Did Rain-x ruin my windshield or is it normal (how to make it better)?

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Slacker wrote:

You could try cleaning it with 0000 steel wool and aerosol window cleaner (I prefer Stoner's Invisible Glass) that is my regimen for hard to clean windows. If it is still spotty you might want to follow up with some kind of polish.
nate
--
replace "roosters" with "cox" to reply.
http://members.cox.net/njnagel
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To find what is inside Rain-X, I first tried calling Sopus Products in Houston at 800-416-1600 but they are only open 8am to 5pm Central time. Their web page says Rain-X is composed of methanol http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 03038
Looking deeper, I then tried calling Kafko International, Ltd. 800-528-0334 in Illinois http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 013001 Interestingly, they say Rain-X is isopropanol and sulfuric acid!
I look again at Shell Oil's Rain-X only to find it's made out of "unspecified surfactants" and water! http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 037001
Back at Pennzoil-Quaker State, we find Rain-X composed of clay, alcohol, and emulsifiers! Clays = 1-10% Ethanol/SD Alcohol 40 = 70-95% Isopropanol = 1-10% Thickening agent(s) = 1-5% http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 03042
Moving to Scottsdale Arizona, calling Unelko Corp at 800-528-3149, I find it's got a whole recipe of "anes", "ols", "acids", and "ones"... Ethanol/SD Alcohol 40 = 86% Isopropanol = 4% Ethyl sulfate = 1% Polydimethylsiloxanes Silicon oil = <9% Silicic acid (H4SiO4), tetraethyl ester, hydrolysis products with chlorotrimethylsilane = <9% Siloxanes and Silicones, di-Me, hydroxy-terminated = <9%
What's with the ingredients of Rain-X? Is it basically snake oil and placebo or does it actually have a consistent consistency?
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Slacker wrote:

It's proprietary formula so not surprising to not find precise formulation. I posted the constituents from the MSDS earlier in the thread. It's a water/methanol carrier w/ a small amount of another organic as the water shedding agent...
In general, to find out stuff like this about proprietary formulations, look for the MSDS -- it's required to list ingredients and general range of amounts although not exact formulation as noted above.
--
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Yes sir. Trade secret stuff.
Did you say once? Bring in the Black Hawks or words to that affect?
The MSDS I recall mentioned protected formulas. Secret stuff. Never clear to the consumer.
-- Oren
"I don't have anything against work. I just figure, why deprive somebody who really loves it."
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Actually, you are quite wrong. It is NOT required to list ingredients and general range. It is only required to list HAZARDOUS ingredients. You can completely avoid registering inert compounds, if you wish.
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On Sat, 06 Oct 2007 20:42:49 -0500, dpb wrote:

MSDS?
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So there MAY be silicones in RainX???
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Slacker wrote:

http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 03038

http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 013001
http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 037001
http://householdproducts.nlm.nih.gov/cgi-bin/household/brands?tbl=brands&id 03042

WTF are you talking about? You've checked 3 different Rain-X branded products (washer fluid, original, and "windshield wax") plus one completely un-related product that isn't even Rain-X! Of COURSE the formulations are different! Sheesh.
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Careful, that steel wool can ruin many new windshields. Some seem much more prone to scratching than they used to be. Perhaps they put some sort of coating now?
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Sell the car. You're too stupid to own one.
1) you couldn't handle instructions written for somebody with a 4th grade education and successfully followed by a hundred thousand people. You used too fucking much.
2) you couldn't figure out how to open a web browser, point it to a search site like google, and then come up with a clever search string like "how does an idiot like me remove rain-x?" Or perhaps just the last two words; first match: http://www.windtrax.com/featured_products/25_rain-x.asp It's water soluble. Use water and a cotton cloth.
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give the windshield a good scrubbin' with an SOS pad. That'll get rid of the rainx and the bugs.
s

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NOOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!!!! I used to do that all the time on my older cars. Then I did a tiny spot on my '01 LeSabre and it scratched the hell out of it.
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Did not.
steve

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Really? What were those marks?
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I doubt Rain-X is the culprit. If applied properly, Rain-X is VERY good at what it is designed to do -- let rainwater blow off the windshield in the airstream without using wipers. "Spotty" film could be the result of tree sap, pollen, bugs, tar or a combination.
Instead of trying to use the wipers to clean the windshield, clean it by hand thoroughly, then get new wiper blades. You may have to use an ammonia cleaner or other "heavy duty" cleaner along with a nylon scrubber pad.
Once the windshield is clean, you can try Rain-X if you want. However, do NOT apply Rain-X to a dirty windshield! It won't "fix" ANYthing!
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On Sun, 7 Oct 2007 10:34:12 -0000, John Weiss wrote:

I looked more closely at the windshield in the early morning hours just now. The spotty film is all over the windshield - everywhere. I really doubt tree sap would be everywhere. Pretty much, it has to be something that was 'smeared' on somehow since every inch of the windshield is covered.
Funny thing, today it was damp enough for fog to be on the inside and I noticed even the inside had the spotty film. It's BOTH on the inside and on the outside. Jeeeezus.
I tried the brake cleaner for about 20 minutes and I hope that works. I rubbed with a white towel and applied the brake cleaner from a spray can. The stuff dries pretty quickly so I had to keep applying it. You can get high in my car now, just sitting there, so I left the windows open. We'll see if it works to get rid of whatever it is that is smeared on both the inside and the outside of the windshield.
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I have found that Rain-X is best used by someone who spends a lot of time on the highway - not piddling around town.
It works best at speeds OVER 35 m.p.h., but, as you are experiencing, tends to create a "haze" when using the wipers.
But, you wouldn't believe how well it works on the highway - especially when passing a tractor-trailer and driving through the "rooster tail" with the wipers turned OFF!
When I traveled heavily, I used it. Now that I don't travel that much, I don't use it any more.
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On Sun, 07 Oct 2007 05:52:03 -0500, * wrote:

I would think that Rain-X shouldn't be sold much in coastal California since it almost never rains here. Yes, the song is wrong. When it does rain, it just drizzles all day. So Rain-X is all bad and never gets to be good.
I grew up in Florida so I certainly know what real rain is. Out here in California, it won't rain a drop for ten months, and then for two months, there's wet air for weeks. But not really rain. I've been here five years now and haven't seen a real rain yet.
Point is, I want to get that horrid rain-x off my windshield! I sure hope the brake cleaner, recommended by Kraagen, works. Time will tell.
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I used a glass cleaning product from the FLAPS that has some clay dispersed in a solvent system. The clay is not abrasive to glass, but provides a large surface area which helps compete for the surface active materials in RainX and the like.
No magic bullet...just elbow grease.
For all those who like RainX, good on ya'. I dont. I applied it properly, and just dont like the effect.
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on 10/7/2007 12:21 PM hls said the following:

Like jewelers rouge?

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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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