Blower motor?

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For some people, running the blower fan 24/7 is very practical. I've been doing it for years. In the past 10 years, my blower fan has been turned off only when I'm working on the system and have to kill the power. I find that this lowers the operating cost of my somewhat undersized AC unit. It also maximized air flow through the furnace filter system, which provides allergy relief.
Furnace blower motors are well designed and intended for a long service life. The only problem with running one 24/7 is the fact that you MUST oil them frequently. Once a year is an absolute minimum. I prefer 3 to 4 times per year. On my furnace, the entire process of removing the fan assembly, oiling both oil ports, and reinstalling the fan assembly only takes 5 minutes. I also oil the fan motor in the AC compressor box a couple of times per year.
By the way, you are asking the question, "does running 24/7 reduce fan motor life?" The more important question is, "does running 24/7 significantly increase the chance that the motor will fail before the furnace is replaced?" Generally, the answer to the second question is "no".
Good luck, Gideon
============= BE wrote in message ... Just a question regarding the blower motor on my furnace. I just had the evaporator AC coil replaced. I mentioned to him that even before it went bad the home does not seem to stay cool for long. He told me to leave the fan switch on the thermostat to on so that it blows 24/7
Well needless to say that makes a huge difference as the compressor isn't needed as much.
My concern is will this shorten the life of the motor? And, is it ok to leave the fan on 24/7 for 2, 3, 4, 5 days? My thinking is to leave it on for whatever the duration of the heatwave. Correct?
Thanks...
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BE wrote:

I started running my fan 24/7 now. House is much cooler. Plus the circulation keeps some of my hotter rooms closer to normal. its excellent.
Oh and I realized my humidifier was still on ;)
--
Respectfully,


CL Gilbert
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Thats what most of us in the trade do. The motor will normally last much longer this way.

If you have poor air circulation, you will notice it more since you are helping to move the air that is called stagnated air around more.

Mines been on 24-7, other than when I am servicing the unit every 6 months, for the past 4 years, and its not going to be cut off any time in the future. The motors that we replace the FEWEST of, are the commercial applications that the fans run 24-7. We have some that have been on for over 9 years without a problem.

Depending on your airflow situation, you may even find that with the added electricity that is being used, that your power bill may drop, due to reduced compressor run times.

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I gotta agree with Stretch about the humidity issue. Whenever a customer calls about humidity being too high, the first question they are asked is "Do you have the fan in the on position?" If so, as soon as the compressor shuts off, the system converts from being an air conditioner to an evaporative cooler. We have a policy that if we are on a call, and find the fan in the on position, to let the customer know this, advise them of the possibility of getting mold in the ducts, then note it on the invoice and have them sign it. We also find besides air circulation, some people will run the fan continuosly for the constant noise, which they get used to, rather than having it on and off-- especially people with infants sleeping. (Usually these are upflow units in a hall closet close to the bedrooms) Larry
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Now this is an interesting one.
Not flaming you man, but what you say just went against everything in IAQ that has been taught by better than you and I.
Mold on ducts? Evap cooler?
The water left on the evap coil should be gone in a few minutes AFTER the condensor shuts down, due to drainage and like you say, evaporation. Water is not being poured over the coil as in an evap cooler, so you have a min of water that is being added back to the indoor air. The water in the pan, well, if the units installed right, there will be none left after about 10 -15 seconds of off time...provided its trapped, (if need be) and the unit, (and hence the pan included) is installed correctly.
The fact that the air is being filtered, and not allowing to become stagnant in some areas would inprove indoor air quality, and not hurt it. Should you find a home where the pan is full of water, or the coils covered in mold, then, a good tech would suggest that the lines be cleaned, the unit be set correctly, and the coils cleaned. The addition of a UV-C band unit would be a strong suggestion as well. The water that is being pulled off the coil and being evaporated by the cooler, dryer air that the unit just treated, would be minimal in a situation where the unit is sized and operation of the unit is correct. I doubt seriously that you would even get a 1%RH raise after the blower has moved enough air over the coil and pan to evaporate the remaining water. The mere fact that the water is being removed rather quickly from the coil, removes one thing that mold needs to grow, and remove the water, you remove one thing that mold needs out of the three to grow. Mold needs water, dark, and a food source. Pans that are allowed to sit there with water in them, sure...those units will grow mold. Units that are oversized, and only cool the air, and not remove enough water from the air, those will tend to grow mold as the air left in the ducts and home is laden with excess moisture. Units that have poor drainage qualities to the pan due to incorrect level or poor drainage of the condensate they willl grow mold as well.
IAQ is normally, assuming the unit is sized correctly, the ducts are installed and sized correctly to the unit, and home, improved by running the fan 24-7. If not 24-7, the addition of a Honeywell stat with circ capabilities that will cycle the fan X number of times per hour is a good addition as well.
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