Clothes dryer taking too long

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We have a Frigadaire clothes dryer that is about 7 years old. On the "normal" setting it used to dry the clothes in 50 minutes. Then we had to start adding 15 minutes to get them dry. Now an additional 30 minutes isn't enough. Is there something we can do to fix it, other than call a repairman?
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wrote:

Without any more detail, my first thought is lint buildup in the exhaust, and/or kinked exhaust hose?
Last time I fabbed up a dryer vent I used 4" ducting, rigid elbows with a section of "flex duct" (not dryer duct) in between so that it wouldn't collapse although it still gathers a little lint - no dryer's lint filter is 100% efficient. If nothing else lint likes to collect in the little louvers of the vent to the outside.
If that doesn't work, post back, and let us know if gas/electric, and anything else you can think that might be pertinent?
nate
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wrote:

The first answer is always lint buildup in either the internal ducts of the dryer or the vent hose. Go outside and see how strong/hot the exhaust is at the vent.
First, obviously, make sure the vent is opening properly. I've removed hand fulls of lint from right inside the vent opening.
Next, disconnect the vent hose at both ends and look for obstructions.
Finally, check the internal vents for lint buildup. That's a little more work, but doable if you are at all handy..
You didn't say whether it was gas or electric, so any more speculation wouldn't be worth the time it would take to type it.
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Clean the lint trap.
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We always do that.
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wrote:

You should have said so in your original message.
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My guess:
The OP didn't mention that because (s)he may not have made the connection that a blocked lint trap could extend the dry time.
I'll bet a lot of people clean the lint trap because the instructions say too but don't really understand why they are doing it.
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 13:21:49 -0500, Jan Philips

Sometimes there is a build up in the back of the dryer where the discharge hose connects. BTDT. I only noticed it when I had the dryer out to change the drive belt for the drum.
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yesterday i pulled my gas dryer apart its about 15 years old and had a tremendous mount of lint buildup..
i think i will replace the rollers they are noisey and binding.
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Check to see if you have a separate fuse for the dryer. Even tho mine is connected to a circuit breaker, it has it's own fuse near the dryer as well.
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Huh?
What would a fuse possibly have to do with extended drying times?
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wrote:

Assuming this is electric, the first thing I check is the heating element.
Hold the safety switch and start the dryer with the door open. You should see 2 element coils in the back glowing. If you only see 1, or they don't glow brightly, the element is bad. I think they tend to run about $100.
You should consider posting/searching the model number, which is probably inside the door. -----
- gpsman
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On Mon, 14 Feb 2011 10:15:08 -0800 (PST), gpsman

There is a triangular-shaped heating element, which is working.

Frigidare model GLEQ2152ESO : http://www.searspartsdirect.com/partsdirect/part-model/Frigidaire-Parts/Dryer-Parts/Model-GLEQ2152ES0/1428/0151200?searchedModel=gleq2152&blt 
That shows the triangular heating element, which is working. I need to check the exhaust duct.
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Jan Philips wrote:

Do the clothes get hot? No, check the element, yes, check the air flow.
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In typed: :: We have a Frigadaire clothes dryer that is about 7 years :: old. On the "normal" setting it used to dry the clothes :: in 50 minutes. Then we had to start adding 15 minutes to :: get them dry. Now an additional 30 minutes isn't enough. :: Is there something we can do to fix it, other than call a :: repairman? -- :: Replace you know what by j to email
Based on your question and apparent complete lack of knowledge on the subject, I'd say call a repairman if you check the lint filter, pipe to exit from the buildint, and varmint protection at the same point. That's not meant as an insult; just an observation. Check the exhaust from the machine to exit point first, then if nothing plugged, call for repair. It could be one of a few things but it sure sounds like a plugged output. HTH,
Twayne`
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I had a similar problem with a gas dryer - irrelevant to you - and it was advised here to replace several parts. It happened to involve fairly comprehensive disassembly of the machine, which I was able to do with videos and instructions for my particular model found on the web.
The thing that is important in your circumstance: others have mentioned the buildup of lint. When I had the machine apart, the amount of lint throughout the machine was remarkable. Much was inside, or just past, the compartment into which the user-cleanable lint screen slides. But there was lint build-up everywhere. Between the vacuum cleaner, brushes, and leaf blower I got the machine pretty clean.
If you could at least clean out the cavity into which the lint screen goes, either using someone with small hands, a vacuum cleaner's narrow nozzle attachment, or by blasting it with a compressor or leaf blower, one would expect at least a substantial improvement in your drying time.
Art
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On Feb 14, 3:16pm, snipped-for-privacy@unisys.com (Arthur Shapiro) wrote:

Based on the problem you found, your dryer likely had a very long vent run with numerous elbows, right? Not on an outside wall with short direct flow, correct?
Joe
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Joe, if this was directed to me (the take apart the whole thing guy) rather than to the OP: No. The dryer is up against the garage wall with a short run of flexi to the outside - a foot or thereabouts. Every month or so I reach in from the outside wall (a little flap actuated by the dryer's air flow protects it) and pull out some lint. Obviously the normal lint screen does a very imperfect job, even cleaned faithfully every use.
Art
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You are right. When the inspector inspected the house before we bought it, he noted that. Rather than going to a short route out the side of the house, it makes two or three turns and goes out the roof.
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wrote:

Several manufacturers call for rigid metal duct, instead of the coiled flexible stuff. They are Whirlpool, Amana, General Electric, Frigidaire, Kitchenaid, and Maytag. It's amazing how many new installations have tried to sneak the coiled stuff by in the wall. Damned difficult to clean out, quick to build up lint, and so restrictive to flow. It's the old "this is the way we've always done it" routine.
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