Building a treehouse in the redwood grove of a neighbor (pics included)

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On 9/29/2014 7:20 PM, Danny D. wrote:

Does PRC have more attorneys, or Mexicans?
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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No, that's pretty much correct (if rather dated). "Oriental" literally means somebody from "the East". Asia is usually defined as "East of the Urals". Both are somewhat vague terms with meanings that have changed over the centuries, but Wikipedia says the're pretty much the equivalent:
The Orient means the East. It is a traditional designation for anything that belongs to the Eastern world or the Middle East (aka Near East) or the Far East, in relation to Europe. In English, it is largely a metonym for, and coterminous with, the Continent of Asia.
Calling a Mexican a Spaniard is like calling somebody from the US "English" or "British". Rather than being insulted, I think people are just going to be puzzled over where you've been for the last 250 years.

Either, both, maybe neither (it probably depends on the crowd). Regardless of whether it's insulting, it's incorrect.
--
Grant



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On Mon, 29 Sep 2014 21:41:56 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I hear that about over engineering stuff. When I was getting ready to pour the floor for my shop I calculated the concrete thickness for the various machines and then though about what happens if I move a machine and then what happens if I buy a heavier machine or one with a smaller footprint and so on. Then I realized how pointless this was in my situation, So I had the concrete poured to 7 inch minimum thickness, had fiber put in the concrete, and I put rebar and wire mesh in place before the pour. It's a good thing too because I later bought a lathe that covers 10 square feet with the base and sits on 4 9 square inch pads and weighs 8000 lbs. Eric
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On 09/29/2014 6:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote: ...

8k/4/(9^2) --> 56 psi
Not much load, really.
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On 9/29/2014 7:42 PM, snipped-for-privacy@whidbey.com wrote:

Sounds like my elementary school lunch room monitor woman. We used to call her Bubbles.
. Christopher A. Young Learn about Jesus www.lds.org .
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G. Ross wrote, on Mon, 29 Sep 2014 20:38:51 -0400:

Good point, but, this *is* the Silicon Valley environ ...
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"Danny D." wrote:

---------------------------------------------- In days of yore I worked as a design engineer for heavy duty steel mill and foundry equipment, but that was then and this is now.
For designs involving steel cable and human safety, the basic safety factor applied was 5.
IOW, 14,000/5 = 2,800 pounds as the basic design limit.
Dynamic loading would apply another 50% derate.
IOW, 2,800*50% = 1,400 pounds for dynamic loads.
Based on the posts I have seen, your group needs some serious help before people get hurt or worse.
Lew Hodgett, PE Retired
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Lew Hodgett wrote, on Mon, 29 Sep 2014 18:29:57 -0700:

Times two cables, which is 5,600 pounds, at least. :)
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On 09/29/2014, 8:37 PM, Danny D. wrote:

My last comments - this is not looking so good..
Bending a cable around a support weakens the cable - there is a formula for that:
http://unirope.com/products/slings/wire-rope-slings/rigging-guidelines/dd-ratio-and-the-effect-on-sling-capacity/
So that derates the cable strength from 10% to 60% depending on the curve. Note too that they are using wooden standoff/chocks to hold the wire, I hope they chamfered a notch - but in any case the load is not consistent on the tree, rather it is concentrated on only a few of those wooden chocks. This is a derating aspect too.
Looking at picture:
https://c3.staticflickr.com/3/2944/15188634078_2b3de04150_c.jpg
It looks like the cable does a bit of a sharp bend where it leaves the standoff...this is potentially a real problem - kinks are possible. The pinching of the cable at the clamps also derates the cable strength...
Wire Rope is certainly varied in structure. However I do keep seeing the 1:5 load factor (1/5 of rating) in various Wire Rope 101 pamphlets...
It does appear that the folks selling wire rope are only too happy to advise in its use - your friends would be advised to show them the proposal for comment before they put too much weight on these wire ropes.
John
--
(Please post followups or tech inquiries to the newsgroup)
John's Jukes Ltd. 2343 Main St., Vancouver, BC, Canada V5T 3C9
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wrote:

You better check it. Wind loads can exceed the dead loads by many times. Wind loads may be the real issue.
?-)
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2014 23:20:40 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Not true. Since you are a volunteer and not an employee, you are complicit.
--
I kill-file all messages posted through Google Groups.

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That's generally considered offensive, racist, and ignorant.

Perhaps they have better manners.
--
Grant Edwards grant.b.edwards Yow! This PORCUPINE knows
at his ZIPCODE ... And he has
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On Mon, 22 Sep 2014 03:43:34 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

There is one picture of a guy standing right beside the tree. If he is 6' feet tall, then the top of the picture would be about 42 feet.

