cutting ABS in situ - any super tools?


Thanks for the assist in plumbing in my new toilet location. That was successful!
Now - while I have the ceiling out, I have to cut out and replace a rather convoluted bit of plumbing that has been leaking over the years.
It is very difficult access, and I was wondering if anyone has tips or tricks on what options there are to use to cut the ABS piping in place? I'll have a tough time getting in with a hacksaw and there is a lot of copper in close proximity so I doubt I can use a 'saws all'. I had thought a grinding/cutting wheel on a drill.
It is a combination of 3" waste, and 2" and 1 1/2".
Thanks.
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Cable saw
http://www.finehomebuilding.com/PDF/Free/021160066.pdf
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Thanks! It sure pays to not be afraid to ask!!!!
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A corollary question is trying to fit everything back in to line up once almost everything is glued in place. Since it is all attached, I have *very* little movement possible on the assembly to try to get the collars, extra pipe and the waste assemblies back into the same area and to line u p exactly. Is there some sort of coupling that allows a 'butt fit' and then you put it on after the fact? I have seen flexible rubber ones with an outside metal sleeve presumably for areas where you need to remove things, but again fitting it in on the last part of the assembly once all the rest is glued is the issue.
I'm having difficulty describing exactly what the problem is, but hopefully folks here will get the gist of it.
thanks again....
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Yes, two options:
You should be able to get an ABS repair coupling, which is a coupling without a central ridge. Then as long as you have a long enough straight section next to your "butt splice", you can slide it over one end, assemble everything else, mark where the coupling will end up on each side of the butt joint, apply glue to that area (liberally, since you won't be able to put any glue on the coupling itself),and then slide the coupling over.
An alternative is the metal shielded rubber fittings you mentioned. The ones for aboveground work include a full metal shield the whole length of the coupling. What you do with it is slide the shield on one side, put the rubber coupling on one end, and then roll back the free end of the rubber coupling over the other end of the coupling. Like if you were folding a cuff in the leg of a pair of pants. Then you can assemble the rest of the work, and when you are done unroll the rubber coupling onto the other piece of pipe, slide the metal shield into place, and tighten it with the appropriate torque wrench.
Cheers, Wayne
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thank you! I think armed with a cable cutter (I looked on line and HD has them for like $5) and that ridge less abs repair coupling you mention I should (hopefully he said) be able to tackle this. I am sure going to think once , twice, three times, before I hack it all out ....
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Send the family away for the day, keep a car and driver handy for making last-minute trips to the local hardware store for whatever part you forgot( there's sure to be at least one). If you feel unlucky, set up a video camera and be prepared to see yourself on America's Funniest Home Videos.
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wrote:

You forgot to fire up "Mission Impossible" on the stereo system while I attempt it .....
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Nice article. Thanks.
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wrote:

p.s. The taping together of the cleaner & glue can is a gem.
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Red Green wrote:

That is nice, maybe they won't tip over as easy. Maybe add a 3rd can for stability. One thing in there I don't agree with is adding glue to the outside of the joint after the joint is glued together. If that extra glue is needed, then the joint is bad.
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Tony wrote:

I thought I saw somewhere that for ABS, extra glue outside the joint is bad - that it weakens the pipe or something.
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Bob F wrote:

It's not good on the outside, but it's really bad on the inside of the joint. If there is a big glob of wet glue on the inside, then the pipe is put into service/filled with water, there is no way inside for air to get to the glue. So the glob of uncured glue works it's way out to air by dissolving through the joint again until it reaches air. You don't want cured joints getting dissolved from the inside out with pressure on them. That's why they say to use less glue on the female fitting, so it doesn't get pushed inside and take weeks to actually cure. I normally wipe away the extra glue on the outside, NEVER put more on like in that article. On the outside also excess glue will form a skin on top and keep wet glue against the fresh joint not allowing it to fully cure in a reasonable time.
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A PVC cable saw is just the ticket. http://plumbing.hardwarestore.com/52-301-misc-plumbing-tools/pvc-cable-saw-603468.aspx
R
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wrote:

Never heard of a cable saw but then again my actual plumbing experience is very limited. Thanks to you and BSAKing for mentioning.
Sounds like with the limited working space an oscillating tool might be the ticket. The cable saw might give a cleaner and straighter cut though if any of the cut ends need to be preserved.
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.http://plumbing.hardwarestore.com/52-301-misc-plumbing-tools/pvc - cabl...
Thanks Rico....I gotta get me one of those before I need it.
cheers Bob
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I prefer an older hand miter saw but you won't have room for that either.
I can't say where I saw it but I know I saw a handle made to fit a sawsall blade for work in close quarters.
Grinding/cutting wheel on a drill is a great way to break a wrist.
Colbyt
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Colbyt wrote:

There are small handles that hold hacksaw blades.
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