Burying/combining utilities to garage

Hi, I just completed a second garage on my property. Planning on running most utilities out to it. Question is, can everything share the same conduit? Planning on having the following--
phone computer network (cat 5 cable) cable electric gas
My concern is interference of some sort with everything bundled together.
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On Sat, 01 Nov 2003 08:47:24 -0800, rud wrote:

Your computer network cable... If it's going in the conduit with the electrical, I would recommend getting a shielded cable, to cut down interference. Otherwise there will be more noise on the line and therefor more dropped packets. It will still work, but will be slower.
Carolyn
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The electric will need to be in a conduit by itself or if it is direct buried it will need to be kept separated from the other utilities by at least six inches. The separation required for gas may be greater so check the National Fuel gas code. The conduit for communications wiring or direct bury communications wiring should be kept separated from the electric power feeder by at least a half a foot to prevent interference with the communications signals. The gas line should be in the bottom of the trench to make it the least likely to be disturbed. Since I do not have access to the National Fuel Gas Code at home I cannot tell you how deep the trench needs to be for gas. It is good practice to bury a warning tape above fuel lines as well as electric lines but that is not required by the US National Electric Code.
If the trench will be 30 inches or more deep (0.75 meters) then you may want to consider improving the grounding of the entire property by installing a bare number two copper conductor in the bottom of the trench that runs from the bonded buss bar of the panel that supplies the feeder; which may or may not be your service equipment; to the Equipment Grounding Conductor buss bar of the panel in your new garage. If you use individual UF conductors directly buried at thirty inches of bury or more the bare number two can serve as the Equipment Grounding Conductor of the feeder. Taking that simple and relatively inexpensive step will markedly lower the impedance to ground of your entire electrical systems grounding electrode system. This will make your electrical system far more resistant to damage caused by surges and spikes as well as resistant to damage caused by lightning and accidental contact with higher voltage lines such as when a downed power line falls across the lines between the transformer and your home. Adding this extra grounding is certainly not required but I believe that it is a great thing to do if you are going to be trenching anyway. -- Tom H
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