Ceramic nonstick pans

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On 03/17/2013 08:22 AM, Tegger wrote:

Provided you don't overheat the pan, yes.
Teflon itself is nonreactive, which accounts for its nonstick properties.
Jon
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On 3/17/2013 2:41 PM, Jon Danniken wrote:

Teflon was thoroughly tested for toxicity and was approved for cookware by the FDA even though at the time it was not necessary due to the housewares exemption.
Teflon pyrolysis gives off toxic fumes, the worst being perfluoroisobutylene which for man causes polymer fume fever or flue like symptoms for a short period. If you have a bird like a canary in the kitchen, it could be killed by the fumes. This is why they used to take canaries into mines to see if there were poisonous fumes as the bird with its high respiratory rate would succumb to the fumes before it affected the miners.
Recently there has been a concern about perfluorooctanoic acid used in the Teflon process.
http://www.cancer.org/cancer/cancercauses/othercarcinogens/athome/teflon-and-perfluorooctanoic-acid--pfoa
In cookware, I don't know if any is present but if any I suspect in the parts per billion region or not enough to worry about.
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On 3/17/2013 7:50 AM, bob haller wrote:

cite

cite
Did you forget to say you can't get insurance for houses with teflon in them?
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Tom Watson
Special to The Seattle Times
It's easy to guard against the obvious kitchen dangers, such as a hot stove or sharp knives. But when you hear that pots and pans may be toxic, what do you do then? Give up and just order takeout?
The good news is that most cookware will not put you at risk during normal use. But you do need to be aware of potential hazards with nonstick pots and pans. To make sure you don't cook up problems along with your scrambled eggs, follow these guidelines when buying and using cookware:
• Make sure nonstick pans stay nontoxic. The coating on nonstick cookware contains a chemical called polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE). DuPont's Teflon is the most well-known brand. When heated to very high temperatures, this coating creates hazardous fumes.
The synthetic chemical perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used to make this nonstick coating and has various other industrial applications. PFOA can cause cancer and birth defects in animals and may pose a risk to humans, according to Consumer Reports. The Society of the Plastics Industry, a major trade group, acknowledges that PFOA is found in the blood of 95 percent of the U.S. population "and is persistent in the environment, even in remote locations."
However, it appears that problems with nonstick pans occur only after overheating. Lab tests recently conducted by Consumer Reports showed that when new and aged pans were heated to 400 degrees, no significant emissions of PFOA occurred.
If you use nonstick pans, you should be able to cook meat or eggs just fine if you heat the pan to medium (300 to 400 degrees) and then reduce it to low (200 to 300 degrees). DuPont does not recommend heating Teflon pans higher than 500 degrees.
Remind everyone in your household to be vigilant when using nonstick cookware. A preheated pan on high heat can exceed 600 degrees in two to five minutes, according to the Environmental Working Group (EWG).
• Keep the birds flying. Birds have extreme sensitivity to fumes from nonstick pans. In the past 25 years, nonstick cookware heated at high temperatures has been linked to the deaths of hundreds of pet birds, EWG says.
Since all it takes is one distraction to result in an overheated pan, the Green Guide recommends bird owners replace all nonstick cookware. They should also avoid using nonstick cookie sheets, Teflon-lined ovens and burners lined with Teflon drip pans.
The fumes from overheated nonstick cookware that kill pet birds can also produce flu-like symptoms in humans. Make sure your kitchen is well-ventilated.
• Don't get flaky. Particles from older nonstick pans can chip off and get into food. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has stated that these particles would pass through the body and not pose a health hazard. DuPont also insists these particles will not cause harm when ingested.
Still, I'd rather use salt and pepper. Get rid of nonstick pans when they start to flake. Consumer Reports says flaking can result in uneven heating that may accelerate toxic emissions.
Even if your pans have not started flaking, the Green Guide recommends replacing nonstick cookware after two years, since the coating may then begin to degrade.
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Bud a close friend called me to look at a investment property he was interested in. We looked at it and found knob and tube wiring in some areas of this triplex.
he was unable to obtain homeowners insurance, actually insurance just on the building, since it was a investment and he backed out of the deal.....
the building still sits on the market today unsold. his agent told him no one was able to get insurance and the property is detoriating and vandalized. the owner is hard nosed but will likely have to drop the price a lot to cover all new wiring. its in pittsburgh whicjh has strict laws about using only specifically licensed electricians. my buddy had a estimate of over 20 grand for all new service. no one has wanted to spend that much money.....
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On 3/17/2013 9:25 AM, bob haller wrote:

