Changing 120v lighting to 240v

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On Sat, 18 Sep 2010 09:52:52 -0700, Smitty Two

Which is what I plan to do, and have already purchased a surplus the last time they were on sale.
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On Sep 18, 10:34 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

You will always be able to get an incansdesant bulb, cfls just wont work long over a stove, in an oven, or in a frige and garage door opener.
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On 9/18/2010 5:20 PM, ransley wrote:

opener since they came out. I don't know what is the issue here. I 1st put them in because that opener said 40 watts max for each of 2 bulbs. I got the largest CFL and even with the slow warm up, gave be more light right from turn on.
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wrote:

Let me guess, you live in Florida? CFL bulbs work fine if the winter temps dont get below freezing (32 deg.F). But try using them in the northern states where the winter temps stay at zero for weeks, and can drop as low as MINUS 40 deg. F At that extreme low, NO FLORESCENT BULBS WILL WORK.
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On Sep 21, 12:50 am, snipped-for-privacy@myplace.com wrote:

== Not true. I have two cfl perimeter lights that are switched on every night 365 days of the year. They take a bit longer to light when cold but they do work even when switched on when it is -40. One just has to give them time to light. both perimeter lights are in glass enclosures as in a porch light and I haven't tried bare bulbs outside as it is not recommended and very likely wet snow would cause them to break. ==
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wrote:

In the middle of winter, I may be fixing the toilet in the house. I need a few tools, and all my tools are in the garage since I do not have a basement. The garage is not heated. When I go to the garage, I want the 6 tools I need in the house *NOW*. I;m not going to stand in the very cold garage for 10 minutes waiting for these CFLs to get bright enough so I can see what's in my toolbox, before I can get what I need and go back in the house. And last winter we had a few days where the temp was in the -30s. I went to the garage and those CFLs NEVER got bright. All 4 of them in my garage combined put out less light than one candle would produce. Maybe it's just the brand I have, but either way, I am not willing to go back to the caveman era with lighting just because the government came up with another stupid idea which they claim will save energy. Sure it does save a little energy when they work, like in a heated house, but it's no saving in my pocket when the bulbs cost 20 times what a common bulb would cost. (like $.25 for common bulb, and $5.00 for a CFL). CFLs work fine in some applications, but not in all. As soon as the outdoor temps start getting down around +30, I'll be replacing all the CFLs with common bulbs in my garage.
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A 100 watt load would consume half the current if you double the voltage. However where I come from, you can't "paint the white red", you need to separate the ground and common. Therefore the need to run either 2 14/2 wires or a 14/3.
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If all you have is 240V loads you don't need a common (neutral). If you do, "painting the white, red" doesn't help. You have some idiots (likely union electricians) running your local government.
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wrote:

switch - otherwise one line is always HOT (both lines are HOT with the switch on)
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On Sep 20, 11:03 am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Well, duh! How is this any different than any other 240V circuit, three-conductor or otherwise?
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wrote:

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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 16:48:43 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

The entire circuit, obviously. As long as the "white" wire is in each box it's not a big deal. It's *exactly* the same issue whether or not painting the white, red, is permissible.
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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 18:28:58 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

american system, running 240 volts, NEITHER wire is at ground potential - so the wires need to be black and red. No white wire required - and BOTH lines need to be switched
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On 09/20/2010 09:46 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It's standard practice to use 2-wire (with ground) cable for pure 240V circuits (e.g. water heater, air conditioner) and to simply reidentify the white as a hot at each box with a ring of black or red tape. Now if you are pulling THHN in pipe it would make sense to pull red and black, but I'm not aware of special 240V romex with red/black or other non-white, non-grey, non-green colors.
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Right. Other than three conductor cable, neither have I.
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On Sep 20, 11:59 pm, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

In fact, 12/2 romex (generically NMD-90 in Canada, same stuff as romex but we have it labeled special 'cause we like to pay more) is available in the big boxes here with red and black conductors and an all-red exterior sheath. It's marketed for 240V baseboard heaters, and it's been around since at least the early 90's. Dunno if it was required by code as opposed to flagging the white with red tape.
Blue-sheath 14/2 has also recently appeared to make afci circuits stand out, apparently for the convenience of the inspectors when they eyeball the rough-in. Along with yellow-sheathed 12/2, I don't think code requires it, I think it's something the industry came up with.
Chip C Toronto
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On Thu, 23 Sep 2010 11:54:57 -0700 (PDT), Chip C

to help my father wire houses way back in the "live better electrically" and "gold Medallion Home" days - but I could not find a refference to support my memory.
The darn stuff is called HEATEX, now that I come to think of it.
For all the disbelievers/unbelievers, just google "Heatex Cable -marker -label -labels"
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I have never seen /2 without a white wire. I'm quite sure none of the stores around here sell anything with blue insulation, or without a white wire.
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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 21:46:27 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes, you've still added nothing to the discussion. In a purely 240V circuit there is NO NEED for the white wire. See the part about painting the white wire red. This is very common and outside of some areas, evidently, where union thugs run things, is perfectly acceptable.
- so the wires need to be black and red.
No, they really need to be anything other than green (or green/yellow) and white. See the part about painting the white wire red.

...and now you're agreeing with me that you've added nothing to the conversation.
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On Mon, 20 Sep 2010 22:57:52 -0500, " snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz"

strictly 240, neither line is "dead. BOTH are LIVE. Live lines need to be switched.- and identified.
So OK - not white or green - but switched.
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