Breaking up old concrete

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After living with them for months, I've finally decided to get rid of big concrete chunks (remains of an old retaining wall) from my back yard. Question: What non-power tools do I need to buy to break these into pieces small enough for me to lift and carry down the stairs - say 60 pounds or less? I thought big sledge hammer would shatter them; wrong! I have more time on my hands than money at the moment. Paul in San Francisco
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rent a electric jackhammer........
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Do you think that someone who has never touched an electric jackhammer before can operate one safely and successfully? I'm willing to try if your answers are yes. Any helpful tips? Paul in San Francisco
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yeah easy to use, just put on top and pull trigger.
harbor freight sells a nice one poretty cheap, they have lots of uses once you own one
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Like this?
http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber“853
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wrote:

No, more like this: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?ItemnumberF935
I have one and find ways to use it all the time - busting concrete, fence posts, digging out tree stubs. Its a bit too heavy, but if you really like a good one look at Hilti, very light and strong but mucho $$.
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I have the Harbor Freight jack hammer, and it's done fine and lasting a lot longer than I woulda thought. It's not as powerful as some of the big names, but on the other hand, it's lighter weight and therefore easier on a casual user.
wrote:
yeah easy to use, just put on top and pull trigger.
harbor freight sells a nice one poretty cheap, they have lots of uses once you own one
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Yes, I used one a few years ago. You should be fit enough to lift one. The tip will get stuck in the concrete if you drive it in too far making extra work to remove it but it's not real hard.
I broke up a big patio and had black and blue marks on my legs after 8 hours but it wasn't all that bad.
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On Wed, 09 May 2007 11:36:04 -0400, Dan Espen wrote:

I don't know about the US, but here in the UK power tools that vibrate in any way are labelled (by the Health and Safety Executive) with the recommended length of time they can be used in one go.
Vibrating tools of this type can cause vibration white finger and it is sensible to limit how much time in a twenty-four hour period you use them.
I sure as hell wouldn't use one for more than an hour at a time, even if I didn't often use one..
For more information see the following:
http://66.102.9.104/search?q Κche:6OOnWLAm0ZQJ:www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/ indg175.pdf+health+safety+executive+time+limit +drill&hl=en&ct=clnk&cd=2&gl=uk
--
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Both Mandriva 2007 and Ubuntu 6.06
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wrote:

That free heath care lobby must be behind this.
How do you guys get any work done?
-- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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How in heck did we ever get any work done "back in the good old days" before we knew this stuff was bad for us. I can't say how many hours I have with a 90#er on a IR BIG compressor.
I think it's psychological. Back in those days, we didn't know it was bad for us, and look how we turned out. Today's kids hear EVERYTHING is bad for them, so they either do nothing, or file for worker's comp the second day. Of course, on the second day, they've already gone on the Internet and read all about carpal tunnel and white finger and know how to go in and give a good presentation of symptoms to the doctor.
Good Gawd! Lawn darts, spud guns, how did we live through it?
Steve
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somewhere my dad still has those lawn darts (jarts?) i wonder if they could even be sold on ebay now, or are they too much of a weapon?
regards, charlie cave creek, az
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Quick search shows lawn dart tee shirts and plastic darts. What a load of c**p.
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On Wed, 09 May 2007 16:12:09 -0400, Dan Espen

No more dodge-ball?
At 14 - knives and guns were presents. Drive a car; alone during the day at 14 and at night a 16 year old with a license could allow me to drive at night as long as they were in the car.
JARTS were not weapons when they came to market. -- Oren
..through the use of electrical or duct tape, achieve the configuration in the photo..
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I bet a hundred dollars to a donut hole it would go something like this:
you sell the darts on ebay some kid pokes a hole in his little brother's skull (why is it always the YOUNGER brother?) they sue you for all you have and win.
Steve PS: If you have brothers, you know the answer to the question..................
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And if you're sixty and can't get a prescription bottle open, just hand it to an eight year old.
POP!
But I do see how it's better to protect the little ones.
Steve
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On Wed, 09 May 2007 11:00:27 -0700, Oren wrote:

Free health care lobby? WTF is that? The National Health Service takes care of the medical needs for all from the cradle to the grave. We pay for it by paying National Insurance contributions from our earnings (everyone is covered by this insurance).
As for vibration white finger, a number of cases have appeared in ex- miners in this country. In the US you have coal mines in the Appalachians and I wouldn't be surprised if VWF was common among older men in those areas.
Don't you have 'Health and Safety at Work' legislation in the US? Is it still legal to send 8-year-old boys up hot chimneys to clean them? In more civilised parts of the world that was outlawed some time ago. :-)
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wrote:

Does this also cover the Royal Family? Your NHS started for all citizens... "based on need, not ability to pay".

Occupational hazards. We don't have a National Health Executive telling us how long we can crawl on our knees to install tile, or lay carpet, or use a hammer. Not even how long to use a jack hammer.

Heath and Safety Legislation is one thing; entirely different from a NHE dictating the time you can operate equipment.
-- Oren
"The voices in my head may not be real, but they have some good ideas!"
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On Sat, 12 May 2007 09:53:49 -0700, Oren wrote:

Of course it covers them. I presume they pay their National Insurance contributions, although I would further presume that they would have some sort of private health insurance which they make use of.

Health and safety at work laws don't, as far as I know, cover the use of power tools at home for DIY purposes, although personally I'd keep length of usage guidelines in mind while using them. I like having all my fingers with sensation in them thanks very much. Then again I work in construction so the dangers of power tools are more relevant for me than the casual DIY-er.

Are there no daily time limits for truck drivers in the States? I'd hate the thought of lots of over-tired hauliers falling asleep at the wheel while I was travelling along your highways and byways. Most H & S legislation is merely common sense. Which of course doesn't seem to be as common as it's name would suggest :-)
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wrote:

If you're scared of tired truck drivers, think about our overworked, tired and stressed Air Traffic Controllers. Many are working ten hour days, six days a week - contributing to the crash of Comair Flight 5191 in Lexington. d8
-- Oren
Hofstadter's Law - It [a task] always takes longer than you expect, even when you take into account Hofstadter's Law.
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