Does not support either of your statements. As the article and Jon D wrote do not use teflon pans at high temperatures.

Close friends call me too, but I don't write about it here.
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On 3/17/2013 7:43 AM, Mike Easter wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)

Another article http://www.cooksillustrated.com/equipment/overview.asp?docid%947 compares nonstick (PTFE) skillets that cost under $50. The winner (on page 2) was the T-fal pan. They still also liked a favorite expensive (All-Clad?) pan that did not perform as well because it had a lifetime warranty.
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I bought both the Yoshi Blue and the Green one. Fantastic performance...for a short period and then no better than a teflon coating, even wore out and started sticking sooner than teflon.
Those, of course, were the cheap end around $20. I also found dthat the producers don't seem to know how to build a flat bottom pan. Fine new but doesn't take long for the bottom to have a high spot in the middle.
Harry K
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We're currently using one that says "TRANSTHERM WMF W-B2-S" on the bottom. The surface finish, color, and texture greatly resemble Teflon, but the friction coefficient is higher. It does work pretty well at keeping food from sticking, better than non-coated pans, but you still often need to scrub to get /everything/ off. No ceramic we've used quite comes up to up to Teflon standards.
The WMF is my wife's pan. I prefer the ancient Wagner cast-iron pan that we've had in our family since the '50s. Food does sometimes stick, but comes off easily with a ScotchBrite pad.
My opinion is that if you want Teflon performance, buy a Teflon pan.
--
Tegger

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On 03/17/2013 08:18 AM, Tegger wrote:

Good luck doing that after 2015, when the federal "almost ban" takes place. I notice that many stores are already carrying replacement products, usually anodized aluminum, due to the toxic fumes they emit when idiot morons overheat the pans.
Jon
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.

One way to make teflon pans last longer is to reserve one or more for special use, where the non-stick surface is essential. For example, I have one pan that I use just for omeletes or similar light duty. By not using it for frying, higher temps, etc, the surface remains non-stick for a lot longer. The pan isn't anything special, either, just a Tfall, which isn't that expensive. Also IMO the perfectly smooth surface that you fequently find in less expensive pans is actually more slippery and releases food like omeletes better.
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On Sun, 17 Mar 2013 10:32:25 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net"

I have a small pan for my morning egg. Given the future availability, I may pick up one or two more to carry me for the rest of my life. A $15 pan is very suitable for that use.
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How is ceramic at heat transfer? I have a visions non-stich fry pan and I've got to say that glass is THE most useless material to make a frying pan out of.
m
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I guess they used them on the stove, but I only use my old corning ware in microwave.
Greg
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On Saturday, March 16, 2013 7:08:09 PM UTC-7, Daniel Prince wrote:

Consumer Reports' ratings of cookware sets, 6/2012:
http://img26.imageshack.us/img26/192/cookwarenonstickconsume.jpg
Generally, Teflon coatings stick the least, while ceramic-based coatings ev entually become somewhat sticky. And while you'd think ceramic coatings wo uld be more durable, that's not always the case, as demonstrated by Earth P an, which seems to vary all over in durability, depending on which version it is. Teflon on stainless steel holds up better than Teflon on aluminum b ut seems to be hard to find now.
More recently, Consumer Reports tested that green frying pan hawked in com mericals and found that it was durable but eventually started to stick some what.
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