Clothes Dryer Caution


Hi,
If you use dryer sheets in your clothes dryer, remove the lint filter. After you remove the lint, run water into the filter. If you see puddles of water, that is due to the invisible film caused by the dryer sheets. At least once every 6 months, use hot soapy water and a tooth brush or other type of brush and clean the filter.
There has been cases where this blocked filter has caused a failure in the heating element. Also, there is the possibility that it can cause a fire.
John
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On 01/30/2010 08:22 AM, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

If there was film there, no lint would catch there because no air would flow through. I do not have that problem. Maybe your clothes are too wet and your washer ringer is broken.
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:22:46 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.netwrote:

Not if the dryer is working properly in the first place and the screen is cleaned with each new load. I have a 30 year old Kenmore Heavy-Duty that has been through roughly 5000 loads most of which included dryer sheets and there is no evidence of any film. And I have never rinsed the screen in water.
I do however see a possible scenario that might produce some film. This being really wet, poorly rinsed clothes overloaded into a dryer that wasn't circulating air and heating properly in the first place.
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On Jan 30, 9:28 am, Jeff The Drunk wrote:

Don't shoot the messenger, but if you trust snopes.com, the OP is correct...and the problem can extend to other parts of the dryer also.
I have tried the "water test" and I did indeed find that while water went through the screen at the first attempt, the flow was visibly improved once I washed the screen. Sure, you can blame it on dust and other residue, but if you trust snopes, the dryer sheets could certainly have been part of the issue.
Stolen without permission from:
http://www.snopes.com/inboxer/household/dryer.asp
*** Begin Stolen Text ***
"So, keeping the lint filter clean is one simple way to increase the efficiency and lifespan (and decrease the operating costs) of your dryer. Just removing the lint from the filter isn't always enough - the fine mesh of most dryer filters can be clogged in ways that aren't obvious at a casual glance. As suggested by the piece quoted above, softener sheets can cause waxy build-ups on lint screens that require a little extra effort - usually no more than a quick scrub and rinse in warm, soapy water - to remove.
Many modern dryers also use moisture sensors rather than ordinary timed cycles, and residue from dryer sheets can coat the sensors and interfere with their ability to function properly. Cleaning the sensor screen with a little detergent and a soft brush, and wiping off the sensor itself with a cotton ball and some rubbing alcohol can rectify this problem.
*** End Stolen Text ***
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Who/what died and left Snopes as an unchallanged expert?
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wrote:

You did, of course, notice my disclaimer of "If you trust snopes..."
I also related a personal experience.
I also found this..
http://www.truthorfiction.com/rumors/d/dryer-sheets.htm
and this...
http://urbanlegends.about.com/library/bl_dryer_lint_filter.htm
and this...
http://www.hoax-slayer.com/dryer-lint-filter.html
True, no one died and left *any* of these sites as unchallenged experts. Each and every one of us has the choice to believe the information presented...or not.
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On Sat, 30 Jan 2010 08:22:46 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I can't understand people's fascination with fabric softeners. They're dumping a load of toxic chemicals onto their clothing and then wearing them to allow the skin to absorb the nasty gunk - sorta like a nicotine patch. Besides the health risk, fabric softeners inhibit the material's ability to absorb water by coating the fibers with chemicals. I use old towels to dry my cars after washing, and early on I noticed that the towels would more or less just push the water around instead of sucking it up. When the car finally dried, you could see the streaks on the surface where the chemical residues from the towels had remained. Same goes for polishing the wax off the car - using a terry-cloth towel that was washed with fabric softener, the wax job looked like it was buffed with a mini-notched trowel. The fabric simply couldn't do the job for which it was intended. I haven't used Downy or Bounce or Sta-Puf or any of those toxic-waste-dumps in a bottle for years, and I really enjoy the feeling when the towel I used after showering dries me off. Isn't that what it's supposed to do? If you ask me, fabric softeners are a huge waste of money.
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Same sorta thing here. Am complaining to s.market that one cannot (except rarely) buy dish detergent and sometimes laundry detergent also, that do not contain that darn 'pseudo lemony smell' whatever chemical it happens to be. Personally not allergic to it but don't like the artificial smell it imparts. Also it may just be another pollutant to the environment? We don't use dryer sheets; wonder why anybody would bother! And again more chemicals, no wonder we have such high rates of asthma and allergies etc.
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On 1/31/2010 03:52, JKevorkian wrote:

Fabric softener should not be used on towels for the reason you experienced.
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