. As to vent tube size, spacing, etc. Power vent means there is an electric blower that moves the flue gasses.
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On Apr 29, 10:32 am, "Stormin Mormon"

What the difference between power vent and direct power vent? The water heater install manual shows direct vent and power vent and but no direct power vent.
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wrote:

What the difference between power vent and direct power vent? The water heater install manual shows direct vent and power vent and but no direct power vent.
These may be terms specific to the manufacturer. "Power Vent" like ones built by Fields controls, is a suction fan mounted on the exterior of the building. It may be that what they're calling direct power vent, is a blower built onto the unit. These typically use special vent pipe with sections that lock together
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wrote:

Nothing?!
Look at how tankless water heaters are vented. Location, location, location...
Gas or electric heater?
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Actually, I don't know what the diff is between those. Most likely "direct power vent" is the same as "power vent".
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Take your installation manual down to City Hall and ask the building department folks what regulations apply. Many communities will not want a permit pulled for a simple replacement, but if they fuss about wanting to know who's going to do the work, simply tell them it hasn't been decided yet and you just want to make sure it's done right by whomever you choose. There are some really strong plumbing cartels in some areas, so you may get some flack. Good luck.
Joe
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Now that is funny!
Plumber's Crack?
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You don't want to be sniffing plumber's crack. It's addictive.
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How can you keep the heating system and your home supply seperated, you cant mix the two or continualy enter new water into your heating system or you will have a contaminated shower, and the oxygen in new water will kill any heating systems metal fast. Heating systems are closed systems, the Oxygen cooks out rapidly on a few long cycles, any metal will be affected to Oxidise fast. Did you know the Vertex is 82-84 EF, not so overall efficent its not a rating AO openly publishes or is easy to find, and I have the AO Cyclone. You better rethink your approach fast. You vent it through the wall with PVC, intake and exhaust, be sure you have the proper angles in horizontal and follow instructions on length and elbows, but I think you need a pros help since you cant figure the basics, How about that Manometer test.
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wrote:

Vertex is 82-84 % efficient? That does not make much sense. It is the only 100,000 BTU input water heater that I can put my hand into the exhaust and only feel a little warmth, the rest has been absorbed by the water. If I try that with my high efficiency furnace, I will burn my hand.
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Hardly scientific testing is it, and its no different on a Condensing heating unit, its cool also. Learn what the EF rating is, then get confused, but remember you are comparing a Tank to a heating Boiler. If you want a water heater with a 94 EF rating then its a Takagi TH1, I believe, it is the most efficent way to heat water that I know of. EF is not a rating tank manufacturers want you to know about in comparisons or usualy openly publish right in front where you can find it. www.energystar.gov lists all tanks by EF rating. Still, you dont mix heating and potable water, it wont pass any code anywhere, anytime. I dont know what you radiant system planned is, but besides the danger of always present Oxygen there is Scale buildup from constantly adding new water.
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