Cordless Phone

Can someone recommend a cordless phone that rings LOUD? My parents recently replaced their phone with one that they don't hear easily. It's only been a week and already I've run over there a couple times afraid that they were laying somewhere unconscious only to find that they didn't hear the phone. I went to Target, Bestbuys and Kmart to take a look but you couldn't hear the ringer before buying. Of course they all said, "Just bring it back if it's not loud enough." I'd like to just take one more trip to the store.
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If you can't find a phone with a loud enough ringer, you can always add a ringer.
http://www.radioshack.com/product.asp?catalog%5Fname=CTLG&product%5FidC-175
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Radioshack also has a phone for the hard of hearing called Clarity by Waker?, lighted ringers and all sorts of accesories. you will find what you need there.
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I have the Radio Shack Foneflasher II in the garage woodshop where earmuff for hearing protection is a must. The device has a loud ringer and a strobe light with a control for either or both. Can't imagine life without it. My hearing "aid" barely hears the phone with nothing running except maybe me.
On Wed, 9 Mar 2005 09:22:59 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (m Ransley) wrote:

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I bought a vtech at COSTCO. Level 6 can be heard outside. You can also adjust the volume of the handset when talking.
Consider getting a set of cordless phones 2 or 3 handsets. That way there will be stereo and they do not have to walk very far to get the phone.
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I have one of the first 5.8 GHz models to come out from V-Tech that has an adjustable ringer. I always keep it on the lowest setting because it is too damn loud. Just go to the store and fill up your shopping cart with as many cordless phones you can. One by one you will find the one that is just right.
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wrote:

Try this online source for a separate ringer that is adjustable (can be made loud). This is a company that sells electronic devices for the hard of hearing.
http://www.marilynelectronics.net/products/amplified-telephone-accessories/ringmax.htm
My wife and I have bought amplified phones here for my father in law, who is 93 and quite hard of hearing. They worked fine for quite a few years when he lived at home. Unfortunately, he has now reached an age where he cannot figure out how to turn on the phone amplifiers or put in his hearing aids, so we again have to shout. But he lives in an assisted living facility so we don't have to rush over.
Marilyn Electronics also sells an autodialing phone with an emergency pendant which we bought for my FIL. If someone falls and can't get up (to coin a phrase), punching the button on the pendant dials the phone and broadcasts a recorded emergency message to up to five different phone numbers.
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Some Panasonic cordless phones you can set the base to ring as well as the handset. It was always loud enough to hear in the condo's hallway.
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Kathy wrote:

Put an inexpensive standard phone on the same line. Mine rings very loudly, and they come in handy during power outages which occur fairly often here in Florida.
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I've been wearing hearing aids for a lot of years. My answer was to split the socket with a modular adaptor. I've got a really old Bell telephone for the ring (sits on top of a wooden dresser) and I've got an amplified handset phone for talking.
I don't know who was the ignorant half brained idiot who designs the phones for Radio Shack. Anyone who knows something about hearing loss knows that men lose high notes first, and most. So, tell me why the amplified phone has a ringer that is a really high note that I can't hear without my hearing aids?
This was one of the stupidest things I've ever known RS to do.
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Christopher A. Young
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There used to be mechanical "baseboard ringers". These would wire into the phone line, and screw to a baseboard or wall. So that when the phone rings, it echos and jangles through the house. An auxilliary ringer might make more sense than trying to find a cordless phone with a low tone ring. I doubt any of the half brained idiots who design cordless phones know that hard of hearing people are more likely to hear low notes.
Check garage sales for a mechanical bell phone.
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We recently got a Uniden three handset model. I too am hard of hearing and I was happily surprised that I can hear these units. (There is a big choice of different ringing tones.) ds

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