cheap primer ok for garage?

I just drywalled my garage and am ready to begin painting. I know I need to use a primer first, but does it matter much if I use a cheap primer? HD had glidden for about $35 for a pva primer...Kilz is about $70 for 5 gallons buckets. I don't want to put something up that will peel off with my final coat of regular paint.
I always thought Kilz was really for special cases (water damage..etc).
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You don't need Klitz, it's for water stains etc. Use a good oil based primer and if you know your final colour make sure that you have the primer pre-tinted to match. Think of it this way though using a really really cheap primer is like using a cheap piece of tape and then putting expensive duct tape over top of it, since the duct tape sticks to the cheap "primer" tape which one do yout hink is going to be the problem? This is why in a lot of placefs you'll see the paint pealing off with the primer still attached.
A good latex primer will be fine.

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HotRod wrote:

There are primers made specifically for new drywall. The ones I have seen were latex.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Despite the other response - You do NOT need oil primer. The PVA primer is perfect for you application. As long as there is no dust from sanding the seams you should be fine.
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Sorry I actually meant Latex Primer, my fingers meant oil primer... Use a good Latex primer :-)
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In our house we applied a coat of PVA primer, then two coats of paint.
In our garage, we simply applied two coats of paint over the bare drywall.
Both methods turned out great.
Anthony
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Thanks, but is there a difference between the cheap PVA primers like Glidden and the more expensive ones as far ad adhesion etc.?
HerHusband wrote:

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There's probably not a huge difference between between cheap (but reasonable) primer and expensive primer on fresh drywall, as long as it covers reasonably well.
It'll matter with old previously painted walls a lot more. The more expensive stuff will cope with difficult situations (dirty, incompatible paints, etc) better.
With paint, of course, it can matter quite a bit.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
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Chris Lewis ( snipped-for-privacy@nortelnetworks.com) said...

The big issue with new drywall is that it provides a surface with varying ability to soak in moisture. The paper surface of the drywall will soak in moisture at one rate, and the places where mud is will soak in at a different rate that varies with the thickness of the mud.
I suspect this is more of an issue with latex paint than oil, but regardless a primer should be used in order to seal the surface so that paint will not have its moisture wicked out of it at varying speeds.
Without primer, you will likely see the places where mud is and where it isn't in the finished paint job.
Look for a primer that has "high hiding" on its label. Better primers will likely only need a single coat, while cheaper ones may need two (making them about the same cost anyways).
When we built our home, we went with a cheaper primer as we planned to apply two coats: first the walls were primed and trim was primed before cutting and installiing; after the trim was installed and nail holes were filled, a second coat of primer over the trimmed wall was applied.
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Calvin Henry-Cotnam
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I have no idea how the various primers compare. We used the Glidden PVA because it was cheaper than buying the equivalent amount of paint. Otherwise we would have just put on an extra coat of the matching paint.
The main advantage of primers like Kilz is they'll cover problem surfaces nicely. For example, we painted my in-laws house several years ago, and despite scrubbing the walls and ceiling with TSP, there was still an oil film covering everything. It bled right through multiple coats of standard primer and paint. But, Kilz covered it nicely, and we could then paint over that.
Anthony
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It's a garage, not a living room. Slap some cheap paint on it. In a few years go back and do it again, it will be dirty by then anyway.
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Joseph Meehan

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Piece of trivia regarding Behr paint: Behr makes 2 primers for their latex paints. One for glossy and one for flat paints. I called them up once and they told me that the primer for glossy is actually superior and slightly more expensive and can be used for flat paints too and they recommend it. They sell the cheap flat paint primer to have a competitive product out there and apparently it is good enuf for flat paint work.

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Kilz makes several products for various applications. Their oil base interior primer is the most widely known. Try the following link for info on the eight different primers they offer.
http://www.kilz.com/pages/default.aspx?NavID "
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ALWAYS use Polyvinyl Acetate (PVA) primer over NEW drywall or newly textured surfaces before painting anything else. Do NOT use an oil (alkyd) primer for drywall. Be sure to roll it on as evenly as you can -- do not just spray it on, it must be worked into the surface.
Jeff
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