Burglar alarms and home security

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wrote:

As for defeating the system - put OBVIOUS phone and cable connections - but actually dummies, where they would be expected, and hide the real ones. A cellular backup is almost standard equipment now on monitored systems - and the whole system is set up to run off a backup battery in case of power disconnect.
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On Apr 6, 3:39 pm, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I don't know about Canada, but when I checked about a year ago here in the USA there was quite a big price differential between a monitored service you can get via phone or internet connection and one that includes cellular backup. You could be paying $50 more a month for the cellular one. Whether it's worth it depends on what you have to protect, how prevalent crime is in your area, etc. I suspect any system that goes off is going to send 99% of the thieves running. You could probably find a sticker that says "Protected by a cellular system", even if you don't have one, which might add some discouragement.
I think for most people seeking one, a good system that is installed correctly, with loud sirens inside and outside the house, that is monitored in some way can be effective.
As for the OP's silent alarm so that police can catch the burglar, forget that. Police get lots of alarm calls and almost all of them are false. There is no guarantee as to how fast they will respond. You want the perp detered before he actually enters the building if possible. An alarm going off when they force a door or break glass can do that.
Same thing for the silent alarm so you can use your gun to defend your property. You want the burglar defeated before they even enter the house, by the alarm going off. Or failing that, as soon after they enter the house as possible. The gun is for last resort.
Also, some mention was made of having the alarm system contact a neighbor. In most cases, I think that is a bad idea with all kinds of problems. Ranging from the neighbor getting false alarm calls at 3AM. To, what do you want the neighbor to do? Go over and find out if a burglar is really there? How about the burglar attacks them or since the alarm should also have gone to the police, they show up and the neighbor winds up against the wall or worse?
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On Fri, 6 Apr 2012 10:28:39 -0700 (PDT), Robert Macy

My brother's vacation home/trailer was a target for theives until he installed an X10 alarm system with cameras and PC recorder - and a set of Fiamm air horms - all run off a good UPS system so it works even 8 hours after the power is disconnected.
One miscreant left a patch of denim with better than a square inch of skin/flesh from his shin on the "downspoout re-enforcement" at the back corner of the trailer when he headed for the bush when the flood-lights came on and blinded him.
That was the last episode - on a cold stormy winter night when the power was out in the whole area and the guy must have figured the "obvious" alarm system would be useless.
The neighbours know if they hear the air horn something untoward is going on at the place on the bend - and they are often there, cell phone in hand, by the time my brother is online checking out the cameras. The last time the neighbour had the police called within minutes. Didn't get the guy, but he spent a long cold (and apparently painfull) night in the bush, because the cops were around for quite some time waiting for him to come out. When my brother got there next morning he found tracks leading from the bush to a house down the way that is known to be trouble - no proof it was him, but apparently all his bad-news buddies now know it's not worth the effort.
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On 4/6/2012 3:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

My neighbor installed a ridiculously huge air horn, I don't think he ever got robbed.
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On 4/6/2012 3:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I had a friend who bought a small apartment complex from the city and had a problem with trespassers invading the place at night while he repaired the damaged done to the units by metal thieves. I gave him an Edwards 870P-N5 AdaptaHorn wired up to some motion detecting flood lights. We installed the lights/horn behind the complex where there was a barbed wire fence. One night he was awakened by the horn going off and the next morning he found bits of torn black cloth and bloody chunks of human flesh all over the barbed wire fence. Word got out and he had no more nightly visitations. ^_^
http://www.edwards-signals.com/index.cfm?pid%7&levelE
TDD
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Rebel1 wrote:

You'll get better answers in alt.security.alarms
its filled with professional installers.
--
I like refried beans. That's why I wanna try fried beans,
because maybe they're just as good and we're just wasting time.
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On 4/6/2012 10:12 AM, Rebel1 wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)33721382&sr=1-14#reader_1453732039

Sorry to read about your b/i. I know how it feels.
I don't think fake stickers are a bad idea at all.
A good insurance policy is a good idea too. If you have one that replaces stolen items at present value even better. You have to do a cost benefit analysis but for me having a good policy paid off well.
I had security doors installed. They really don't look that bad, or they didn't on my old house. Some say they are a hazard because they can be difficult to escape in case of a fire. It's something to consider.
http://www.fourseasonssunrooms.com/Doors/images/SDOption/defender_security_door.jpg
That way the burglars can't walk right out the front door with your stuff. They usually go with the path of least resistance. My neighbor got a little upset when I put mine in but too bad. They don't cost that much and he can buy his own if he doesn't like it.
I lived in a real high crime area (Abq NM) and after that we never got burgled again.
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gonjah <gonjah.net> wrote:

http://www.fourseasonssunrooms.com/Doors/images/SDOption/defender_security_door.jpg
I like fake or real visible cameras. If they are real, you got video. You also can see outside. I got some fake ones.
Greg
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On 4/6/2012 6:42 PM, gregz wrote:

