diesel fuel in a home fuel oil furnace?

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wrote:

Hi Edwin,
The major hospitals and universities in downtown Halifax burn Bunker C, as does the Tuft's Cove GS located on the Dartmouth side of the harbour. Our natural gas distributor is currently extending its pipeline into the downtown core to serve these loads, so thankfully, a little less of this crap will make its way up the stack. Unfortunately, the situation with Nova Scotia Power wouldn't likely change anytime soon, as the utility prefers to sell off its allotment of natural gas to New England and thereby pocket the difference in the cost of these two fuels (personally, I wouldn't mind paying a little more for cleaner air, but obviously opinions differ).
Cheers, Paul
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I had a summer job in an oil refinery, testing products in the lab. I don't think that refinery produced any bunker C, it all either went into asphalt (at the time, this refinery produced 85% of Ontario's road building asphalt, plus specialty asphalts/tars) or further processing for lube oil base stocks (at the time the most advanced lube production facility in North America).
--
Chris Lewis,

Age and Treachery will Triumph over Youth and Skill
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On Feb 11, 7:21 am, snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com (Chris Lewis) wrote:

Yep, You ain't a gonna see bunker C being delivered to homes. Any place that uses it (really big installations or ships) heats it before use.
Harry K
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George wrote:

...
It's a whole lot more complicated than that... :)
"...multifunctional diesel fuel additive packages are built around ... dispersant/detergent technology which meets the requirements for ...injector cleanliness. ... The detergent can be combined with other functional components such as lubricity improver, cold flow improver, deicer, cetane improver, corrosion inhibitor and/or demulsifier to deliver additional benefits..."
W/O the additional lubricity specifically, no modern diesel engine will last long and the injector-cleanliness requirements as well as S limits on road-fuels are significant factors. Underneath, yes, it's "fuel oil", but the engine-diesel is far more sophisticated a product.
--
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dpb wrote:

Agree.
I didn't want to get into it that deep but what you wrote is accurate. My buddy has a liquid fuels business and he often tells me of all of the hassles of keeping track of all of this and the multiple trips his trucks have to run for the separate products.
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George wrote:

The same applies to heating oil sold in the same climate since some folks have outdoor above ground oil tanks just as vulnerable to gelling as a vehicle.
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Pete C. wrote:

It is done much differently. They don't blend the oil and offer "heating oil" except at point of delivery if that is what you specify. They sell #1 or #2 for home use and if they have never delivered to you they will ask if you have an outside tank. If so they will flag your account as requiring #1.
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Or they put in an additive for the #2. Many places around here do not do #1
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on 2/2/2008 8:44 AM Dr. Hardcrab said the following:

Diesel fuel is going for $3.56 to $3.80 a gallon around here. Kerosene is about $3.90 a gallon Heating oil is $2.93 to 3.39 a gallon. Looks like heating oil is the cheapest, for me anyway.
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Bill
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I knew some folks years ago, who often ran out of fuel oil. They were upset that the water heater didn't work dependably, so they replaced it. Instead of having the oil tank filled. They were idiots, for sure. I poured a lot of five galon cans of diesel or kero into their tank for a while.
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Christopher A. Young
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heating oil IS #1 diesel.
s

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Not necessarily. Sometimes it's #2 diesel. Sometimes it's a mix of the two. And sometimes it's #2 with additives to keep it from getting thick a colder temps.
(One effect of the above is that if you buy heating oil in bulk it is *essential* to make sure the supplier is aware that fuel bought in the summer will be stored and used in the winter. Otherwise it is possible to get a great deal on "summer grade" stove oil, and have a tank full of jelly come cold weather.)
Moreover, Both #1 and #2 "diesel" are regionally defined, with each refinery deciding exactly what they will sell under those names.
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Floyd L. Davidson <http://www.apaflo.com/floyd_davidson
Ukpeagvik (Barrow, Alaska) snipped-for-privacy@apaflo.com
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S. Barker wrote:

No
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Not here in CT. It is #2
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#1, #2, the question was "can i use diesel in home heating". #1. or #2. it's still diesel. And i doubt your's is #2 in that climate.
s

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On Sun, 3 Feb 2008 10:40:25 -0600, "S. Barker"

Our local dealers (Halifax, N.S.) stopped offering #1 three or four years ago and this caused problems for folks with oil stoves/space heaters; in most cases, a simple carburetor adjustment did the trick, but in a few instances, homeowners were completely out of luck.
Interestingly, low sulphur heating oil may offer superior low-temperature performance; to whit:
".... Don Allen, Jr., President of E.T. Lawson, says his technicians are discovering clear evidence that the amount of scaling in low sulfur-burning furnaces is comparatively less than systems used with regular #2 oil. The corporation is so convinced of low sulfur oil advantages that it guarantees that the oil will not gel, wax, ice, or sludge; otherwise, the company promises to clean the entire heating system for free and refund the cost of the tune-up...."
Source: http://www.americanoilinvestments.com/articles/Oil-Gas-Investments_4658.html
Cheers, Paul
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Delivery slip says #2
When I was in Italy it was common to use diesel in home heating burners. Sells for the same high price as heating oil. In mild climates people can buy five or ten gallons at a time that way.
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"S. Barker" wrote:

All my meter slips for heating oil delivery in northwest CT list "#2 Fuel" in the product field.
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