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"Danny D." wrote:

----------------------------------------------
"Lew Hodgett" wrote:

----------------------------------------------------- What I forgot to include was that the above design loads are for tensile loads.
Bending loads require a further derate.
The reader is left to determine the value from any decent structural engineering text.
And now you know one of the reasons why I'm retired.
Lew Hodgett, PE Retired
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On 9/30/2014 8:37 PM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

Sounds like not much fort, at derate we're going.
--
.
Christopher A. Young
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VinnyB wrote, on Tue, 30 Sep 2014 06:00:21 -0500:

The neighbor "pays" me, in free soda, although I am complaining about the intolerable working conditions nonetheless!
BTW, today we devised a (potentially ingenious) method to *level* the two cables.
I couldn't snap a picture because we were installing WiFi rooftop radios most of the day and I was using the cell phone for signal strength and interference observations, so the battery had died by the time we got to the treehouse.
However, I'll explain in words, and later snap a picture for you, as to how we devised a "tool" to measure the respective cable sag.
We made an 8-foot long T-Square out of two-by-fours, and we notched the upper outside two ends of the top horizontal bar of the wooden "T" for the cables to go in.
Then on the 8'foot long vertical leg of the huge T-Square, we put a level on the side. We could easily see the 8-foot-long T-Square was "tilted".
It was getting late, so, later this week we will actually climb the big redwood 100 feet away, and pull on one side of the cable or the other, until the 8-foot-long hanging T-Square shows that the vertical leg is level.
At that point, the two cables will be level.
We hope.
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Seymore4Head wrote, on Tue, 30 Sep 2014 15:57:42 -0400:

He's about 6'2" or 6'3" tall.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3901/15188714847_e77461b64d_c.jpg
And, those are the *small* redwoods halfway down.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3865/15195194790_8fe8c93589_c.jpg
The big redwood tree is another ten or twenty feet below that, downhill, whereas the 100-foot long 10-feet wide suspension bridge will be level.
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3873/15302627625_fc5bab3e26_c.jpg
It's a "home engineering" project, in the Santa Cruz mountains!
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Danny D. wrote, on Wed, 01 Oct 2014 11:09:36 +0000:

Sorry it took me so long.
Here's a picture of the method we used to level the two 100 foot cables:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3948/15314983930_3c606db7b4_b.jpg
We basically made a ten-foot wide T-square, where we used a level on the vertical bar to measure how level the two cables were.
If they weren't so high off the ground on the very steep slope, we'd just hang a lead weight from the midpoint of each cable, with an even length of rope for each cable - but we preferred to work at the only *flat* part along the entire 100 foot length of the two cables.
It was really difficult working in the trees to pull the cable around as it's both very high up in the air, as you can see by this netting we rigged:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3928/15501340972_e31032dcd7_c.jpg
And, the last redwood tree downhill itself is pretty gnarly, as shown here looking up at the same netting but from the safety of the ground:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5607/15498557171_df86936bcb_b.jpg
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Danny D. wrote, on Sat, 11 Oct 2014 05:38:07 +0000:

You can see the fencepost digger in that picture above, over to the left.
It wasn't easy, mainly because the California sediments are hard as rock this time of year, and, we were roped to trees so we wouldn't fall down the hill while we were drilling the fencepost hole in the slope:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5599/15501340252_51f138a020_b.jpg
It was my first fencepost hole in my life, so, I was surprised that the two bags of concrete mix went in dry:
https://c3.staticflickr.com/3/2947/15478564076_2f97dc13ea_c.jpg
Being on a 45 degree slope, it was impossible to keep the water in the hole, so, we tried containing it with a cut-off bucket - but it didn't work all that well to contain the water:
https://c4.staticflickr.com/4/3937/15315052878_bdd8583976_c.jpg
The second fencepost hole, for the drawbridge-like structure, wasn't as hard to drill as it was on a much (much) flatter portion of the hill where a path crossed under the cables strung between the redwood trees:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5602/15314984030_b5cd30457c_b.jpg
The last step of the evening was to stain the boards that will be used for the hundred foot long ten feet wide bridge from the top of the hill to the far redwood tree:
https://c2.staticflickr.com/6/5609/15501720095_aa0a849e04_c.jpg
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On Sat, 11 Oct 2014 05:48:37 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

When i have seen that done it didn't work out that well, the concrete never set properly. Sometimes it had to be dug out a few years layer and done normally mixed before placement after removing the mush.
?-)
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