When I lived in Abq. I had some problems with a wacko neighbor. A exterior camera would have been nice but lighting, cost and maintenance kept me from doing it. Didn't think about a fake one.
Anymore you gotta be real careful. Big Brother might be watching anywhere. ;)
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http://www.fourseasonssunrooms.com/Doors/images/SDOption/defender_security_door.jpg
What's to keep a burglar from breaking one of the side windows, which isn't covered by the security door, and simply reach in to undo the locks from inside? Do you have a double-cylinder deadbolt on the main door?
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make a side window that is not breakable. maybe 1/2" plexiglas or Lexan. it's kinda dumb to have a window right next to your door anyways.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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The idea is to make the neighbor's house look like an easier target than yours. In any case, the lock is there for the neighbor kids and the insurance company.
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On 4/7/2012 7:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@att.bizzzzzzzzzzzz wrote:

Yup. I already mentioned how my neighbor got po'ed when I installed security doors. His response was "They'll just go to the next house."
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wrote:

Someone here uses the tag line, "when seconds count, the police are only minutes away.
You want them away from the house and afraid to even try an actual break-in. Lights on motion detectors are the first line of defense. Next is an intrusion alarm for the doors and windows. That too, should turn on some light and sound an alarm.

Really? What if you come in second place in the contest? I'm prepared to defend my self and family, but my first preference is to avoid the confrontation. I don't practice with a gun every day so reality is, for safety, I'd rather keep it at the ready, but never used.

No extremes, but good locks are a start. Simple things like drilling through the window frame and inserting a nail helps keep them from being pried.

Yes
They are now considered a code violation in many places. One morning many years ago though, I found my back door window broken, but no entry thanks to a double key lock.

Real ones are better
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news:4a40d72f-8f94-4ef8-94ff-
<stuff snipped>
<<Thus, used the dead spaces under our cabinetry in bathroom and kitchen and built fake back walls into several closets. I converted the kickstep covers for the cabinetry to become removable. Each was held in place with those "push to open" latches. Contents under cabinets were those heavy coin collections etc, heavy, thin flat items, more than 200 lb total. The spaces made by the fake back walls in the closets were to enclose larger items, like sterlingware, special jewelry, etc. and wife's collection of furs. NOBODY knew about the false areas, except us.>>
Good ideas!
<<Then added a more conventional, and prominent, bolt down safe to occupy anyone who wanted to hang around and get the lollipop out of it.>>
Great idea. You KNOW they are going to waste their time trying to open or remove the safe. Every second you delay them with the decoy safe means it's one less second they can spend looking for the real treasure.
-- Bobby G.
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On 4/6/2012 11:12 AM, Rebel1 wrote:

(Amazon.com product link shortened)33721382&sr=1-14#reader_1453732039
You need to decide what your risk is, and who is likely to provide that risk. If your neighborhood has had few burglers your risk is probably low. If it has had many..... Are you really trying to protect valuables or are more concerned about personal safety if you are home during an attempted break-in? Are your valuables insured? Are they replaceable if stolen? How important would it be to replace them if only of sentimental value? Are the burglars you are concerned about likely to be amateurs or professional?
The answers to these questions will guide you to what type of security investment is most appropriate for your circumstances. There is not one optimal solution for all situations.
And, with the rare exception of certain types of military sites, almost every conceivable valuable and security protected place has been burglarized at one time or another. So, you need to realize that you will not be preventing burglary, only making it less likely.
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burglars often RETURN to places they burgled once,because now the owner has gotten NEW stuff to replace his stolen items.
--
Jim Yanik
jyanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

I'd like to see that theory validated by others in some real publications or news stories / interviews.
What you find that gets stolen is cash, prescription meds, jewlery, coins and guns. Electronic items are largely ignored (unless they're small enough to stuff into a knap-sack or pillow case).
Every home will have that same assortment of stuff - to one extent or another, so there's no real point to go back to the same house you've hit before because you can be assured of getting it somewhere else when-ever you want.
Now, whether or not a *different* thief will hit the same home that was robbed in the past, that's another issue, and if the two thiefs know each other and which homes they've each robbed.
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Not what the police told when my house was broken into once.
They told me that the burglars move on to the next target.
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Oh, and the 17 yr old punk ass kid was caught because he tried to push a window open and left palm prints. Needless to say, they already had his prints.
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